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By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | November 30, 1994
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Russia is expected to advance a new initiative on Bosnia that would grant the Bosnian Serbs the same constitutional rights as the other two warring parties -- the Muslims and Croats.The plan will be presented Friday in Brussels, Belgium, at a meeting of foreign ministers from Britain, France, Germany, Russia and the United States, according to diplomatic sources. The five powers comprise the so-called Contact Group on Bosnia.Elements of the plan have emerged here after two days of talks between Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev and Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic.
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NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 10, 2001
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - Slobodan Milosevic, the imprisoned former strongman of Yugoslavia, would not have to walk far from his jail to see what calamity was wrought by his decade of bloody-minded nationalism. Less than 100 yards from the iron gates of his prison, he could walk on a potholed street, cluttered with crumbling houses that provide the unmistakable signs of poverty in a shrunken state $13 billion in debt. Nearby, a police car, a rusted Yugo painted blue and white, is occupied by a couple of police officers whose mere presence only a few months earlier would have struck fear into the heart of almost any citizen under Milosevic's regime.
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NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 26, 1993
Paris. -- The diabolizing of the parties to the Yugoslav war has gone very far. Atrocity propaganda is a dangerous weapon, with a tendency to recoil against those who employ it.The Communist leadership of the old Yugoslavia, led by Slobodan Milosevic, preached hatred of its neighbors to incite latent Serbian nationalism and thus keep itself in power while Communist regimes elsewhere were falling.It now cannot control the irrational and extremist forces it set at work among Serbian minorities in Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | March 28, 1996
PARIS -- Peace has provided Slobodan Milosevic, president of Serbia, with means and motive for strengthening his control over the successor Yugoslav state, composed of Serbia plus Montenegro.This is one result of the Dayton agreements on Bosnian peace. Mr. Milosevic was the man the Western powers had to deal with if they expected to end -- or suspend -- the war. They might otherwise have sought his indictment by the international war crimes tribunal now at work in The Hague.Mr. Milosevic is the man who started the war (with considerable help from others in the former Yugoslavia)
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 23, 1992
Paris -- The present Serbian government's program to make a ''greater'' Serbia, incorporating large parts of Bosnia-Herzegovina as well as of Croatia, seems on its way to success. There is no one to stop it.The Serbian-dominated ex-federal army is the principal military force in the region, possessing heavy weapons. The newly arrived U.N. peacekeeping force and the European Community's observers are being brushed aside. Neither have the means nor the mission to fight Serbia.The Serbs' reward will be a big and economically crippled Serbian-Montenegrin union, facing the prospect of insurrection by the 1.2 million Albanians of Kosovo, whom the Serb authorities now dominate and oppress.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | April 10, 2001
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia - Slobodan Milosevic, the imprisoned former strongman of Yugoslavia, would not have to walk far from his jail to see what calamity was wrought by his decade of bloody-minded nationalism. Less than 100 yards from the iron gates of his prison, he could walk on a potholed street, cluttered with crumbling houses that provide the unmistakable signs of poverty in a shrunken state $13 billion in debt. Nearby, a police car, a rusted Yugo painted blue and white, is occupied by a couple of police officers whose mere presence only a few months earlier would have struck fear into the heart of almost any citizen under Milosevic's regime.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 10, 1993
Q. How do you punish the Serbs for the rest of their lives? A Give them Greater Serbia.Bring back George Bush. He'd find a way to bomb Bosnia, or somewhere.
NEWS
April 21, 1992
The invasion of Bosnia-Herzegovina by the Yugoslav federal army and Serbian irregulars is an international aggression and a human rights abuse. Coming after U.S. and European recognition of Bosnia-Herzegovina's sovereign independence and after the torturous world efforts to end the similar fighting in Croatia, this invasion affronts the United Nations, Europe and all who wish Yugoslavian peoples well.Bosnia-Herzegovina is Yugoslavia writ small. Its 4.4 million people include no ethnic majority, only rival minorities.
NEWS
May 2, 1992
The self-congratulations of statesmen for having made war in Europe impossible were premature. Part of Europe is at war. The internationalization of the conflicts in Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina was completed Monday when federal Yugoslavia proclaimed itself smaller, consisting only of former Serbia and Montenegro, without territorial claims on neighbors. Therefore the federal troops outside this new entity must be on foreign soil. Those shooting and shot at must be at war.The new, two-republic Yugoslavia has half the area and population of the old. Most of its people are Serbs.
NEWS
January 27, 1992
European recognition of Croatia and Slovenia should tip the scales in Croatia's war for independence. Seven months after its declaration, Croatia is acknowledged to be a nation deserving the protection of others, able to buy and to borrow. What was a civil war is made international and more dangerous, but Croatia's survival seems assured.The United States did not go along because this was a hasty action, based on Germany's sympathy for the parts of Yugoslavia that were once governed by Austria.
NEWS
March 4, 1996
ETHNIC PARTITION is the order of the day in Bosnia. Hopes that Serbs and Muslims can live as neighbors are going smash in the suburbs of Sarajevo as Bosnian Serbs join a mass exodus encouraged by their leaders and goaded by the Muslin-led government. Hopes that Croats and Muslims could share an undivided Mostar lasted little more than an hour as animosity erupted among the two groups supposedly joined together in a U.S.-sponsored federation."The entire aim of the peace process was to start trying to bring people together," laments Carl Bildt, director of the civilian part of the Dayton agreement.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Special to The Sun | November 30, 1994
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- Russia is expected to advance a new initiative on Bosnia that would grant the Bosnian Serbs the same constitutional rights as the other two warring parties -- the Muslims and Croats.The plan will be presented Friday in Brussels, Belgium, at a meeting of foreign ministers from Britain, France, Germany, Russia and the United States, according to diplomatic sources. The five powers comprise the so-called Contact Group on Bosnia.Elements of the plan have emerged here after two days of talks between Russian Foreign Minister Andrei V. Kozyrev and Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic.
NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | June 25, 1993
Tirana, AlbaniaIN A country of people gnarled by their tortured history, Sali Berisha is tall, broad-shouldered and handsome. In a land doomed for 500 years to live under one bizarre dictator after another, he is one of the Balkans' few genuine democrats.In a country doomed for nearly 40 years to live under the rabidly isolationist regime of brutal Stalinist Enver Hoxha -- whose philosophy consisted of brute force and an Albania closed off from the world -- this first democratic president of Albania is sometimes called the "Vaclav Havel of the Balkans."
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | May 25, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- A major split in the Yugoslavian army poses a new threat to Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic.Diplomats said that Mr. Milosevic's policy reversal on Bosnia had created panic within the armed forces but that no single faction at this stage appeared strong enough to take charge.The split became public with a series of scandalous stories in the news media. But their tabloid flavor and entertainment value have done little to mask the seriousness of the problem, which also deepens the division between Serbs in Serbia and Serbs in Bosnia.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | May 21, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- When it comes to Balkan politics, even the evidently simple things are neither evident nor simple.Consider Slobodan Milosevic. A man until recently described as a ruthless tyrant bent on territorial aggrandizement and the creation of a "Greater Serbia," he suddenly has become a miraculous convert to the peace plan for Bosnia fashioned by Cyrus R. Vance and Lord Owen.But is he for real? Or is this merely a piece of theater -- more subterfuge to remove the disgrace of the Bosnian war from himself while privately encouraging his Bosnian clones to continue defying the international community?
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | May 10, 1993
Q. How do you punish the Serbs for the rest of their lives? A Give them Greater Serbia.Bring back George Bush. He'd find a way to bomb Bosnia, or somewhere.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Contributing Writer | May 25, 1993
BELGRADE, Yugoslavia -- A major split in the Yugoslavian army poses a new threat to Serbian President Slobodan Milosevic.Diplomats said that Mr. Milosevic's policy reversal on Bosnia had created panic within the armed forces but that no single faction at this stage appeared strong enough to take charge.The split became public with a series of scandalous stories in the news media. But their tabloid flavor and entertainment value have done little to mask the seriousness of the problem, which also deepens the division between Serbs in Serbia and Serbs in Bosnia.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | March 28, 1996
PARIS -- Peace has provided Slobodan Milosevic, president of Serbia, with means and motive for strengthening his control over the successor Yugoslav state, composed of Serbia plus Montenegro.This is one result of the Dayton agreements on Bosnian peace. Mr. Milosevic was the man the Western powers had to deal with if they expected to end -- or suspend -- the war. They might otherwise have sought his indictment by the international war crimes tribunal now at work in The Hague.Mr. Milosevic is the man who started the war (with considerable help from others in the former Yugoslavia)
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | April 26, 1993
Paris. -- The diabolizing of the parties to the Yugoslav war has gone very far. Atrocity propaganda is a dangerous weapon, with a tendency to recoil against those who employ it.The Communist leadership of the old Yugoslavia, led by Slobodan Milosevic, preached hatred of its neighbors to incite latent Serbian nationalism and thus keep itself in power while Communist regimes elsewhere were falling.It now cannot control the irrational and extremist forces it set at work among Serbian minorities in Croatia and Bosnia-Herzegovina.
NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | August 27, 1992
Paris.--The international conference on Yugoslavia, which opened Wednesday in London, is more likely than not to give victory to Serbia and to the practices of aggression and ethnic purge.These will be provisional victories, since to complete their creation of a Greater Serbia, the Serbs must also purge Kosovo of its 1.2 million Albanians, and drive out the Hungarian and other minorities from the formerly self-governing province of Vojvodina and all the rest of Serbia. Macedonia must be dealt with, and this -- like the purge of Kosovo -- risks provoking another Balkan war. The Serbs will also have to hold their conquests against eventual Croatian and Bosnian counterattacks.
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