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By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2012
Jarnetta Kroh, a Greater Baltimore Medical Center philanthropist who assisted her husband in his import car servicing business, died Nov. 25 of chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder at her home in Laguna Hills, Calif. She was 81 and had lived in the Rockland section of Baltimore County for many years. Jarnetta Althea Jarvis was born in Spencer, W.Va., and raised in Walton, W.Va., where her father was postmaster. Her mother was a secretary to a May Co. department store executive.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Dr. Norman R. Freeman Jr., a retired internist who had cared for Baltimore Colts players for two decades, died Friday at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson of complications from a fall. He was 97. The son of Norman R. Freeman, a window treatment manufacturing company executive, and Marie P. Freeman, a homemaker, Norman Randolph Freeman Jr. was born in Baltimore and raised on Northway in Guilford. After graduating from Gilman School in 1935, he earned his bachelor's degree from Princeton University in 1939 and his medical degree from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in 1943.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2011
Outdoor festivals like the Preakness can mean hours in the harsh rays. Most people know that the sun can be damaging yet still don't adequately cover up. May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month, and Dr. Mark Lowitt, a dermatologist at Greater Baltimore Medical Center, answered questions about sunscreen and avoiding damage. What is the best ingredient (and best number of SPF) to look for in a sunscreen? For most people, we recommend sunscreens with an SPF of 30. For people who are at especially high risk for skin cancer, such as those with a past history of skin cancer, those with extremely fair and easily burned skin, or those with many moles, we recommend sunscreens with SPF of 50 or greater.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Patricia B. "Pat" Tatar, a former Bank of Baltimore official, died of complications from pneumonia Sept. 24 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Towson resident was 83. Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Max Pechersky and the former Catherine Shiffman. She was a graduate of Forest Park High School and initially worked at the old Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. In the early 1970s, she moved to Maple Shade, N.J., and was a regional Hallmark card, toy, puzzle and Christmas ornament representative.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 16, 2013
For Sean Hearn, there was no better way to spend Father's Day than sweating through a hilly 5K road race in Towson, pushing sons Shane and Wyatt in a double-wide stroller. A little more than four years ago, Shane spent 10 days in the neonatal intensive care unit at Greater Baltimore Medical Center before going home to Hunt Valley on Mother's Day. "As he laid in the NICU, I made lots of promises, and one was to participate in this," Hearn said shortly after finishing GBMC's 25th annual Fathers Day 5K race.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 20, 2013
Jeanne H. Baetjer, a founder who served as the first president of the board of trustees of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, died Sept. 11 of cancer at her Stevenson home. She was 91. "Jeanne was one of the founders of the Greater Baltimore Medical Center, and it is obvious that we have lost someone who was very special," said Dr. John Chessare, GBMC HealthCare president and CEO. "She was a very strong leader, and without her ability to respectfully put issues on the table, GBMC would not exist today," said Dr. Chessare.
NEWS
Jacques Kelly and The Baltimore Sun | October 13, 2014
Patricia B. "Pat" Tatar, a former Bank of Baltimore official, died of complications from pneumonia Sept. 24 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. The Towson resident was 83. Born in Baltimore, she was the daughter of Max Pechersky and the former Catherine Shiffman. She was a graduate of Forest Park High School and initially worked at the old Chesapeake & Potomac Telephone Co. In the early 1970s, she moved to Maple Shade, N.J., and was a regional Hallmark card, toy, puzzle and Christmas ornament representative.
NEWS
April 17, 2013
Baltimore County Police have identified the 39-year-old man killed Tuesday while performing lawn maintenance at North Charles Street and Old Willow Way in Towson. The victim was identified as Noe Rodriguez Alverto, of Middle River. At 10:53 a.m. Tuesday, police and fire units responded to a call for a pedestrian struck. Police said a 2002 Chrysler PT Cruiser driven by Malinda Johnson, 41, had been traveling northbound on North Charles Street when it struck Alverto. He was pronounced dead at the scene, police said.
NEWS
May 13, 2013
I'm pleased to see The Sun revealing the charges by Maryland hospitals to patients. The differences are astounding. ("Costs vary for same treatment," May 9). Recently, I spent three days and two nights at the Greater Baltimore Medical Center for an allergic reaction I had to an antibiotic given to me for a viral infection. I couldn't believe the amount charged for such a short stay. My bill, $4,745, was astounding. Although Medicare and Blue Cross/Blue Shield paid most of it, I still had to pay for some of the charges.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen, The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2011
Well-wishes were streaming in Saturday for Orioles legend Brooks Robinson , who's recuperating at Greater Baltimore Medical Center after becoming ill this week. The hospital has set up an email address for people to send notes to Robinson, who was scheduled for an outpatient procedure on Thursday, but was instead hospitalized, suffering a fever and infection. Hospital officials say emailed notes to Robinson and his family have been pouring into getwell@gbmc.org . "On Friday night, we printed 100 email messages, put them in a binder and the hospital's chaplain, Joe Hart, delivered the binder of notes to Brooks and his wife," says GBMC spokesman Michael Schwartzberg.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
A man who was operating a mini steamroller that rolled over and trapped him Wednesday afternoon has died, Baltimore County authorities said Thursday. Michael Ray Mathews, 64, of Freeland, was using the mini steamroller to flatten out a pile of dirt when the pile collapsed, causing the steamroller to roll over and trap him underneath, county police said. Another worker at the site, in the 600 block of Belfast Road in Sparks, used another piece of equipment to lift the steamroller so that Mathews could be pulled out. Mathews was taken to St. Joseph's Medical Center, where he later died.
HEALTH
By Kit Waskom Pollard and For The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
When Mary Casterline was diagnosed with invasive carcinoma of the breast in mid-April, she knew she was fortunate. Her cancer was very treatable and she had a lot of options for both treatment and beyond. Casterline's doctors explained that she had the choice between radiation and lumpectomy (removing just the tumor but preserving the breast) or a mastectomy (complete removal of the breast). If she opted for mastectomy, she could choose to reconstruct the breast, either with an implant or via free tissue transfer (also known as "tissue flap" or "trans flap")
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn and The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2014
As an unusual strain of virus continues its march across the country — showing up most recently in Pennsylvania and Virginia — health officials in Maryland are warning doctors to be on the lookout and advising parents to prepare. Enterovirus is common, with millions in the United States sickened every year, most with mild cases. But the relatively rare strain called EV-D68 can cause severe respiratory illness in children with asthma or other health conditions, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
Helyn G. Collison, a founder of a secretarial and typing business who later went into real estate sales, died Friday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of complications from a seizure. She was 85. The daughter of Horace Baylor Hatton, a vice president of Sealtest Dairy, and Hester Yingling Hatton, a homemaker, Helyn Genevieve Hatton was born and raised in Overlea. She was a 1946 graduate of Eastern High School. During the 1940s, she worked as a secretary for Standard Lime & Stone Co. and later for McCormick & Co. She also studied voice at the Peabody Institute.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 8, 2014
D. Kent Parker, a retired supervisor of records and information technology for Baltimore County government, died Saturday at Greater Baltimore Medical Center of complications from a fall. He was 77. The stepson of Halbert Fitz, a salesman, and Margaret Polly Fitz, a homemaker, Donald Kent Parker was born and raised in Westminster. He graduated in 1954 from Westminster High School. Mr. Parker, who never used his first name and preferred his middle name, attended business school in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
David Klein, a well-known Baltimore artist who turned found materials into high-end pieces of furniture that captured the gritty eccentricity of his hometown, died of colon cancer June 6 at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson. He was 71. "He was always in and around Baltimore. Everybody knew him. He was like Gertrude Stein. He had his studio and exhibits, and everybody always visited," said Anita Klein, his wife of 49 years. "He was a one-of-a-kind of Baltimore. " "His pieces, without question, are museum quality," said David Hayden, a close childhood friend and one of the largest collectors, along with his wife, JoAnn, of Mr. Klein's work.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson and The Baltimore Sun | October 2, 2014
A man who was operating a mini steamroller that rolled over and trapped him Wednesday afternoon has died, Baltimore County authorities said Thursday. Michael Ray Mathews, 64, of Freeland, was using the mini steamroller to flatten out a pile of dirt when the pile collapsed, causing the steamroller to roll over and trap him underneath, county police said. Another worker at the site, in the 600 block of Belfast Road in Sparks, used another piece of equipment to lift the steamroller so that Mathews could be pulled out. Mathews was taken to St. Joseph's Medical Center, where he later died.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2012
A Cockeysville woman was charged in her mother's January death after authorities found the 91-year-old woman on a toilet, where she had been left for two days. A Baltimore County grand jury on Aug. 15 indicted Sharon Caslow, 65, for manslaughter for leaving her mother in a bathroom in their home in the 1000 block of Hidden Moss Drive. Medics were called to the home Jan. 17, where they found Audrey Caslow seated on a toilet and determined that she had been there for two days, police said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2014
Arthur E. Dase, a retired Chessie System supervisor and longtime Greater Baltimore Medical Center volunteer, died May 19 of heart failure at his winter home in Seminole, Fla. He was 91. "I always thought that Arthur was devoted to two things: his family and the railroad," said Robert W. "Bob" Breiner, who worked for the Baltimore & Ohio Railroad and later Chessie System. "He was also well-liked by the other railroaders. " The son of John Dase, a toolmaker, and Leona Dase, a homemaker, Arthur Earl Dase was born in Springfield, Ohio.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2014
Music teacher Sarah Brady, 31, was born with a melodious voice, but last year suddenly began having trouble hitting certain notes and suffered frequent bouts of laryngitis. She tried drinking lots of water, sucking on cough drops and resting her voice, all to no avail. An ear, nose and throat specialist sent her to the Johns Hopkins Voice Center, where doctors quickly figured out what was wrong. Doctors at the center, housed at Greater Baltimore Medical Center in Towson, used a flexible scope they eased down her throat to look at her vocal cords, which both had developed calluses.
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