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NEWS
By Marta H. Mossburg | June 7, 2011
Expecting a convention center to lead to job growth is like expecting a diet of double bacon cheeseburgers to lead to weight loss. Pretty much every person who lives in a city with a convention center and every economist knows it — except for people in organizations like the Greater Baltimore Committee (GBC) and Visit Baltimore. They are the ones pushing the nearly $1 billion public-private expansion of the Baltimore Convention Center, arena and Sheraton hotel. Take Baltimore, where 53,000 jobs exited the city over the past decade, along with 30,000 residents.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | May 28, 2011
On the same day the Greater Baltimore Committee unveils transformative plans for a new downtown arena, we receive word of a shooting of a 12-year-old boy who was watching an NBA playoff game on a television set perched in the window of a house on Cliftview Avenue — and this just a day or so after the FBI again affirmed Baltimore as one of the most violent cities in the country. On Thursday, the boy, Sean Johnson, died of his injuries. That's the way it goes around here: Big visions and bold ideas for buildings in the places attractive to tourists, violence and frustrations out in the neighborhoods where Baltimoreans of modest means reside, along with their children.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
While the city reviews proposals to invigorate the Inner Harbor, the Greater Baltimore Committee unveiled a vision of its own, highlighted by a pedestrian bridge that would link the north and south shores, allowing visitors for the first time to walk a complete circle around the downtown waterfront. Leaders of the business group also proposed light and water shows for the harbor, and three different ideas for turning Rash Field on the south shore into a world-class park. The bridge would be built high enough above the water that most sailboats and water taxis could travel underneath.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | May 25, 2011
Construction magnate Willard Hackerman has offered to finance and build an 18,500-seat arena in downtown Baltimore, civic leaders say, freeing taxpayers from having to foot the bill and significantly increasing the chances that plans for a $900 million convention center expansion and arena will become a reality. News of Hackerman's offer was made public Wednesday at the annual meeting of the Greater Baltimore Committee, a private business group that has been exploring ways to build an arena that would be combined with an expanded convention center to bolster the city's tourism business and add life to Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
With a price tag approaching $1 billion, a plan to expand Baltimore's Convention Center and build an arena next to it would be one of the most expensive construction projects ever undertaken in Baltimore. A preliminary estimate places the cost to expand the Convention Center and build an adjacent arena at $750 million to $930 million, with funding expected to come from the public and private sectors, according to the head of the Greater Baltimore Committee, a nonprofit civic group studying the proposal.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
James L. Sinclair, a retired Baltimore businessman who was president for nearly four decades of the charitable Sheridan Foundation, which aids schools and cultural organizations, died Sunday of a heart attack at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Reisterstown resident was 81. Mr. Sinclair, the son of a Bethlehem Steel Corp. engineer and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown and Dundalk. After graduating from Towson High School in 1946, he enlisted in the Navy, where he attained the rank of petty officer before being discharged in 1949.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | March 12, 2010
Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake turned Thursday to civic leaders and athletic apparel maker Under Armour Inc. for help in luring a high-profile Google pilot project to Baltimore. She also appointed a "Google Czar" to spearhead the effort. Baltimore is one of many municipalities vying for Google's attention. The Mountain View, Calif., company recently launched a project called Google Fiber for Communities and plans to develop ultra-high-speed broadband networks in one or more locations across the nation.
BUSINESS
By Gus G. Sentementes | gus.sentementes@baltsun.com | March 11, 2010
Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake on Thursday turned to civic leaders and a top local company for help in luring a high-profile Google pilot project to the city and appointed a volunteer "Google czar" to spearhead the effort. Rawlings-Blake said the Greater Baltimore Committee, a group of more than 500 businesses and nonprofits, and the Economic Alliance of Baltimore, the region's main marketing organization, will assist a grass-roots campaign to catch the attention of the online search giant.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Julie Bykowicz | January 10, 2010
Baltimore's new mayor needs to show local business leaders that she appreciates their investment in the city and will work hard to address their concerns, said Donald C. Fry, executive director of the Greater Baltimore Committee, a regional business leadership organization. "She has to reach out to the business community to let them know she understands the important role business has for the future of the city," Fry said. "She has to show people who have made significant capital investments in the city that she understands them."
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