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NEWS
By LYN BACKE | March 6, 1995
New Orleans and Bahia have their Mardi Gras, recently celebrated and long remembered.On Sunday, nearly two weeks after Mardi Gras, certain citizens of Eastport will take the wraps off their own frenzy in the streets: the 14th Annual St. Patrick's Day Green Beer Race at Third Street and Severn Avenue.It isn't really on St. Patrick's Day. And it isn't "a" race -- it's a men's race and a women's race and a tricycle race and lots of other events.There's street entertainment by jugglers and fire-eaters and There's street entertainment by jugglers and fire-eaters and mimes and who knows what-all.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | March 17, 2007
Don't let the funny German surname fool you. I've got some serious Irish roots, so I'll be somewhere today lifting a green beer to the Maryland Terrapins, if they can hold on to the ball long enough to beat Butler in the second round of the NCAA tournament. The Irish comes from my mother's side, along with some Scottish thrown in to screw up my golf swing. You'd think it would be hard to find an Irish bar among all the Cuban restaurants and Jimmy Buffett-themed tourist spots in South Florida, but there are a boatload of them in the Fort Lauderdale area.
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SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | March 17, 2007
Don't let the funny German surname fool you. I've got some serious Irish roots, so I'll be somewhere today lifting a green beer to the Maryland Terrapins, if they can hold on to the ball long enough to beat Butler in the second round of the NCAA tournament. The Irish comes from my mother's side, along with some Scottish thrown in to screw up my golf swing. You'd think it would be hard to find an Irish bar among all the Cuban restaurants and Jimmy Buffett-themed tourist spots in South Florida, but there are a boatload of them in the Fort Lauderdale area.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
If you would like to dodge the wild and crazy St. Patrick's Day festivities in favor of more family-related fun, give these events a whirl. Sponsored by the Department of Recreation and Parks, they all take place tomorrow: DJ Gary O'Baykowski will spin Irish jigs and other music at the St. Paddy's Day Disco at Farring-Baybrook Recreation Center from 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Lunch includes hot dogs, potato salad and chips. Admission is $7. The center is at 4501 Farring Court. 410-396-1550. Visitors to Cylburn Arboretum can create a small herb garden for their windowsill or outside porch, trade herb recipes and sample foods made from herbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | March 15, 1991
McGinn's Irish Pub and Restaurant has the perfect location for Sunday's St. Patrick's Day parade, which marches right by its Charles Street front door. Serving as the unofficial parade headquarters, McGinn's will once again be a "mob scene" in the words of pub manager John Mauro.McGinn's is expecting upward of 1,000 revelers to stop in Sunday for a beer (or several) and impressive quantities of Irish lamb stew, corned beef and cabbage. Because this is a year-round Irish pub and not an American bar that turns green for the day, there will be plenty of dark Guinness on tap but no green beer.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,Contributing Writer | March 17, 1995
There's plenty to do for St. Patrick's Day this weekend, whether you're looking for the traditional corned beef and cabbage and pints of green beer or a chance to dress like a leprechaun. Regardless of how you choose to celebrate the holiday, remember that on March 17, everyone is Irish.Baltimore gets into the St. Patrick's Day spirit with a parade this Sunday starting at 2 p.m. The annual event is usually Baltimore's biggest parade of the year. This year, more than 120 marching units, bands and floats will make their way through the streets of Baltimore starting at Mount Vernon Place and proceeding south on Charles Street, then on to Pratt Street to Market Place.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff | March 16, 2000
'Tis a day to be green, but not with envy, for all are invited to celebrate St. Patrick's Day. 'Tis time for all lads and lassies to join the festivities, no matter if ye be Irish or not. Sure, it would be great to celebrate the day in Ireland, but for most of us that is not a likely scenario. So don your green apparel tomorrow, grab your shamrocks and hoist a brew at one or more of the numerous celebrations in the area. You can choose from among the many Irish pubs planning major celebrations for their biggest day of the year.
NEWS
By Seamus Martin and Seamus Martin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 17, 2002
DUBLIN, Ireland - If someone wishes you "the top o' the mornin'" today and offers to buy you a green beer to celebrate St. Patrick's Day, tell him to hold on a minute. It's time to remember that most Irish stereotypes are hopelessly outdated nowadays. In Ireland, if you wished someone "the top o' the mornin'," you would be taken for a being that had just arrived from Mars, and as for green beer, Guinness, the national tipple, is so black that it defies even the strongest of dyes. Most of the stereotypes center on drink, so it's worthwhile looking at the statistics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
If you would like to dodge the wild and crazy St. Patrick's Day festivities in favor of more family-related fun, give these events a whirl. Sponsored by the Department of Recreation and Parks, they all take place tomorrow: DJ Gary O'Baykowski will spin Irish jigs and other music at the St. Paddy's Day Disco at Farring-Baybrook Recreation Center from 10:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Lunch includes hot dogs, potato salad and chips. Admission is $7. The center is at 4501 Farring Court. 410-396-1550. Visitors to Cylburn Arboretum can create a small herb garden for their windowsill or outside porch, trade herb recipes and sample foods made from herbs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
Go out for a brew tomorrow and you are bound to hear this conversation at least once: "Dude, I've been drinking since 6 a.m.!" "Yeah, man, me too!" "It's only noon, and I'm exhausted!" "Yeah, man, me too!" From Guinness breakfasts to green beer and the inevitable Irish jig, St. Patrick's Day brings out the sloppy side in plenty of people. After all, it's hard not to party when there are so many options citywide. Here are some of the bigger throwdowns around, by neighborhood: With radio personalities, tons of live music and leprechaun look-alike contests, the Party on the Point starts tomorrow and also spans all day Saturday.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA and SAM SESSA,SUN REPORTER | March 16, 2006
Go out for a brew tomorrow and you are bound to hear this conversation at least once: "Dude, I've been drinking since 6 a.m.!" "Yeah, man, me too!" "It's only noon, and I'm exhausted!" "Yeah, man, me too!" From Guinness breakfasts to green beer and the inevitable Irish jig, St. Patrick's Day brings out the sloppy side in plenty of people. After all, it's hard not to party when there are so many options citywide. Here are some of the bigger throwdowns around, by neighborhood: With radio personalities, tons of live music and leprechaun look-alike contests, the Party on the Point starts tomorrow and also spans all day Saturday.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2004
McCormick & Schmick is known most days for its seafood, but this time of year its menu more resembles that of an Irish pub. In celebration of St. Patrick's Day tomorrow, the Inner Harbor restaurant brings in Irish steppers and adds corned beef and cabbage, shepherd's pie, bangers and mash, and mussels steamed in Guinness beer to the menu. "In our company, St. Patrick's Day has become like a national holiday," general manager Kevin Bonner said. Once celebrated most widely in Irish enclaves such as Boston, St. Patrick's Day is becoming more mainstream - and more commercial.
NEWS
By Seamus Martin and Seamus Martin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 17, 2002
DUBLIN, Ireland - If someone wishes you "the top o' the mornin'" today and offers to buy you a green beer to celebrate St. Patrick's Day, tell him to hold on a minute. It's time to remember that most Irish stereotypes are hopelessly outdated nowadays. In Ireland, if you wished someone "the top o' the mornin'," you would be taken for a being that had just arrived from Mars, and as for green beer, Guinness, the national tipple, is so black that it defies even the strongest of dyes. Most of the stereotypes center on drink, so it's worthwhile looking at the statistics.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff | March 16, 2000
'Tis a day to be green, but not with envy, for all are invited to celebrate St. Patrick's Day. 'Tis time for all lads and lassies to join the festivities, no matter if ye be Irish or not. Sure, it would be great to celebrate the day in Ireland, but for most of us that is not a likely scenario. So don your green apparel tomorrow, grab your shamrocks and hoist a brew at one or more of the numerous celebrations in the area. You can choose from among the many Irish pubs planning major celebrations for their biggest day of the year.
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1999
Slavery made Patrick a saint.He didn't drive the snakes out of Ireland, and there is no way to know whether he used the three-leaf shamrock to teach the doctrine of the Trinity. But there is more solid history to Patrick's legend than to those of other holiday saints, such as Valentine and Nicholas.Patrick, or Patricius, apparently came from a family of Romanized Britons; his father was a minor official and his grandfather a Roman Catholic priest.Rome still nominally ruled Britain, but the empire was disintegrating and no longer offered security from barbarian raids.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Lisa Wiseman and Lisa Wiseman,Contributing Writer | March 17, 1995
There's plenty to do for St. Patrick's Day this weekend, whether you're looking for the traditional corned beef and cabbage and pints of green beer or a chance to dress like a leprechaun. Regardless of how you choose to celebrate the holiday, remember that on March 17, everyone is Irish.Baltimore gets into the St. Patrick's Day spirit with a parade this Sunday starting at 2 p.m. The annual event is usually Baltimore's biggest parade of the year. This year, more than 120 marching units, bands and floats will make their way through the streets of Baltimore starting at Mount Vernon Place and proceeding south on Charles Street, then on to Pratt Street to Market Place.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2004
McCormick & Schmick is known most days for its seafood, but this time of year its menu more resembles that of an Irish pub. In celebration of St. Patrick's Day tomorrow, the Inner Harbor restaurant brings in Irish steppers and adds corned beef and cabbage, shepherd's pie, bangers and mash, and mussels steamed in Guinness beer to the menu. "In our company, St. Patrick's Day has become like a national holiday," general manager Kevin Bonner said. Once celebrated most widely in Irish enclaves such as Boston, St. Patrick's Day is becoming more mainstream - and more commercial.
NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | March 17, 1999
Slavery made Patrick a saint.He didn't drive the snakes out of Ireland, and there is no way to know whether he used the three-leaf shamrock to teach the doctrine of the Trinity. But there is more solid history to Patrick's legend than to those of other holiday saints, such as Valentine and Nicholas.Patrick, or Patricius, apparently came from a family of Romanized Britons; his father was a minor official and his grandfather a Roman Catholic priest.Rome still nominally ruled Britain, but the empire was disintegrating and no longer offered security from barbarian raids.
NEWS
By LYN BACKE | March 6, 1995
New Orleans and Bahia have their Mardi Gras, recently celebrated and long remembered.On Sunday, nearly two weeks after Mardi Gras, certain citizens of Eastport will take the wraps off their own frenzy in the streets: the 14th Annual St. Patrick's Day Green Beer Race at Third Street and Severn Avenue.It isn't really on St. Patrick's Day. And it isn't "a" race -- it's a men's race and a women's race and a tricycle race and lots of other events.There's street entertainment by jugglers and fire-eaters and There's street entertainment by jugglers and fire-eaters and mimes and who knows what-all.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | March 15, 1991
McGinn's Irish Pub and Restaurant has the perfect location for Sunday's St. Patrick's Day parade, which marches right by its Charles Street front door. Serving as the unofficial parade headquarters, McGinn's will once again be a "mob scene" in the words of pub manager John Mauro.McGinn's is expecting upward of 1,000 revelers to stop in Sunday for a beer (or several) and impressive quantities of Irish lamb stew, corned beef and cabbage. Because this is a year-round Irish pub and not an American bar that turns green for the day, there will be plenty of dark Guinness on tap but no green beer.
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