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Greater Baltimore Committee

NEWS
January 31, 2014
Consider not only the good news, but the overarching theme that was conveyed in the recent editorial, "Building a more entrepreneurial Maryland" (Jan. 27): Those of us who are determined to make Maryland a top-notch home for starts-ups and businesses of all kinds are working together toward this goal like never before. We are determined. Clearly, our legislators and Gov. Martin O'Malley are making a concerted effort to bolster diverse job growth, while advocacy groups like the Greater Baltimore Committee and TEDCO have created forums to move the discussion forward.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | January 27, 2014
Democratic legislative leaders gave partial support Monday to a push to raise the minimum wage, with some reiterating unwillingness to impose a "one size fits all" increase across the state. They provided few other clues as to how they will respond to Gov. Martin O'Malley's call to lift the state's minimum pay from $7.25 an hour to $10.10 by 2016, with future increases tied to inflation. "That's a debate we will have in committee," House Speaker Michael E. Busch said Monday at a breakfast for business leaders hosted by the Greater Baltimore Committee.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2013
With momentum building for higher hourly pay in Maryland, Rep. John Delaney, a co-sponsor of a federal minimum wage bill and a former CEO, urged Baltimore-area business leaders Thursday to have a voice in a measure he said is long overdue. The business community's involvement in crafting a law will be key in limiting damage to businesses while lifting the standard of living for low-wage workers, the Maryland Democrat said during a round table discussion led by the Greater Baltimore Committee.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | December 3, 2013
The Baltimore Development Corp. will pay a Texas-based consultant up to $167,500 to develop a strategy for the city to improve its economic and business climate, the mayor's office announced Tuesday. Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake said the effort is intended to bolster job creation, revitalize neighborhoods and attract new investment. The consultant, AngelouEconomics, will include input from local businesses, community leaders and city residents in its plan. A series of public forums is scheduled over the next week, beginning with a session on Tuesday.
NEWS
November 20, 2013
I am offended by your Nov. 17 editorial on the new Inner Harbor plan ( "Inner Harbor reborn" . Your implication that the Baltimore Beach Volleyball League at Rash Field is just another in a "hodgepodge of attractions" is insulting. For 10 years, this league has anchored the southern part of the Inner Harbor, providing a healthy, fun sport for thousands of city and non-city residents. Every night of the week people come together to play, then go out and spend money at local establishments.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Leaders of Maryland's transportation industry said Monday that the state's future depends on continued infrastructure investment, beyond the $4.4 billion already scheduled for highway and mass transit systems in the next six years. Such investment will be the deciding factor between "a future of mobility and one of stagnation" in an already congested but still-growing region, Donald Fry, president and CEO of the Greater Baltimore Committee, said at the group's annual transportation summit.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
City leaders will unveil an ambitious long-term plan for the Inner Harbor Wednesday designed to restore pizazz to a vital area that's beginning to show its age. The "Inner Harbor 2.0" plan calls for constructing a pedestrian bridge to connect Harbor East with Federal Hill, turning Rash Field into a grassy park and squaring Light Street to link McKeldin Plaza to the harbor amphitheater. Other elements include a kayak launch, bike share program and urban beach, featuring a floating swimming pool.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 9, 2013
For their joint news conference on Thursday, the police commissioner and state's attorney of Baltimore chose Mund Park on Greenmount Avenue, where, they said, members of the Black Guerrilla Family and their associates held regular meetings. That moment was fraught with symbolism — top cop Anthony Batts, in uniform, and top prosecutor Gregg Bernstein, in a gray suit, reclaiming a public park from a violent gang. But the symbolism grows larger when you consider the place — Greenmount Avenue, between North Avenue and 25th Street — in the context of the long struggles of Baltimore: the riots of 1968, the white flight, the concentration of poverty, the rise in crime, the generally sad reputation of the area, and the long wait for transformative help.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | October 16, 2013
Baltimore has not had an NBA team to call its own since 1973, and despite occasional murmurings of interest from city leaders, there is no sign that will change anytime soon. The city will host the Washington Wizards for the first time since 1999 for a Thursday night exhibition against the New York Knicks and Baltimore native Carmelo Anthony. Tickets for that event have sold well, with a full house possible at Baltimore Arena. But major obstacles stand in the way of Baltimore even flirting with the NBA. The league has shown little recent interest in expanding.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
Three industry groups from Baltimore and Washington said Thursday that they've banded together to "solidify" the region as the top place for cyber-related business growth. The new Baltimore-Washington Cyber Task Force - formed by the Greater Baltimore Committee, the Greater Washington Board of Trade and the Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore - will work with other groups on the effort. They want to capitalize on the U.S. Cyber Command at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County, which oversees the operation and defense of the military's information networks.
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