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Tim Wheeler | April 10, 2012
In a legislative session marked by discord over taxes and gambling, lawmakers came together to pass three major bills aimed at boosting Chesapeake Bay cleanup efforts. They failed to agree, however, on other environmental priorities - a bill to subsidize building wind turbines off Ocean City, and a measure requiring natural gas companies to pay for studying the impacts of drilling for energy in western Maryland. The General Assembly approved two bay billls that were priorities of the O'Malley administration bills, one doubling the 'flush fee' to pay for upgrading sewage treatment plants and another limiting rural development on septic systems.  A third late-moving bill pushed by environmentalists would require Baltimore city and nine suburban counties to levy local fees to pay for curbing polluted runoff from their streets and parking lots.
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FEATURES
Tim Wheeler | April 10, 2012
In a legislative session marked by discord over taxes and gambling, lawmakers came together to pass three major bills aimed at boosting Chesapeake Bay cleanup efforts. They failed to agree, however, on other environmental priorities - a bill to subsidize building wind turbines off Ocean City, and a measure requiring natural gas companies to pay for studying the impacts of drilling for energy in western Maryland. The General Assembly approved two bay billls that were priorities of the O'Malley administration bills, one doubling the 'flush fee' to pay for upgrading sewage treatment plants and another limiting rural development on septic systems.  A third late-moving bill pushed by environmentalists would require Baltimore city and nine suburban counties to levy local fees to pay for curbing polluted runoff from their streets and parking lots.
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NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2000
The presentation took a couple of minutes, long enough for a few quick words and a grip-and-grin photo. But behind the perfunctory moment in the Maryland Senate chamber yesterday lay a world of politics and history. It was "green bag" day, the 40th day of the legislative session, the day the governor sends his list of appointments for the Senate's approval. It's an annual event, Christmas in February at the State House. Each year, the appointments arrive like thank-you notes. This year, 197 names were in the green bag. The appointments included positions on the University System of Maryland Board of Regents, the state Board of Well Drillers, the Maryland Racing Commission and the Amusement Ride Safety Advisory Board.
NEWS
By HEATHER GEHLERT and HEATHER GEHLERT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- David Wolf's passion is constitutional law; his hobby is collecting. So when the Washington lawyer discovered a listing on eBay that would round out one of his collections, he forked over $2,100. It was for a limited-edition, 8-inch poly-resin bobblehead of the late U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist. "I don't know if I can explain it," said Wolf. "I'm obsessive." Wolf also paid more than $800 for a Justice John Paul Stevens bobblehead after he realized that the one he owned was missing the small golf club in the figurine's right hand.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | June 25, 1995
Although Baltimore City College was founded as a public high school in 1839 by an ordinance of Mayor Sheppard C. Leakin, it wasn't until 1896 that the school turned out its first yearbook, called "The Green Bag." G. Warfield Hobbs Jr., a member of that year's graduating class, organized the staff and edited that first issue. This year the school is celebrating the 100th issuance of "The Green Bag," which through the years has chronicled the graduating class and the student life of the nation's third-oldest public high school.
NEWS
By HEATHER GEHLERT and HEATHER GEHLERT,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 23, 2006
WASHINGTON -- David Wolf's passion is constitutional law; his hobby is collecting. So when the Washington lawyer discovered a listing on eBay that would round out one of his collections, he forked over $2,100. It was for a limited-edition, 8-inch poly-resin bobblehead of the late U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice William H. Rehnquist. "I don't know if I can explain it," said Wolf. "I'm obsessive." Wolf also paid more than $800 for a Justice John Paul Stevens bobblehead after he realized that the one he owned was missing the small golf club in the figurine's right hand.
NEWS
By Franklin Mason | July 17, 1991
HE ALWAYS put everything off until the last minute, and now it was.It was the day of the night of his reunion, the 60th reunion of his City College class, Class of 1931. Could he face it? Would he know these faces?City College for him lately had been a bag, a canvas bag he'd bought some time ago. The bag on the outside showed City College, its tower standing tall; the address, 33rd Street and the Alameda, and the date, "Erected 1928."That was the year he had first climbed to the "Castle on the Hill."
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
WITH THE NEW term of the Maryland General Assembly beginning tomorrow, it seems appropriate to provide an updated lexicon of the political parlance of the state.To wit:Arm-breaking: Lining up "the votes" persuasively, the old-fashioned way. Used to ensure leadership gets what leadership wants.Bell-ringer: A bill or amendment proposed to the legislature to exact favors and money (as in ringing the cash register bell) from those whose interests are threatened by the legislation.B'hoys: Originally the Irish ward heelers of the large Eastern cities such as Baltimore.
NEWS
January 13, 1991
The State House has a language of its own, some slang, some not. Some of the words are peculiar to Maryland, some words were uttered, repeated and stuck for good with generations of politicians and those who watch them. Here are some of the most common:ADMINISTRATION -- The governor, his Cabinet and staff.BY REQUEST -- a bill filed for a constituent or interest group. A bill so labeled suggests that the author has no personal stake in the legislation but has acted out of courtesy for someone else.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
In November, 82 seats in the 188-member Maryland General Assembly turned over, and a new regime from Prince George's County ("The Sowth," as Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. would say) overtook the second floor of the State House.With that volume of personnel changing, it seems appropriate -- and instructive -- to provide a lexicon for newcomers to familiarize them with the political parlance of Maryland.Here goes:Arm-breaking: Lining up "the votes" persuasively, the old-fashioned way. Used to ensure leadership gets what leadership wants.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Howard Libit and Alec MacGillis and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2004
ONE OF life's small -- very small -- joys is studying the list of the governor's annual appointments to the state's umpteen panels and commissions in search of any telling political subplots contained therein. The list, known as the "green bag," was announced late last week, and the tension was palpable: Who, pray tell, had been named to the State Board of Well Drillers? What back-room machinations had won nominees their coveted spots on the Advisory Council on Youth Camp Safety or the Amusement Ride Safety Board?
NEWS
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | February 19, 2000
The presentation took a couple of minutes, long enough for a few quick words and a grip-and-grin photo. But behind the perfunctory moment in the Maryland Senate chamber yesterday lay a world of politics and history. It was "green bag" day, the 40th day of the legislative session, the day the governor sends his list of appointments for the Senate's approval. It's an annual event, Christmas in February at the State House. Each year, the appointments arrive like thank-you notes. This year, 197 names were in the green bag. The appointments included positions on the University System of Maryland Board of Regents, the state Board of Well Drillers, the Maryland Racing Commission and the Amusement Ride Safety Advisory Board.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,SUN STAFF | January 12, 1999
WITH THE NEW term of the Maryland General Assembly beginning tomorrow, it seems appropriate to provide an updated lexicon of the political parlance of the state.To wit:Arm-breaking: Lining up "the votes" persuasively, the old-fashioned way. Used to ensure leadership gets what leadership wants.Bell-ringer: A bill or amendment proposed to the legislature to exact favors and money (as in ringing the cash register bell) from those whose interests are threatened by the legislation.B'hoys: Originally the Irish ward heelers of the large Eastern cities such as Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Fred Rasmussen | June 25, 1995
Although Baltimore City College was founded as a public high school in 1839 by an ordinance of Mayor Sheppard C. Leakin, it wasn't until 1896 that the school turned out its first yearbook, called "The Green Bag." G. Warfield Hobbs Jr., a member of that year's graduating class, organized the staff and edited that first issue. This year the school is celebrating the 100th issuance of "The Green Bag," which through the years has chronicled the graduating class and the student life of the nation's third-oldest public high school.
NEWS
By William F. Zorzi Jr. and William F. Zorzi Jr.,Sun Staff Writer | February 8, 1995
In November, 82 seats in the 188-member Maryland General Assembly turned over, and a new regime from Prince George's County ("The Sowth," as Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. would say) overtook the second floor of the State House.With that volume of personnel changing, it seems appropriate -- and instructive -- to provide a lexicon for newcomers to familiarize them with the political parlance of Maryland.Here goes:Arm-breaking: Lining up "the votes" persuasively, the old-fashioned way. Used to ensure leadership gets what leadership wants.
NEWS
By Franklin Mason | July 17, 1991
HE ALWAYS put everything off until the last minute, and now it was.It was the day of the night of his reunion, the 60th reunion of his City College class, Class of 1931. Could he face it? Would he know these faces?City College for him lately had been a bag, a canvas bag he'd bought some time ago. The bag on the outside showed City College, its tower standing tall; the address, 33rd Street and the Alameda, and the date, "Erected 1928."That was the year he had first climbed to the "Castle on the Hill."
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Howard Libit and Alec MacGillis and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | February 24, 2004
ONE OF life's small -- very small -- joys is studying the list of the governor's annual appointments to the state's umpteen panels and commissions in search of any telling political subplots contained therein. The list, known as the "green bag," was announced late last week, and the tension was palpable: Who, pray tell, had been named to the State Board of Well Drillers? What back-room machinations had won nominees their coveted spots on the Advisory Council on Youth Camp Safety or the Amusement Ride Safety Board?
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | August 7, 1993
One of the more annoying aspects of most renovation projects is that a solution to an old problem often creates a new problem. In many cases, the new problem involves getting rid of debris left over from a repair or change. That's the case for a Baltimore reader who wants to know how to get rid of an old oil-storage tank."I switched over to natural gas," he writes, "and I would like to drain my [oil] tank and remove it from my basement by myself. I'm concerned about a fire hazard if I leave it or, while removing it. I must cut it in sections to get it out of my basement."
NEWS
January 13, 1991
The State House has a language of its own, some slang, some not. Some of the words are peculiar to Maryland, some words were uttered, repeated and stuck for good with generations of politicians and those who watch them. Here are some of the most common:ADMINISTRATION -- The governor, his Cabinet and staff.BY REQUEST -- a bill filed for a constituent or interest group. A bill so labeled suggests that the author has no personal stake in the legislation but has acted out of courtesy for someone else.
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