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By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | March 26, 2007
Panagiotis Sgouridis felt right at home in Baltimore yesterday, despite being an ocean away from his native Greece. A former prime minister and current member of the Greek parliament, Sgouridis marched in the Greek Independence Day Mid-Atlantic Parade that wound through Baltimore's Greektown neighborhood. "It just like in Greece," Sgouridis said of the event, "except this is more authentic. In Greece, the military marches and it's very official. Here, it comes from the people."
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ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
The 41st Annual Greek Food & Cultural Festival starts Friday. This is the one at the Greek Cathedral of the Annunciation in Midtown-Belvedere, when everyone sits on the cathedral's steps in the sunshine and stuffs themselves silly. Under the big tent on Preston Street, there's stuff like gyros, souvlaki and fried calamari. But you have to go inside the cathedral and down into the basement for the baked lamb shank, spanakopita, pastitio, roast chicken and stuffed grape leaves. New this year: a Saturday night party in the tent, with a live band.
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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1995
It's three days of almost nonstop Mediterranean food and fun -- music and dancing, sweets and savory dishes, grilled meats, music, movies, cooking demonstrations, tours. In short, it's like a brief trip to Greece, and it happens this weekend at St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in Baltimore.For about 20 years, Greek Orthodox churches in the area have been holding festivals that celebrate Greek culture, from Alexander the Great to stuffed grape leaves to crafts and traditional dance.The Greek festival is just one of nearly a dozen celebrating different ethnic threads in the tapestry of Baltimore's population this summer.
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Chris Emery,Sun reporter | March 26, 2007
Panagiotis Sgouridis felt right at home in Baltimore yesterday, despite being an ocean away from his native Greece. A former prime minister and current member of the Greek parliament, Sgouridis marched in the Greek Independence Day Mid-Atlantic Parade that wound through Baltimore's Greektown neighborhood. "It just like in Greece," Sgouridis said of the event, "except this is more authentic. In Greece, the military marches and it's very official. Here, it comes from the people."
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 24, 1991
If the "Gold of Greece" exhibit that opens at the Walters Art Gallery today contains some of the most exquisite jewelry ever made (and it does), surely it contains some of the ugliest as well. It just goes to show that nobody has matched the golden age of Greece, not even the Greeks themselves.A selection of about 200 works of gold jewelry and ornaments from the Benaki Museum in Athens, the exhibit covers a grand sweep of almost 35 centuries, from the Mycenean period a millennium before the age of Periclean Athens down to the late 19th century.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 9, 1994
It's Sunday morning and the electric chime on the roof of St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in East Baltimore is calling parishioners to the Divine Liturgy.Grandparents, parents and their children walk to the South Ponca Street church, the center of this Highlandtown community's religious life.The parishioners live on Lehigh, Mason, Newkirk, Oldham, Ponca, Quail, Rappola, Savage, Tolna and Umbra streets, south and west of the old Baltimore City Hospitals campus. Many call this section Greektown.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 1, 2012
The 41st Annual Greek Food & Cultural Festival starts Friday. This is the one at the Greek Cathedral of the Annunciation in Midtown-Belvedere, when everyone sits on the cathedral's steps in the sunshine and stuffs themselves silly. Under the big tent on Preston Street, there's stuff like gyros, souvlaki and fried calamari. But you have to go inside the cathedral and down into the basement for the baked lamb shank, spanakopita, pastitio, roast chicken and stuffed grape leaves. New this year: a Saturday night party in the tent, with a live band.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | November 13, 2005
Alice Davis loves to reminisce about her 1988 trip to Greece. "There is something about the light there that's different," she said. "I love to be reminded of the trip." She went looking for reminders of her trip at the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation, which is holding its 34th annual Greek Village Festival this weekend. The event is part of a yearlong celebration of the Greek Orthodox congregation's 100th anniversary. The cathedral itself, built in 1889 to house a Protestant congregation, was set to be demolished in 1937, with a gasoline station slated to take its place.
NEWS
By Lauren Harner and Lauren Harner,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2004
Greektown resembles many other Baltimore neighborhoods - rows of houses with children playing on the sidewalks while adults look on from front stoops. On several homes, the Greek flag hangs next to the American flag, a symbol of merging new and old cultures. Apart from the flags and the Acropolis Restaurant across the street, there isn't much to distinguish this section of Highlandtown at the end of Eastern Avenue from surrounding communities. That's about to change. On two walls facing the Metropolitan Church of God, a coat of light blue and white paint marks the beginning of a mural, which has been commissioned by the city to celebrate Greek-American culture in Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | May 22, 2005
There may never be another three operatic tenors packing the combined vocal and star power of Luciano Pavarotti, Placido Domingo and Jose Carreras, but there are at least three highly marketable singers who have demonstrated an exceptional ability to stir the public. Call them the poperatic tenors. Heading the list of these mass-appeal vocalists, who cross back and forth between classical and pop idioms easily and who generate unusually effusive fans, is Andrea Bocelli. The blind Italian singer soared to fame and fortune in the 1990s, given an extra boost by heavy exposure on American public television.
NEWS
By CHRIS EMERY and CHRIS EMERY,SUN REPORTER | November 13, 2005
Alice Davis loves to reminisce about her 1988 trip to Greece. "There is something about the light there that's different," she said. "I love to be reminded of the trip." She went looking for reminders of her trip at the Greek Orthodox Cathedral of the Annunciation, which is holding its 34th annual Greek Village Festival this weekend. The event is part of a yearlong celebration of the Greek Orthodox congregation's 100th anniversary. The cathedral itself, built in 1889 to house a Protestant congregation, was set to be demolished in 1937, with a gasoline station slated to take its place.
NEWS
By Lauren Harner and Lauren Harner,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2004
Greektown resembles many other Baltimore neighborhoods - rows of houses with children playing on the sidewalks while adults look on from front stoops. On several homes, the Greek flag hangs next to the American flag, a symbol of merging new and old cultures. Apart from the flags and the Acropolis Restaurant across the street, there isn't much to distinguish this section of Highlandtown at the end of Eastern Avenue from surrounding communities. That's about to change. On two walls facing the Metropolitan Church of God, a coat of light blue and white paint marks the beginning of a mural, which has been commissioned by the city to celebrate Greek-American culture in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,Sun Staff Writer | June 7, 1995
It's three days of almost nonstop Mediterranean food and fun -- music and dancing, sweets and savory dishes, grilled meats, music, movies, cooking demonstrations, tours. In short, it's like a brief trip to Greece, and it happens this weekend at St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in Baltimore.For about 20 years, Greek Orthodox churches in the area have been holding festivals that celebrate Greek culture, from Alexander the Great to stuffed grape leaves to crafts and traditional dance.The Greek festival is just one of nearly a dozen celebrating different ethnic threads in the tapestry of Baltimore's population this summer.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | June 9, 1994
It's Sunday morning and the electric chime on the roof of St. Nicholas Greek Orthodox Church in East Baltimore is calling parishioners to the Divine Liturgy.Grandparents, parents and their children walk to the South Ponca Street church, the center of this Highlandtown community's religious life.The parishioners live on Lehigh, Mason, Newkirk, Oldham, Ponca, Quail, Rappola, Savage, Tolna and Umbra streets, south and west of the old Baltimore City Hospitals campus. Many call this section Greektown.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | November 24, 1991
If the "Gold of Greece" exhibit that opens at the Walters Art Gallery today contains some of the most exquisite jewelry ever made (and it does), surely it contains some of the ugliest as well. It just goes to show that nobody has matched the golden age of Greece, not even the Greeks themselves.A selection of about 200 works of gold jewelry and ornaments from the Benaki Museum in Athens, the exhibit covers a grand sweep of almost 35 centuries, from the Mycenean period a millennium before the age of Periclean Athens down to the late 19th century.
ENTERTAINMENT
By [ANDREA GROSSMAN] | November 8, 2007
Waterfowl fest The lowdown -- Don't miss the 37th annual Waterfowl Festival in Easton this weekend. Browse through sculptures, carvings, photographs and wildlife paintings at 12 venues. Watch fly-fishing demonstrations and world championship calling contests. If you go -- The Waterfowl Festival will be held 10 a.m.-6 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Sunday. Admission is $12 tomorrow and Saturday; $10 Sunday; and $24 for multiple days. Children 12 and younger accompanied by an adult are admitted free.
NEWS
By Kate Smith, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2010
Despina Siskos, a faith-driven teenager who was home-schooled after becoming ill in 2008, died Aug. 17 while waiting for a lung donor at Philadelphia's Children's Hospital. The Rosedale resident was 15. Ms. Siskos was diagnosed with nonspecific interstitial lung disease in 2008 and had been on the organ donor list since August 2009. The daughter of a painter and a finance worker, Ms. Siskos was born in 1995 and raised in Rosedale. She attended Red House Run Elementary and Parkville Middle School.
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