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By DAN RODRICKS | September 14, 1998
I have heard it said more than once in the past week that the Clinton scandal seems to be playing out like a Greek tragedy. But which one? Something by Euripides? ("Hey, Monica, look what you did to my pants! You rippa deez!") Sophocles is more like it. Here's something from "Oedipus Rex" that might apply: "The tyrant is a child of pride who drinks from his great sickening cup recklessness and vanity, until from his high chest headlong he plummets to the dust of hope." (Hope, Ark.) Or this one: "How dreadful knowledge of the truth can be when there's no help in truth!"
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 24, 2004
The way-out idea for what Tad Janes describes as his "B-52's, science fiction, go-go musical," Planet Claire, struck him three years ago on a road trip to South Carolina. Driving late at night, while his baby daughter slept, Janes was listening to the post-punk sounds of the B-52's when a song called "Hero Worship" caught his attention. "It's an intense song," Janes says of the lyrics about a woman crying over the body of her dead lover. "There's a whole section of the song that is just moaning and wailing and screaming.
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NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | April 28, 1995
PERHAPS THERE is some historic lesson in the fact that, for several weeks now, we have been focusing on Robert McNamara's strange more-or-less "mea culpa" on Vietnam. And in all the things that his book, "In Retrospect," is (and is not), it is surely bursting with the arrogance and hubris of the 1960s' best and brightest.And now comes an extraordinary public television show titled "The Fall of Saigon," to be aired around the country this weekend. Here you have the inevitable results of hubris, as the ancient Greeks surely could have warned us: destruction, alienation, anomie.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 19, 1999
"Every so often, almost as if on schedule, something happens to the Kennedys, and we gather around our television sets to watch them deal with yet another unspeakable grief," CBS Washington correspondent Bob Schieffer said yesterday.And so it was this weekend, as many of us started out to enjoy a hot, lazy midsummer Saturday and suddenly found ourselves sucked back into the nightmare that started in Dallas in 1963, into all the horrible Kennedy history that we have grown up with on TV since.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 24, 2004
The way-out idea for what Tad Janes describes as his "B-52's, science fiction, go-go musical," Planet Claire, struck him three years ago on a road trip to South Carolina. Driving late at night, while his baby daughter slept, Janes was listening to the post-punk sounds of the B-52's when a song called "Hero Worship" caught his attention. "It's an intense song," Janes says of the lyrics about a woman crying over the body of her dead lover. "There's a whole section of the song that is just moaning and wailing and screaming.
NEWS
April 9, 1993
"Medea," the Greek tragedy by Euripides, will be presented by the Western Maryland College theater department in six performances, beginning April 23 on the Understage in Alumni Hall.Other performances will be held on April 24-25 and April 29-May 1. All shows will begin at 8 p.m.Written in 431 B.C. during one of the most expansive periods in Western thought, "Medea" was taken from the Greek myth about a sorceress whose amorality and treachery destroy her family.The tragedy, among the timeless works of literature, has influenced novelists and dramatists over the centuries.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | June 2, 1995
North County High School in Ferndale may seem a trifle removed from the amphitheater at Athens, but that hardly fazes a troupe of actors intent on bringing Greek tragedy to the stage in Anne Arundel County.This weekend and next, Sophocles' immortal "Oedipus Rex" will be presented at North County under the auspices of the American Hellenic Educational Progressive Association (AHEPA), the men's club of Baltimore's Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation."Almost a year and a half ago, some idiot asked if the Baltimore Greek community had ever sponsored or performed a Greek tragedy," AHEPA member Gus Demos of Bel Air said, laughing.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 2, 1992
Marion Isaac McClinton's "Police Boys" is like an episode of "Hill Street Blues" set in hell. ("Hell Street Blues," if you will).The play, making its world premiere as part of Center Stage's re:Discovery series, takes place during a state of emergency in an unnamed inner city. A gang, the Police Boys, has declared open season on the cops, and before it's over this urban Armageddon produces more dead and wounded than a Greek tragedy.As directed by the playwright and performed at a fever pitch, this is undeniably powerful material.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | April 2, 1992
Marion Isaac McClinton's "Police Boys" is like an episode of "Hill Street Blues" set in hell. ("Hell Street Blues," if you will).The play, making its world premiere as part of Center Stage's re:Discovery series, takes place during a state of emergency in an unnamed inner city. A gang, the Police Boys, has declared open season on the cops, and before it's over this urban Armageddon produces more dead and wounded than a Greek tragedy.As directed by the playwright and performed at a fever pitch, this is undeniably powerful material.
NEWS
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Sun Television Critic | July 19, 1999
"Every so often, almost as if on schedule, something happens to the Kennedys, and we gather around our television sets to watch them deal with yet another unspeakable grief," CBS Washington correspondent Bob Schieffer said yesterday.And so it was this weekend, as many of us started out to enjoy a hot, lazy midsummer Saturday and suddenly found ourselves sucked back into the nightmare that started in Dallas in 1963, into all the horrible Kennedy history that we have grown up with on TV since.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | September 14, 1998
I have heard it said more than once in the past week that the Clinton scandal seems to be playing out like a Greek tragedy. But which one? Something by Euripides? ("Hey, Monica, look what you did to my pants! You rippa deez!") Sophocles is more like it. Here's something from "Oedipus Rex" that might apply: "The tyrant is a child of pride who drinks from his great sickening cup recklessness and vanity, until from his high chest headlong he plummets to the dust of hope." (Hope, Ark.) Or this one: "How dreadful knowledge of the truth can be when there's no help in truth!"
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | November 3, 1995
"Mighty Aphrodite" is Woody Allen's take on the great fate-haunted, destiny-tossed Greek dramas of yore, and he does manage to come up with something Sophocles never thought of: a tragedy with a happy ending.But what did Sophocles know?The movie is a return to the loopy, not terribly deep mode of parody out of which Allen first hacked his career with films like "Sleeper" (sci-fi), "Love and Death" (Russian novels) or even "Zelig" (documentary). That means, consequently, that it's still a further turn away from the powerful examinations of moral ambivalence that have consumed him over the past decade, as in "Crimes and Misdemeanors" or "Husbands and Wives."
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,Special to The Sun | June 2, 1995
North County High School in Ferndale may seem a trifle removed from the amphitheater at Athens, but that hardly fazes a troupe of actors intent on bringing Greek tragedy to the stage in Anne Arundel County.This weekend and next, Sophocles' immortal "Oedipus Rex" will be presented at North County under the auspices of the American Hellenic Educational Progressive Association (AHEPA), the men's club of Baltimore's Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation."Almost a year and a half ago, some idiot asked if the Baltimore Greek community had ever sponsored or performed a Greek tragedy," AHEPA member Gus Demos of Bel Air said, laughing.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | April 28, 1995
PERHAPS THERE is some historic lesson in the fact that, for several weeks now, we have been focusing on Robert McNamara's strange more-or-less "mea culpa" on Vietnam. And in all the things that his book, "In Retrospect," is (and is not), it is surely bursting with the arrogance and hubris of the 1960s' best and brightest.And now comes an extraordinary public television show titled "The Fall of Saigon," to be aired around the country this weekend. Here you have the inevitable results of hubris, as the ancient Greeks surely could have warned us: destruction, alienation, anomie.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | November 3, 1993
It takes a certain amount of skill, and maybe a little hubris, to stage a Greek tragedy. It takes even more skill to stage it with masks -- as the Greeks did. In fact, for an American cast, probably the only thing more difficult would be to stage it in the original classic Greek.Director Suzanne Pratt and the talented cast at Theatre Hopkins don't go that far with Sophocles' "Antigone."But they have added an intriguing wrinkle. Actually, they've added more than a wrinkle, they've added another entire play -- A. R. Gurney's "Another Antigone."
NEWS
April 9, 1993
"Medea," the Greek tragedy by Euripides, will be presented by the Western Maryland College theater department in six performances, beginning April 23 on the Understage in Alumni Hall.Other performances will be held on April 24-25 and April 29-May 1. All shows will begin at 8 p.m.Written in 431 B.C. during one of the most expansive periods in Western thought, "Medea" was taken from the Greek myth about a sorceress whose amorality and treachery destroy her family.The tragedy, among the timeless works of literature, has influenced novelists and dramatists over the centuries.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | November 3, 1993
It takes a certain amount of skill, and maybe a little hubris, to stage a Greek tragedy. It takes even more skill to stage it with masks -- as the Greeks did. In fact, for an American cast, probably the only thing more difficult would be to stage it in the original classic Greek.Director Suzanne Pratt and the talented cast at Theatre Hopkins don't go that far with Sophocles' "Antigone."But they have added an intriguing wrinkle. Actually, they've added more than a wrinkle, they've added another entire play -- A. R. Gurney's "Another Antigone."
NEWS
By Madison Smartt Bell | September 27, 1992
THE SECRET HISTORY.Donna Tartt.Knopf.524 pages. $23. If you think you don't want to read any more books about bad Bennington kids, the publicity juggernaut surrounding Donna Tartt's first novel may turn you away. She's pals with Bret Easton Ellis, blurbed by Jay McInerney, profiled in Vanity Fair, touched with the Midas gilt of a three-figure advance for this book. The volume itself is a sleek, expensive package, dust-jacketed in Mylar, no less, with the equally expensive-looking author photo printed as a transparency . . . looks like they must be trying to hide something.
FEATURES
By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Music Critic | January 24, 1993
When Jessye Norman sings Wednesday evening in Meyerhoff Hall, you can expect pandemonium: There will be clapping, there will be cheers and there will be -- even, perhaps most especially, from the men in the audience -- tears. Norman will provoke this admiration, rapture and identification not simply because she is a great artist, but because she is much more: She is a diva.The word -- Italian for goddess -- means more than just a famous female opera singer. There are great sopranos -- Victoria de los Angeles was one of them -- who are not divas.
NEWS
By Madison Smartt Bell | September 27, 1992
THE SECRET HISTORY.Donna Tartt.Knopf.524 pages. $23. If you think you don't want to read any more books about bad Bennington kids, the publicity juggernaut surrounding Donna Tartt's first novel may turn you away. She's pals with Bret Easton Ellis, blurbed by Jay McInerney, profiled in Vanity Fair, touched with the Midas gilt of a three-figure advance for this book. The volume itself is a sleek, expensive package, dust-jacketed in Mylar, no less, with the equally expensive-looking author photo printed as a transparency . . . looks like they must be trying to hide something.
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