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By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 11, 1997
Jaston Williams and Joe Sears used to call them "Tunatics," and their numbers have increased."Tunatics" are the fine folk of Tuna, Texas, a fictitious town created by actors Williams and Sears and writer and director Ed Howard in their play "Greater Tuna." The latest incarnations are actors Roger Buchanan and Jimi Kinstle, who are doing a fan-tuna-tastic job at the Vagabond Players, under Steve Goldklang's swift direction.With the help of seven backstage personnel, who assist them in and out of designer Mary Bova's heavily Velcro'd costumes, Buchanan and Kinstle depict 20 Tunatics during a day in the life of small-town America.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK | August 13, 2000
It's Christmas in August at Totem Pole Playhouse. The summer theater in Fayetteville, Pa., is wrapping up its 50th anniversary season with "A Tuna Christmas," the second installment of Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard's continuing saga of life in the fictitious third-smallest town in Texas. The two-man show may be about Texas, but when it opens Tuesday at Totem Pole, it'll have a bit of Baltimore flair. That's because director Carl Schurr, and half of the cast, actor Wil Love, are Baltimoreans; the other half, Paul DeBoy, is a former Baltimorean.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 30, 1999
The "Tuna"-tics are back. Washington's Kennedy Center is serving up what it calls "a third helping of 'Tuna.' " Specifically, Joe Sears and Jaston Williams, the two-man team that portrays almost the entire fictitious town of Tuna, Texas, will present "Red, White and Tuna," the third installment of their Tuna trilogy, in the Eisenhower Theater, beginning Tuesday.In December, Sears and Williams brought a little early holiday cheer to the Mechanic Theatre with "A Tuna Christmas," Part 2 of the trilogy that began more than 16 years ago with "Greater Tuna."
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 30, 1999
The "Tuna"-tics are back. Washington's Kennedy Center is serving up what it calls "a third helping of 'Tuna.' " Specifically, Joe Sears and Jaston Williams, the two-man team that portrays almost the entire fictitious town of Tuna, Texas, will present "Red, White and Tuna," the third installment of their Tuna trilogy, in the Eisenhower Theater, beginning Tuesday.In December, Sears and Williams brought a little early holiday cheer to the Mechanic Theatre with "A Tuna Christmas," Part 2 of the trilogy that began more than 16 years ago with "Greater Tuna."
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 1996
THE PROFESSIONAL SUMMER COMPANY in residence at Western Maryland College is stirring up a lot of fun with new productions at the Theatre on the Hill (TOTH)."The Princess and the Pea" is a production that children are sure to enjoy. This version of the classic fable includes audience participation and original music.The prince's search for a true princess is complicated when a young woman claiming to be a princess has to be tested.The test? Can she feel the discomfort of a single pea through a pile of bedding?
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 20, 1997
Tuna will be back on the menu for the holidays beginning Tuesday when "A Tuna Christmas" returns to Washington for a two-week engagement at the Warner Theatre.Capitalizing on the formula they perfected in "Greater Tuna," co-writers and co-stars Jaston Williams and Joe Sears again portray two dozen inhabitants of the third smallest town in Texas. In this case, as the title suggests, the Christmas festivities are high on the agenda of everyone from Didi Snavely, proprietor of the local used weapons boutique, to radio station OKKK announcers Arles Struvie and Thurston Wheelis.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. WYNN ROUSUCK | August 13, 2000
It's Christmas in August at Totem Pole Playhouse. The summer theater in Fayetteville, Pa., is wrapping up its 50th anniversary season with "A Tuna Christmas," the second installment of Jaston Williams, Joe Sears and Ed Howard's continuing saga of life in the fictitious third-smallest town in Texas. The two-man show may be about Texas, but when it opens Tuesday at Totem Pole, it'll have a bit of Baltimore flair. That's because director Carl Schurr, and half of the cast, actor Wil Love, are Baltimoreans; the other half, Paul DeBoy, is a former Baltimorean.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 7, 1998
You might say that Joe Sears and Jaston Williams have become prisoners of Tuna, Texas. Sixteen years ago, the Texas-based actors created a two-man show called "Greater Tuna," in which they played nearly all the residents of the fictitious third-smallest town in Texas.By now, the show, which started out as a party skit, has practically become an industry. Sears and Williams tour 10 months out of every year, while numerous other casts -- sometimes comprising a half-dozen or more actors -- continue to play the denizens of Tuna in separate productions around the country.
NEWS
March 28, 1997
Theatre on the Hill has organized a theatrical smorgasbord that will be presented in a one-night extravaganza at 7 p.m. April 5 in Alumni Hall at Western Maryland College.Gala '97, celebrating the professional company's 15 seasons in residence at the college, will feature past performers as well as a sneak preview of this summer's productions.Ray Ficca, star of TOTH's "Greater Tuna" and "Barnum," will be the host.Sally Thorner, news anchorwoman at WJZ-TV (Channel 13), will be the evening's guest.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | May 7, 1995
Three women of three generationsLee Blessing's "Eleemosynary" -- a play about three unusual women from different generations -- opens Friday at Fell's Point Corner Theatre, 251 S. Ann St.Kate Green, Lynne Sigler and Michelle Conroy portray the trio of women, under Anne O'Reilly's direction. The title is a spelling-bee word meaning "charitable." ("Eleemosynary" replaces Fell's Point Corner's previously announced production of "Shirley Valentine.")Show times are 8 p.m. Fridays and Saturdays and 2 p.m. Sundays, through June 18. Tickets are $10. For more information, call (410)
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 7, 1998
You might say that Joe Sears and Jaston Williams have become prisoners of Tuna, Texas. Sixteen years ago, the Texas-based actors created a two-man show called "Greater Tuna," in which they played nearly all the residents of the fictitious third-smallest town in Texas.By now, the show, which started out as a party skit, has practically become an industry. Sears and Williams tour 10 months out of every year, while numerous other casts -- sometimes comprising a half-dozen or more actors -- continue to play the denizens of Tuna in separate productions around the country.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 20, 1997
Tuna will be back on the menu for the holidays beginning Tuesday when "A Tuna Christmas" returns to Washington for a two-week engagement at the Warner Theatre.Capitalizing on the formula they perfected in "Greater Tuna," co-writers and co-stars Jaston Williams and Joe Sears again portray two dozen inhabitants of the third smallest town in Texas. In this case, as the title suggests, the Christmas festivities are high on the agenda of everyone from Didi Snavely, proprietor of the local used weapons boutique, to radio station OKKK announcers Arles Struvie and Thurston Wheelis.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | April 11, 1997
Jaston Williams and Joe Sears used to call them "Tunatics," and their numbers have increased."Tunatics" are the fine folk of Tuna, Texas, a fictitious town created by actors Williams and Sears and writer and director Ed Howard in their play "Greater Tuna." The latest incarnations are actors Roger Buchanan and Jimi Kinstle, who are doing a fan-tuna-tastic job at the Vagabond Players, under Steve Goldklang's swift direction.With the help of seven backstage personnel, who assist them in and out of designer Mary Bova's heavily Velcro'd costumes, Buchanan and Kinstle depict 20 Tunatics during a day in the life of small-town America.
NEWS
By Lois Szymanski and Lois Szymanski,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 1996
THE PROFESSIONAL SUMMER COMPANY in residence at Western Maryland College is stirring up a lot of fun with new productions at the Theatre on the Hill (TOTH)."The Princess and the Pea" is a production that children are sure to enjoy. This version of the classic fable includes audience participation and original music.The prince's search for a true princess is complicated when a young woman claiming to be a princess has to be tested.The test? Can she feel the discomfort of a single pea through a pile of bedding?
NEWS
By Nelson Pressley and Nelson Pressley,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 25, 2000
Columbia Community Players president Bob Russell describes Larry Shue's "The Foreigner" as "a prop-intensive, tech-intensive show." It could not have come as good news, then, when Russell (who is directing the show) was told that he couldn't move the set for "The Foreigner" onto the stage at the Wilde Lake Village Green's Slayton House until last Sunday night. He had expected to move the set in two days earlier. The delay will have cost Russell a dress rehearsal by the time the popular comedy opens its three-weekend run tomorrownight.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | December 10, 1998
There's been a crime spree in the tiny town of Tuna, Texas. A criminal known only as the Christmas Phantom has been defacing holiday displays -- loosening the lights on the official town Christmas tree and putting boxer shorts on wise men and ERA buttons on statues of the Virgin Mary.But the biggest crime would be not going to the Mechanic Theatre this week to see Joe Sears and Jaston Williams in their two-man, tour-de-force holiday comedy, "A Tuna Christmas," co-written with director Ed Howard.
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