Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGreek Mythology
IN THE NEWS

Greek Mythology

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 18, 2006
She causes strife by causing arguments among men, by making them think their opinions are right and everyone else's is wrong. It really is just perfect."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | July 13, 2008
Catonsville resident Rosanna Tufts had the most proper, most elite of musical educations, but deep in her soul, she yearned for more earthy entertainments. So Tufts threw off the bonds of her conservatory upbringing and ran off to join the musical theater. "Stage musicals and light opera are my real passion," she says. "They allow me to sing, but also to act and occasionally dance." And, occasionally, they allow Tufts to compose. Excerpts from her rock opera, The Passion of Persephone, are being performed this month at the Capital Fringe Festival in Washington.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 20, 1995
Where would psychiatry be without the Oedipus complex? Where would modern culture and civilization be without Greek mythology? For that matter, where would AXIS Theatre's "Mama, I Can See Again!" be without the Fox network's afternoon cartoon show, "Animaniacs"?Though the last question may seem less consequential than the other two, it's of considerable consequence to this self-proclaimed cartoon musical, which has a script by local writers Kimberley Lynne and Brian Klaas and is premiering at AXIS under Klaas' direction.
TRAVEL
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,Special to The Sun | November 25, 2007
There are blessed moments in every life that are so wildly out-of-the-ordinary, it's as if one has floated free from reality. This past summer, I had one of these rare experiences when I woke up one morning aboard a gorgeous, 60-foot sailboat, Arianna, which was moored in a secluded cove off the Greek island of Rhenia. Was I still dreaming? I couldn't completely believe my good fortune, as I crept up to the deck, dropped my towel and dove into the still, chill waters of the Aegean Sea, naked as the day I was born.
NEWS
By Christina Hernandez and Christina Hernandez,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Bryce Manubay wore a toga and carried a tinfoil trident. Against a painted backdrop of Mount Olympus, the sixth-grader put his creative touch on the role the Greek god Poseidon might have played in the origin of hurricanes, thunderstorms and floods. Because Poseidon didn't like it when people dumped trash into his ocean, Bryce said, "he put a curse on the sea, such that when he commanded it, the water would churn, the skies would darken and Zeus would go crazy with thunderbolts, summoning a storm."
TRAVEL
By Stephen Henderson and Stephen Henderson,Special to The Sun | November 25, 2007
There are blessed moments in every life that are so wildly out-of-the-ordinary, it's as if one has floated free from reality. This past summer, I had one of these rare experiences when I woke up one morning aboard a gorgeous, 60-foot sailboat, Arianna, which was moored in a secluded cove off the Greek island of Rhenia. Was I still dreaming? I couldn't completely believe my good fortune, as I crept up to the deck, dropped my towel and dove into the still, chill waters of the Aegean Sea, naked as the day I was born.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | July 16, 1993
When Dick Thompson's seventh-grade language arts students enter their West Middle School classroom this fall, they'll discover that "Jurassic Park" has taken over.Discussing the sensational movie about dinosaurs brought back life by man is Mr. Thompson's way of introducing his students to Greek mythology."Probably the biggest theme in Greek mythology is that man has certain limits and if you go beyond, you get in trouble. Like the myth of Icarus: Men should not fly," says Mr. Thompson." 'Jurassic Park' is exactly the same concept . . . as it relates to us in the 20th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | January 11, 1991
OrpheusWhere: 1001 E. Pratt St.Hours: 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. As of Feb. 1, the hours will be 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Wednesdays to Sundays.Credit cards: MC, V.Call: 563-1416.Think about Little Italy and you naturally think about all of the restaurants that are somehow crammed into that tiny row-house neighborhood. You don't think about nightclubs in that part of town because there aren't any, or at least there weren't before. Orpheus opened there with the new year.Orpheus may not be large, but hey, this is miniature-scaled Little Italy we're talking about.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 1, 1993
ALLENTOWN, Pa. -- Someday, perhaps, during the opening hours of faraway combat, enemy soldiers may confront the awful specter of a new American warrior.Before them would be a fearsome 6-foot, 7-inch robotic figure, swathed in titanium, with heavy-duty infantry weapons mounted beside its helmet, its malignant silence broken only by the hiss of escaping carbon dioxide gas.It would be TALOS -- named for the bronze, stone-hurling sentry of Greek mythology -- and inside, theoretically, amid microclimate control, periscopic/telescopic optics, laser ranger and a voice-command firing mechanism would be the modern, practically invincible GI.And should TALOS one day prevail on the battlefield, it may be recalled how its simple nativity occurred around the kitchen table of a small, bird-filled, third-floor apartment in Allentown at the hands of a bus driver's son and his wife.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 5, 1995
IN GREEK mythology, the gods were engaged in a spirited rivalry with a race of immortal men on Earth when they created woman out of clay and presented her to man. She was a kind of precursor to the Trojan Horse -- not the innocent gift she seemed.She was called Pandora, and she came with a vessel that she was told not to open. But she did. She loosed misery upon the world, and the men were rendered mortal. Only the gift of Hope remained forever inside Pandora's box.This holiday season, give your teen-age daughter the gift of hope.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 18, 2006
She causes strife by causing arguments among men, by making them think their opinions are right and everyone else's is wrong. It really is just perfect."
NEWS
By Christina Hernandez and Christina Hernandez,SUN STAFF | February 10, 2005
Bryce Manubay wore a toga and carried a tinfoil trident. Against a painted backdrop of Mount Olympus, the sixth-grader put his creative touch on the role the Greek god Poseidon might have played in the origin of hurricanes, thunderstorms and floods. Because Poseidon didn't like it when people dumped trash into his ocean, Bryce said, "he put a curse on the sea, such that when he commanded it, the water would churn, the skies would darken and Zeus would go crazy with thunderbolts, summoning a storm."
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 16, 1997
FRIENDSHIP SQUARES Square Dance Club is sponsoring an American Lung Association of Maryland benefit dance from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. March 23 at North County High School, 10 E. First Ave.The dance program will include square, round and country line dancing. There will be refreshments, door prizes, a raffle and a 50/50 drawing.Admission is $4 a person for square dancers, and a donation will be requested from nondancers. Donald and Linda Hampshire are co-chairs for the event.The Friendship Squares have been dancing together for 25 years.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer | December 5, 1995
IN GREEK mythology, the gods were engaged in a spirited rivalry with a race of immortal men on Earth when they created woman out of clay and presented her to man. She was a kind of precursor to the Trojan Horse -- not the innocent gift she seemed.She was called Pandora, and she came with a vessel that she was told not to open. But she did. She loosed misery upon the world, and the men were rendered mortal. Only the gift of Hope remained forever inside Pandora's box.This holiday season, give your teen-age daughter the gift of hope.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Sun Theater Critic | April 20, 1995
Where would psychiatry be without the Oedipus complex? Where would modern culture and civilization be without Greek mythology? For that matter, where would AXIS Theatre's "Mama, I Can See Again!" be without the Fox network's afternoon cartoon show, "Animaniacs"?Though the last question may seem less consequential than the other two, it's of considerable consequence to this self-proclaimed cartoon musical, which has a script by local writers Kimberley Lynne and Brian Klaas and is premiering at AXIS under Klaas' direction.
NEWS
By Pat Brodowski and Pat Brodowski,Contributing Writer | July 16, 1993
When Dick Thompson's seventh-grade language arts students enter their West Middle School classroom this fall, they'll discover that "Jurassic Park" has taken over.Discussing the sensational movie about dinosaurs brought back life by man is Mr. Thompson's way of introducing his students to Greek mythology."Probably the biggest theme in Greek mythology is that man has certain limits and if you go beyond, you get in trouble. Like the myth of Icarus: Men should not fly," says Mr. Thompson." 'Jurassic Park' is exactly the same concept . . . as it relates to us in the 20th century.
NEWS
By Rosalie Falter and Rosalie Falter,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 16, 1997
FRIENDSHIP SQUARES Square Dance Club is sponsoring an American Lung Association of Maryland benefit dance from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m. March 23 at North County High School, 10 E. First Ave.The dance program will include square, round and country line dancing. There will be refreshments, door prizes, a raffle and a 50/50 drawing.Admission is $4 a person for square dancers, and a donation will be requested from nondancers. Donald and Linda Hampshire are co-chairs for the event.The Friendship Squares have been dancing together for 25 years.
NEWS
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,Sun theater critic | July 13, 2008
Catonsville resident Rosanna Tufts had the most proper, most elite of musical educations, but deep in her soul, she yearned for more earthy entertainments. So Tufts threw off the bonds of her conservatory upbringing and ran off to join the musical theater. "Stage musicals and light opera are my real passion," she says. "They allow me to sing, but also to act and occasionally dance." And, occasionally, they allow Tufts to compose. Excerpts from her rock opera, The Passion of Persephone, are being performed this month at the Capital Fringe Festival in Washington.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | June 1, 1993
ALLENTOWN, Pa. -- Someday, perhaps, during the opening hours of faraway combat, enemy soldiers may confront the awful specter of a new American warrior.Before them would be a fearsome 6-foot, 7-inch robotic figure, swathed in titanium, with heavy-duty infantry weapons mounted beside its helmet, its malignant silence broken only by the hiss of escaping carbon dioxide gas.It would be TALOS -- named for the bronze, stone-hurling sentry of Greek mythology -- and inside, theoretically, amid microclimate control, periscopic/telescopic optics, laser ranger and a voice-command firing mechanism would be the modern, practically invincible GI.And should TALOS one day prevail on the battlefield, it may be recalled how its simple nativity occurred around the kitchen table of a small, bird-filled, third-floor apartment in Allentown at the hands of a bus driver's son and his wife.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | January 11, 1991
OrpheusWhere: 1001 E. Pratt St.Hours: 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Fridays and Saturdays. As of Feb. 1, the hours will be 9 p.m.-2 a.m. Wednesdays to Sundays.Credit cards: MC, V.Call: 563-1416.Think about Little Italy and you naturally think about all of the restaurants that are somehow crammed into that tiny row-house neighborhood. You don't think about nightclubs in that part of town because there aren't any, or at least there weren't before. Orpheus opened there with the new year.Orpheus may not be large, but hey, this is miniature-scaled Little Italy we're talking about.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.