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By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | June 3, 2008
VIENNA - Officials in this tiny Nanticoke River town have given up elaborate plans for annexing 400 acres and allowing enough homes to double the population of 280. Instead, Maryland's open-space program plans to spend $4.6 million to buy two-thirds of that land to preserve it as a "green belt." The purchase, to go before the state Board of Public Works for approval next week, would still give Vienna the chance to allow moderate growth on a separate 100-acre property if the owner wants to develop the site under the town's strict design standards, said Mayor Russ Brinsfield.
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NEWS
By Chris Guy and Chris Guy,Sun reporter | June 3, 2008
VIENNA - Officials in this tiny Nanticoke River town have given up elaborate plans for annexing 400 acres and allowing enough homes to double the population of 280. Instead, Maryland's open-space program plans to spend $4.6 million to buy two-thirds of that land to preserve it as a "green belt." The purchase, to go before the state Board of Public Works for approval next week, would still give Vienna the chance to allow moderate growth on a separate 100-acre property if the owner wants to develop the site under the town's strict design standards, said Mayor Russ Brinsfield.
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SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Staff Writer | July 8, 1993
He has won a trophy that dwarfs him by more than 2 feet and a bike that he can't pedal because his legs aren't long enough. But that's commonplace for 4-foot-2, 58-pound Devin "Get Busy" Guy, a 6-year-old who is ranked No. 1 in the region for 12-year-olds and younger in Kata and fighting.Guy, who will enter the second grade at Robert Coleman Elementary in Baltimore this fall, rose to the top spot at the beginning of the year, and has won two grand championships, 106 trophies and two bikes in two years of competition.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1997
The residents of Greenbelt like to think of their community as a city of "firsts," so it was only fitting that they would come up with another one to mark its 60th anniversary.For the past month, they've been filling the Greenbelt Arts Center to see a full-length play that was commissioned to celebrate what sets the place apart:The federal government's first venture in housing and the first community built under the "garden city" movement launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, it also was the first city in Maryland to have a public swimming pool, a city manager, a "cooperative" nursery and other innovations.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | January 31, 1997
The residents of Greenbelt like to think of their community as a city of "firsts," so it was only fitting that they would come up with another one to mark its 60th anniversary.For the past month, they've been filling the Greenbelt Arts Center to see a full-length play that was commissioned to celebrate what sets the place apart:The federal government's first venture in housing and the first community built under the "garden city" movement launched by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, it also was the first city in Maryland to have a public swimming pool, a city manager, a "cooperative" nursery and other innovations.
NEWS
By LUCY KOMISAR | May 31, 1992
As the Earth Summit in Brazil, opening Wednesday, focuses attention on the environment, it might surprise Americans to learn that the "green" movement has taken root in developing countries. The difference there is that environmental activists are looked on as threats by dictators who fear that citizen organizations challenge their power.A noted example is in Kenya, whose most popular political figure, environmentalist Wangari Maathai, is a target of dictator Daniel T. arap Moi. She presently faces government charges of "rumor mongering," and she was beaten unconscious by security forces during a protest to free political prisoners in March.
NEWS
By Jamie Manfuso and Jamie Manfuso,SUN STAFF | February 13, 2001
Planners from Hampstead and Carroll County discussed old and new proposals last night to improve the quality of life in and around the town. High on the list of proposals were: a long-delayed bypass around the north Carroll town; boundaries for growth around Hampstead; and increasing the capacity of the county wastewater treatment plant to accommodate growth. About a dozen people, mostly county and town officials, attended the meeting last night at Hampstead Town Hall. The Carroll and town planning boards met to discuss the Hampstead comprehensive plan.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 9, 2004
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Kenyan environmentalist and human rights activist Wangari Maathai, who has worked for nearly 30 years combating deforestation, stamping out corruption and empowering women in Africa, won the Nobel Peace Prize yesterday. Mobilizing thousands of women to plant 30 million trees on farms and public lands and in forests across Kenya, Maathai staved off the ruin of her country's fragile landscape while providing desperately needed jobs for the poor. Maathai, the first African woman to win the Peace Prize, was praised by the awarding committee as "a strong voice speaking for the best forces in Africa to promote peace and good living conditions on that continent."
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1999
The Carroll commissioners yesterday took the first step toward their goal of preserving 1,000 acres along Little Pipe Creek, near the historic towns of Union Bridge and New Windsor.The three-member Board of County Commissioners unanimously approved seven applications to the state's Rural Legacy program. It is expected to take the state's rural legacy and public works boards about two months to review the documents.Approval by state officials would give the county commissioners permission to spend about $1.4 million to protect 634 acres in the Little Pipe Creek watershed, a 35,000-acre area on the western edge of the county.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | August 6, 1999
The Carroll commissioners yesterday took the first step toward their goal of preserving 1,000 acres along Little Pipe Creek, near the historic towns of Union Bridge and New Windsor.The three-member Board of County Commissioners unanimously approved seven applications to the state's Rural Legacy program. It is expected to take the state's rural legacy and public works boards about two months to review the documents.Approval by state officials would give the county commissioners permission to spend about $1.4 million to protect 634 acres in the Little Pipe Creek watershed, a 35,000-acre area on the western edge of the county.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Staff Writer | July 8, 1993
He has won a trophy that dwarfs him by more than 2 feet and a bike that he can't pedal because his legs aren't long enough. But that's commonplace for 4-foot-2, 58-pound Devin "Get Busy" Guy, a 6-year-old who is ranked No. 1 in the region for 12-year-olds and younger in Kata and fighting.Guy, who will enter the second grade at Robert Coleman Elementary in Baltimore this fall, rose to the top spot at the beginning of the year, and has won two grand championships, 106 trophies and two bikes in two years of competition.
NEWS
August 23, 1996
Jewish National Fund marks silver anniversaryThe Maryland/Delaware Region of the Jewish National Fund commemorates the silver anniversary of its Blue and White Gala at 6 p.m. Sept. 8 at the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel.This year's celebration coincides with the 3,000th anniversary of Jerusalem and the 95th birthday of the Jewish National Fund.Television journalist Barbara Walters will speak.Jack Luskin, chairman of Luskin's Inc., will receive the Keter Shem Tov (Crown of Good Name) Award for his philanthropy and community service.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | September 23, 1999
Orlando Theophilus Johnson, a retired nuclear physicist, died of heart failure Monday at University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 77 and lived in Bolton Hill.For 38 years, Mr. Johnson studied mechanics at the Ballistic Research Laboratory at Aberdeen Proving Ground (APG).In December 1976, he was given the Kent Award -- the lab's highest honor, named after Army officer R. H. Kent -- for his research. The citation noted his "outstanding leadership and consistent technical excellence."The author of many technical papers on foreign aircraft and American helicopters, Mr. Johnson was part of a 500-member unit that worked at Aberdeen after World War II. It has since merged into the Army Research Lab, with its headquarters in Adelphi.
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