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Greater Baltimore Committee

BUSINESS
September 25, 1991
The Greater Baltimore Committee yesterday presented civic achievement awards to 15 Baltimore-area businesses for improving the quality of life in Baltimore.For the past 17 years, the mayor of Baltimore has joined GBC in honoring the recipients of the awards, which are called the Mayor's Business Recognition Awards.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke congratulated the winners at a luncheon in their honor yesterday at the Hyatt Regency Baltimore. The recipients are:Acme Paper & Supply Inc.Baines Stop, Shop & SaveBaltimore Gas & ElectricThe Baltimore SunChase Bank of MarylandCOUNT ProgramFirst National Bank of MarylandIBM Corp.
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BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | May 30, 2013
Three industry groups from Baltimore and Washington said Thursday that they've banded together to "solidify" the region as the top place for cyber-related business growth. The new Baltimore-Washington Cyber Task Force - formed by the Greater Baltimore Committee, the Greater Washington Board of Trade and the Economic Alliance of Greater Baltimore - will work with other groups on the effort. They want to capitalize on the U.S. Cyber Command at Fort Meade in Anne Arundel County, which oversees the operation and defense of the military's information networks.
NEWS
March 20, 1992
Joyce S. Youse, membership director for the Greater Baltimore Committee, died Sunday at her home on St. Dunstan's Road after an apparent heart attack. She was 49.Services for Mrs. Youse will be held at 11 a.m. tomorrow at the Lutheran Church of the Holy Comforter, 5513 York Road, where her husband, the Rev. Carol Henry Youse, has been pastor since 1977.She had worked for the GBC since 1985.At the Church of the Holy Comforter, she taught Sunday school classes, worked in youth programs and was a member of women's groups and the sister parish committee.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Staff Writer | October 16, 1992
Thomas J. Chmura, who helped shape a vision for Baltimore's economic future, is moving to an economic development job at the University of Massachusetts.The Greater Baltimore Committee's deputy director said he was lured away by Michael Hooker, the former president of the University of Maryland Baltimore County, during an August vacation in Maine. Mr. Hooker became the president of University of Massachusetts this year.The two men were instrumental in convincing the region's business community that life sciences and high-tech companies could become the future economic base for Baltimore and the state.
NEWS
March 8, 1997
AFTER THREE YEARS of existing under the aegis of the Greater Baltimore Committee, the Greater Baltimore Alliance is going independent. And it has hired its first president, Ioanna Morfessis.In the seven years Ms. Morfessis led the Greater Phoenix Economic Council in Arizona, the group assisted 139 firms in establishing operations in the area. The effort created 64,500 jobs and helped the area restart an economic boom that had gone bust. Prior to that, she was Montgomery County's economic development director.
NEWS
May 5, 1991
These Marylanders were interviewed by members of the Peirce team for the Baltimore and Beyond special section. Their comments were used anonymously so that they would feel free to be candid.HAROLD ADAMS, president, RTKL Associates Inc.DR. EDWARD ANDREWS, assistant superintendent of public instruction, BaltimoreDR. TIM ARMBRUSTER, president, Baltimore Community Foundation & Goldseker FoundationGERALDINE BACHMAN, Baltimore Regional Council of GovernmentsWILL BAKER, director, Chesapeake Bay FoundationCORNELIUS J. BEHAN, police chief, Baltimore County Police DepartmentDANIEL BERGER, The Baltimore SunRICK BERNDT, attorney, Gallagher, Evelius & JonesBERNARD BERKOWITZ, University of Maryland Baltimore CountyCLARENCE W. BLOUNT, D-Baltimore, majority leader, Maryland SenateELIZABETH BOBO, former Howard County executiveLASLO BOYD, associate vice president and assistant to the president, University of Maryland Baltimore CountyDR.
NEWS
July 23, 1994
Although it may sound like a desperate -- to a legalistic loophole, a group of major Baltimore businesses wants to improve the region's air quality rating by combining the greater Baltimore and greater Washington areas.Under the broader identity of the combined Washington-Baltimore metropolitan area, officially recognized by the Census Bureau in 1993, the area would have only a "serious" ozone pollution problem, instead of the "severe" ozone problem ascribed to the Baltimore area alone.This downgrading would allow some 2,000 larger Baltimore employers to avoid the difficult and costly task of reducing the number of auto commuter trips made by their employees, a requirement of the federal government under the Clean Air Act for the nation's worst ozone areas.
NEWS
April 29, 1992
The topic recently was the possible revival of a chamber of commerce in Baltimore City. Addressing some 30 people interested in the idea, William M. Hesson Jr., of the Greater Baltimore Board of Realtors, said: "If it is a bad idea, let's stop it. If it is a good idea, let's do it."In the end, a steering committee was set up. It has no fixed membership nor a timetable. The future will show whether a new chamber of commerce is in the cards.Re-establishing a chamber of commerce is not an easy task in these economic times even though a number of Baltimore businessmen seems to have had it with the Greater Baltimore Committee.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2003
Putting aside their usual abhorrence of higher taxes, Baltimore and Washington business groups endorsed an increase in the state's 23 1/2 -cent-per-gallon gasoline tax last night while opposing any effort to limit the use of that revenue to building and maintaining roads. The positions taken by the Greater Baltimore Committee and Greater Washington Board of Trade put them somewhat at odds with the Maryland Chamber of Commerce, which supported a 5-cent increase in the gas tax but asked that it be dedicated to highway projects.
NEWS
May 18, 1997
WHAT IS THE COST of doing nothing?That should be the first question asked tomorrow when the Greater Baltimore Committee and Baltimore Metropolitan Council convene a "regional forum" to discuss ways in which the parts that make up this area can strengthen the whole.Some mistakenly believe the status quo is fine. The suburbs can grow. The city can wither; maybe even plow it under, a commissioner from Carroll County scoffed. His remark was callous, but he wasn't the first to suggest it.This was a Sun editorialist's take on Baltimore in 1969: "Tenants who can afford to do so move farther out. Vandals move in and leave vacant properties in shambles.
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