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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Robert Keller, The Evening Sun's first metropolitan editor and later executive director of the Greater Baltimore Committee, died May 12 of complications from Crohn's disease at Harbor Hospital. He was 71. The son of a banker and a bookkeeper, Robert Keller was born in Trenton, N.J., and raised in Baltimore's Howard Park neighborhood. He earned his high school diploma and bachelor's degree in 1963 from St. Mary's Seminary & University in Roland Park. Mr. Keller was a reporter for The Catholic Review from 1963 until 1965, when he joined the staff of the Delmarva Dialog in Wilmington, Del. In 1967, he joined The Evening Sun as a reporter and in 1972 became city editor.
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NEWS
May 13, 2013
Harbor East is moving farther east with baker-cum-developer John Paterakis Sr.'s announcement Friday that he will break ground this summer on a new, mega-Whole Foods and later on a new residential/retail building across Central Avenue from the glittering mini-city he has almost single handedly built during the last 15 years. Things are bustling in that corner of the city, what with the planned construction of a new headquarters office tower for Exelon Corp. and a variety of other smaller scale residential, retail, office and hotel developments nearby.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2013
City leaders hope that by this time next year they'll have returned from Annapolis with funds to put toward making the Inner Harbor what its original designers intended it to be - "a playground for Baltimoreans. " "The city has changed so much since the original development of the Inner Harbor," said Laurie Schwartz, executive director of the Waterfront Partnership of Baltimore Inc., a nonprofit that manages and advocates for the city's waterfront. It's time to evaluate the Inner Harbor and decide what needs to be done to sustain it as a vibrant part of the city, she said.
BUSINESS
By Candy Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
Bad roads and congestion cost Baltimore-area drivers nearly $1,800 a year in lost time, vehicle repairs and wasted gas, according to a study released Thursday by TRIP, a national transportation industry group. The report says two-thirds of the region's major roads are in poor or mediocre condition while the remaining third are in fair or good condition. A quarter of the major bridges in the state show significant deterioration or do not meet modern design standards. TRIP obtained the information from the Maryland Department of Transportation.
NEWS
Lionel Foster | January 17, 2013
Jan Houbolt may be the most influential Baltimorean you've never heard of. As head of the Greater Baltimore Committee's Leadership Program since 1989, he has helped groom some of the state's up-and-coming leaders through a 10-month-long series of site visits and conversations that help them examine the city in all its complexity. Mr. Houbolt will retire in December, so this year's class, his 25th, will be his last. I talked to him about why a white sociology major from a historically black university took a job with Baltimore's business elite - and some of what he saw along the way. Q: Where did you grow up?
NEWS
December 7, 2012
Rep. Steny Hoyer deserves praise for his comments earlier this week acknowledging that Democrats need to be willing to put Social Security and Medicare on the table as part of a comprehensive solution for our nation's debt problem. To achieve the type of reasonable and responsible solution that our country needs, both Democrats and Republicans need to be willing to make compromises on areas that their core constituencies have long considered to be untouchable. Congressman Hoyer has stepped forward and shown the type of practical political leadership that our country so desperately needs.
NEWS
November 18, 2012
In 1987, The Sun's editorial board decided to bestow upon the Johns Hopkins University's then-president, Steven Muller, a newly created award: Marylander of the Year. The distinction was meant to honor the person who "contributed the most to Baltimore and Maryland and to the lives of our people," and the man who was in the midst of a rapid expansion of Hopkins' medical and academic empire got the nod as the leading "puller of strings, guide, coach, motivator, spokesman, cheerleader, tambourine-shaker, master of ceremonies and world traveler.
NEWS
September 23, 2012
Baltimore's Fraternal Order of Police is celebrating what is, at most, a Pyrrhic victory in its effort to reverse the pension reforms Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake and the City Council enacted two years ago. Federal Judge Marvin J. Garbis' ruling that a key provision of the reform plan was unconstitutional appears to mean that the entire law has been struck down. But his ruling also made clear that the vast majority of the provisions in the law are permissible and that even in the part he objected to, a slight change in the plan's design could meet the city's fiscal objectives without violating the Constitution.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 18, 2012
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake on Tuesday touted a summer of safe high-profile events in the downtown area — part of a strategy, aides said, to rebut those who have characterized the Inner Harbor as unsafe. The mayor's remarks were intended to highlight the city's safety record as the summer draws to a close, but elicited some criticism following weeks of violence in city neighborhoods, including the fatal shooting of a scientist Monday. "The people on the ground, the working people of Baltimore, completely disagree with [the mayor's]
FEATURES
By Steve Kilar and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
There were few laugh lines in U.S. Treasury Secretary Timothy Geithner's Thursday morning address to Baltimore's business community. But one of the biggest resulted from a bizarre off-script non sequitur Geithner made early in his speech. Setting: Fourth-floor conference room at the Marriott Waterfront Hotel in Harbor East. Three hundred of Baltimore's most influential business and political leaders are seated at round, white-clothed tables.
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