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By RAY FRAGER and RAY FRAGER,ray.frager@baltsun.com | December 12, 2008
In a current country song, Jamey Johnson sings the refrain, "You should have seen it in color," referring to a grandfather's vivid memories of times past captured in black-and-white photographs. Like those old photos, most documents of the legendary Baltimore Colts-New York Giants 1958 NFL title game - the game that launched pro football into American sports ascendancy - have existed in black and white. But producers of ESPN's documentary The Greatest Game Ever Played (9 p.m. tomorrow)
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SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
When the Orioles signed Nelson Cruz to a club-friendly one-year, $8 million deal in February, executive vice president Dan Duquette was quick to point out Cruz's postseason accomplishments. And while the Orioles have reaped a huge payoff from their investment in Cruz - he led the majors with 40 homers and at times, carried the club on his broad shoulders - the 34-year-old slugger brings huge playoff credentials into the Orioles' American League Division Series matchup against the Detroit Tigers.
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SPORTS
By James H. Jackson | June 4, 1991
Mount Washington Club outlasted Chesapeake Lacrosse Club on Saturday at Norris Field in what many say was the longest lacrosse game in history.Lou Delligatti's unassisted goal 1 minute, 19 seconds into the sixth four-minute overtime period gave the Mounties a 15-14 victory over the Peakers and the Southern Division championship in the United States Club Lacrosse Association. The game took 101 minutes, 19 seconds."The actual time was more than three hours," said Mount Washington coach Skip Lichtfuss.
SPORTS
By Jeff Seidel and For The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2014
The Blast defense and goalie William Vanzela made life very tough for the Rochester Lancers on Saturday. Rochester discovered why the Blast came into the matchup as the Major Indoor Soccer League's top defense. Vanzela made 12 saves, and the defense smothered the Lancers offense as the Blast scored a 17-2 victory over Rochester before an announced 6,986 at Baltimore Arena. This victory kept the Blast (10-3) a half game behind the first-place Milwaukee Wave (10-2), which beat the St. Louis Ambush on Saturday.
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE and RICK MAESE,rick.maese@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
Fifty years ago, an undersized defensive back named Andy Nelson climbed into a car alongside a 25-year-old, fresh-faced quarterback. Was it a Pontiac? A Chevrolet? Tricky thing about time: Just as easily as it can help shape a legacy, it can fade a memory. Nelson and his friend drove together to Memorial Stadium, where they would catch a bus to the airport, where they would board a plane for New York, where they would make history just a couple of days later. If there were only a way to get into his head.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | March 30, 1992
Was it the greatest college basketball game ever played?That was the question being asked moments after Christian Laettner's 16-foot jump shot beat the overtime buzzer and enabled Duke to beat Kentucky, 104-103, in the NCAA East Regional final Saturday night at the Spectrum in Philadelphia.The shot by Laettner, which came after he caught a 75-foot inbounds pass from Grant Hill, followed an even more sensational 14-footer by Wildcats guard Sean Woods with 2.2 seconds to play. Woods drove around Bobby Hurley and threw in a one-handed bank shot over Laettner.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | December 28, 2008
Too bad we can't jump in the car today and drive to Johnny Unitas' Golden Arm restaurant in Rodgers Forge and celebrate the 50th anniversary of the 1958 championship game between the Baltimore Colts and New York Giants with a hearty meal and a couple of cold ones. But don't bother steering for the York Road Plaza restaurant. If you do, you'll only be disappointed. A Radio Shack electronics store sits where the fabled restaurant once stood. Unitas opened the restaurant in 1968 with defensive back Bobby Boyd and owned it for the next 20 years, until he sold it to Bill Grauel in 1988.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
The image did not add up in Raymond Berry's mind. There he was, sharing a moment of purest fulfillment with his Baltimore Colts teammates as they left Yankee Stadium on Dec. 28, 1958. World champions! They could call themselves that after beating the New York Giants in a tense overtime before a huge national television audience. And yet, there stood National Football League commissioner Bert Bell, quietly weeping. "I didn't comprehend why, but the memory stuck with me," Berry said recently from his home in Tennessee.
SPORTS
By Bill Ordine and Bill Ordine,bill.ordine@baltsun.com | December 27, 2008
It matters not that their gaits are slowed and frames stooped, the result of ancient wounds and the passing of decades. These former Baltimore Colts - the 1958 Baltimore Colts - are arrested in the collective mind's eye of generations of football fans in the flower of their strength and swiftness and fortitude. And last night, some of them gathered once again as they did nearly 50 years ago at frozen Yankee Stadium, where they won the NFL championship, 23-17, in sudden-death overtime. But instead of preparing to take on the New York Football Giants - as their foes were often called back then - in a struggle none of them could have imagined would come to be known as "The Greatest Game Ever Played," these old Colts were assembled in the club level at M&T Bank Stadium in a warm spirit of fraternal bonhomie known only to those who have joined together in a great struggle.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,Sun Reporter | February 27, 2007
In a photo capturing the most famous moment of George Preas' football career, he's not even there. The picture, from 1958, shows Colts fullback Alan Ameche blasting through a hole for the winning touchdown in Baltimore's 23-17 sudden-death NFL championship victory. Preas, a lineman, helped blaze that trail - though he's missing from the famous photo, having already done the work. "That picture sums up George," teammate Alex Sandusky said. "He did a hell of a job for years and nobody knew it, except for the guys who played with him."
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2014
When the winter Olympics gets underway next month in Sochi, Russia, Under Armour's logo will be seen by millions of viewers around the globe as the Baltimore-based brand sponsors two U.S. teams and another from Canada. The Olympic sponsorships - the greatest exposure yet for Under Armour at any winter games - could pay off not only in brand awareness, but in stronger sales and profits, company officials say. They hope wins by sponsored athletes or even just the exposure will reinforce the company's mantra of "making all athletes better" in consumers' minds.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 26, 2013
Arthur Anthony "Art" DeCarlo Sr., a defensive back for the Baltimore Colts who played on the fabled 1958 championship team, died of complications from dementia Dec. 21 at his home in Birmingham, Ala. The former Ellicott City resident was 82. Born in Youngstown, Ohio, he was the son of Josephina and Antonio DeCarlo, a contractor. He was raised by an older brother after the death of his parents. He worked in a steel mill the summer after his senior year in high school and had offers to play for Ohio colleges.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 24, 2010
William Louis "Bill" Miller, an original member of the Colts Marching Band and a retired educator, died Sept. 15 of myelodysplastic syndrome at Mandarin House Hospice in Harwood. Mr. Miller, who had homes in Columbia and Annapolis, was 77. Mr. Miller, whose parents owned Miller's Hardware at East Baltimore and Clinton streets, was born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown. He was a 1950 graduate of the old Patterson Park High School and earned a bachelor's degree in education in 1954 from what is now Towson University.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and Mike Klingaman,mike.klingaman@baltsun.com | December 20, 2009
Fifty years ago, the Baltimore Colts rallied to win a world championship over the New York Giants before 57,545 jubilant fans at Memorial Stadium. Go on, scratch your head. The 1958 title game is burned into our brains: 23-17, sudden-death, Ameche's plunge, the stampede at the airport. But the sequel, on Dec. 27, 1959? Half a century later, who can recall the cast, the Colts' comeback, or the score? Not even the players, it seems. "Don't remember it at all," said Hall of Famer Lenny Moore, who caught a 60-yard touchdown pass in the 31-16 victory that day. "Man, oh man. Can you believe that?
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | December 28, 2008
News item: The Ravens could clinch a playoff berth before they take the field for today's late-afternoon game against the Jacksonville Jaguars if the New England Patriots lose their 1 p.m. season finale in Buffalo. My take: That would be nice because there are several banged-up Ravens players who would look good relaxing on the bench all afternoon, but I wouldn't hold my breath. Related news item: Patriots linebacker Tedy Bruschi is expected to miss today's game against the Bills, and defensive end Richard Seymour is out. My take: Losing two key defensive players would make it that much tougher to win on the road, but I agree with John Harbaugh.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | December 28, 2008
The image did not add up in Raymond Berry's mind. There he was, sharing a moment of purest fulfillment with his Baltimore Colts teammates as they left Yankee Stadium on Dec. 28, 1958. World champions! They could call themselves that after beating the New York Giants in a tense overtime before a huge national television audience. And yet, there stood National Football League commissioner Bert Bell, quietly weeping. "I didn't comprehend why, but the memory stuck with me," Berry said recently from his home in Tennessee.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
Like a few thousand other Baltimore fans counting down the days to Super Bowl XXXV, Brian Cooper can't help feeling as if he's been here before. Depending on how you look at it, he has. It was 1958 when his parents, Joseph and Annette Cooper, traveled to New York to watch the Baltimore Colts and New York Giants battle for pro football's championship in what became known as "The Greatest Game Ever Played." They left their two young sons at home, but they had company of sorts: Annette was four months' pregnant with Brian.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler | October 3, 1991
SORRY, Colts fans. That wasn't the greatest game ever played. It was the greatest game ever played in football, but the greatest game ever played in sports was 40 years ago today. It took place at the Polo Grounds in New York, and the Giants won the National League pennant over the Dodgers, 5-4.Bobby Thompson, of course, won it with a homer off Ralph Branca, while announcer Russ Hodges shouted, "The Giants win the pennant! The Giants win the pennant! . . ." It was a shout heard 'round the world (as we knew it then)
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