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Greater Baltimore Committee

NEWS
December 7, 2012
Rep. Steny Hoyer deserves praise for his comments earlier this week acknowledging that Democrats need to be willing to put Social Security and Medicare on the table as part of a comprehensive solution for our nation's debt problem. To achieve the type of reasonable and responsible solution that our country needs, both Democrats and Republicans need to be willing to make compromises on areas that their core constituencies have long considered to be untouchable. Congressman Hoyer has stepped forward and shown the type of practical political leadership that our country so desperately needs.
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BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
A German contract research company said yesterday that it will open a laboratory and manufacturing facility in Baltimore County to provide services to biomedical companies.The announcement, made by the state's secretary of economic and employment development, Mark L. Wasserman, at a meeting of the Greater Baltimore Committee last night, was a boost for the state's efforts to attract new life-sciences businesses to the region.LAB Pharmaceutical Services Inc., the Maryland subsidiary of LAB GmbH & Co. of Germany, contracts with biotechnology and drug companies, particularly small companies, that need technical advice getting new drugs through the federal regulatory process and to market.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff | December 6, 1995
Husky Labs, regarded as one of Maryland's most promising start-up information technology companies, has moved to cyberspace.Vice President Monica Larson said yesterday that Husky, which designs World Wide Web pages for clients who want to be on the Internet, will now operate with most employees working out of their homes and connected by a computer network.She said the physical headquarters of the company will be outside Shepherdstown, W.Va., at the home to which she and her husband, company founder David Larson Levine, have recently moved.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sloane Brown | March 19, 2000
Parren J. Mitchell enthusiastically greeted the crowd at the Public Justice Center's 15th anniversary celebration as he was honored with the organization's Thurgood Marshall Award. Adding to the honor, NAACP president Kweisi Mfume presented Maryland's first African-American congressman with a portrait of the first Congressional Black Caucus, of which Mitchell was a founding member. Others in the Hyatt Regency ballroom: Nancy Paige, Public Justice Center president; Michael Higginbotham, PJC vice president; George Beall, Mindy Mintz, Jan Wilson and J. P. Sarbanes, PJC board members; Monica Henderson, event chair; Jan Houbolt, event committee member; Jonathan Smith, PJC executive director; Julian Bond, NAACP board chair and the evening's featured speaker; Baltimore Circuit Court Judge Kathleen O'Ferrall Friedman; Herb Garten, Maryland Legal Services Corp.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2010
James L. Sinclair, a retired Baltimore businessman who was president for nearly four decades of the charitable Sheridan Foundation, which aids schools and cultural organizations, died Sunday of a heart attack at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Reisterstown resident was 81. Mr. Sinclair, the son of a Bethlehem Steel Corp. engineer and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown and Dundalk. After graduating from Towson High School in 1946, he enlisted in the Navy, where he attained the rank of petty officer before being discharged in 1949.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | November 12, 2013
City leaders will unveil an ambitious long-term plan for the Inner Harbor Wednesday designed to restore pizazz to a vital area that's beginning to show its age. The "Inner Harbor 2.0" plan calls for constructing a pedestrian bridge to connect Harbor East with Federal Hill, turning Rash Field into a grassy park and squaring Light Street to link McKeldin Plaza to the harbor amphitheater. Other elements include a kayak launch, bike share program and urban beach, featuring a floating swimming pool.
NEWS
February 21, 1995
On the lovely pre-Spring Sunday just past, two days after the death at 79 of Baltimore businessman-philanthropist Robert H. Levi, the outdoor sculpture garden he and his wife, Ryda, gave to the Baltimore Museum of Art was crowded with city folk celebrating Black History Month. Children darted in and about the massive outdoor pieces done by some of the most significant sculptors of this century. Adults enjoyed the stimulating yet serene combination of art and nature the garden offers. Bob Levi would have been pleased.
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 16, 2000
One year ago, John Morton III announced at the Greater Baltimore Committee's annual meeting his goal of halving crime by 2002. Last night, the chairman of the GBC took to the podium again, saying it hasn't happened yet. Morton reminded those attending the GBC's annual meeting of Baltimore's grim rankings: first nationwide in robberies, second in homicides, third in assaults and fourth in burglaries. That "daily bloodshed," he said, was detracting from Baltimore's advantages as a place to do business.
NEWS
January 14, 2003
MORE THAN credibility is at stake in the Baltimore City school system's struggle to manage its finances. At stake is the system's ability to keep delivering on the promise of its hard-won and much-heralded academic progress of recent years. Let the auditors from the Greater Baltimore Committee, the architects of the city-state partnership overseeing city schools, and the politicians in Annapolis remember: A child waits in the classroom at the receiving end of the services provided by each precious dollar.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | October 1, 2004
Economists with Baltimore's largest investment houses are optimistic about the economy next year no matter who's elected president, saying that corporations and consumers have balance sheets that allow them to spend. Speaking yesterday to about 300 executives at the Greater Baltimore Committee's annual business outlook conference downtown, Alan Levenson, chief economist for T. Rowe Price Group Inc., said he expects U.S. economic activity will continue to grow at the same pace as it has this year.
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