Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGreater Baltimore Committee
IN THE NEWS

Greater Baltimore Committee

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
May 20, 1996
THE GREATER BALTIMORE Committee, at 41, is a boomer that has achieved great things but is going through a mid-life crisis. First Maryland Bankcorp. chief Frank P. Bramble, who took over the chairmanship of the 600-member business group last week, promises renewal of the business group by establishing benchmark goals. He wants a "new Broadway-style theater by the year 2000." He wants an end to "Baltimore bashing." He wants to practice regionalism."Some regions in this country recognize the value of business.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Industry growth and a tide of employee retirements in Baltimore's transportation sector will create or leave open thousands of jobs by 2020, but local job seekers aren't prepared to fill them, according to a study released Monday by the Opportunity Collaborative. Low-income residents lack the needed technical training or have criminal records that make them ineligible for the jobs, according to the study by the coalition of state agencies, local governments, universities and nonprofits tasked with plotting a course toward sustainable economic growth for the Baltimore region.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1995
William Boucher III, a businessman who influenced the city's downtown redevelopment as executive director of the Greater Baltimore Committee under 12 chairmen, six Baltimore mayors and as many governors, died Monday of a heart attack at Harbor Hospital Center.Mr. Boucher, who was 76, had been stricken at the state Motor Vehicle Administration in Glen Burnie.The Butler resident retired in 1981 from the GBC.During a 26-year career with the GBC, he left his mark on the Charles Center, Inner Harbor Civic Center and Jones Falls Expressway projects, development of mass transit and the Maryland Port Authority and passage of the city's open housing law."
NEWS
September 18, 2014
Baltimore City certainly did show off its best with this week's Star-Spangled Spectacular to residents and tourists ( "A spectacular weekend for Baltimore," Sept. 15). We were thrilled to see so many people lining the Inner Harbor promenade to enjoy tours of the visiting ships, watch the fireworks and dine at our local restaurants. And now the city prepares for Baltimore Book Festival, which moves to the Inner Harbor for the first time ever. Looks like the Orioles aren't the only ones on a winning streak, despite some recent setbacks.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | November 18, 2013
Leaders of Maryland's transportation industry said Monday that the state's future depends on continued infrastructure investment, beyond the $4.4 billion already scheduled for highway and mass transit systems in the next six years. Such investment will be the deciding factor between "a future of mobility and one of stagnation" in an already congested but still-growing region, Donald Fry, president and CEO of the Greater Baltimore Committee, said at the group's annual transportation summit.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 18, 2013
Robert Keller, The Evening Sun's first metropolitan editor and later executive director of the Greater Baltimore Committee, died May 12 of complications from Crohn's disease at Harbor Hospital. He was 71. The son of a banker and a bookkeeper, Robert Keller was born in Trenton, N.J., and raised in Baltimore's Howard Park neighborhood. He earned his high school diploma and bachelor's degree in 1963 from St. Mary's Seminary & University in Roland Park. Mr. Keller was a reporter for The Catholic Review from 1963 until 1965, when he joined the staff of the Delmarva Dialog in Wilmington, Del. In 1967, he joined The Evening Sun as a reporter and in 1972 became city editor.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | December 12, 2011
Employment in the Baltimore area has held up better in the last few difficult years than it has in other, similar regions, thanks largely to the strength of the education, health care and government sectors, according to a new study. The 2011 State of the Region report, produced for the Greater Baltimore Committee, says the Baltimore area's loss of 1.6 percent of its jobs between 2008 and 2010 was the fifth-smallest drop among 20 metro areas studied. Austin, Texas, had the best performance, with a drop of about half a percent, while Tampa's 3.6 percent job loss ranked the Florida city dead last.
BUSINESS
By Paul Adams and Paul Adams,SUN STAFF | January 5, 2005
The Baltimore they knew was a city in despair. Its retailers and residents were fleeing to the suburbs, property values were in free fall, and signs of urban decay were everywhere. There was no Charles Center, no Jones Falls Expressway, no Harborplace, no convention center, no Metro subway, no Ravens and no National Aquarium. Marshalling their economic star power, a who's who of Baltimore business leaders formed the Greater Baltimore Committee 50 years ago today and threw their weight behind all of those revitalization projects and more.
BUSINESS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1996
For anyone who still doubts information has become one of the hottest commodities in America, consider this: Maryland's four fastest growing technology companies make their money by transmitting, analyzing or organizing information.Their revenue growth is "pretty good" in the understated words of one company executive. Yes, the company he works for has at least doubled its staff and its revenues every year since 1991. This year, Rapid Systems Solutions, which has 275 employees, is expected to have revenues of $30 million.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | October 15, 2002
Donald C. Fry, executive vice president and general counsel of the Greater Baltimore Committee, will become the group's president next month, officials said yesterday. Fry, 47, who has worked at the GBC for 3 1/2 years, will replace Donald P. Hutchinson when Hutchinson steps down Nov. 1 to become president and chief executive of SunTrust Bank's Maryland division. "He knows the organization inside and out," GBC Chairman Francis B. Burch Jr. said of Fry. "Over the past three years, he's become increasingly known to the business community.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 11, 2014
It's a small property tied to the fate of a much bigger one. The Inner Harbor merry-go-round, which has struggled for years, sits next to Rash Field, a roughly 7-acre expanse of volleyball pits and muddy field ringed by gray concrete, that city and civic leaders have long dreamed of turning into a bigger, better attraction. The basic plan for the field - to build an underground parking garage and place a park on top - was proposed by a team hired by the city in 1994. It has reappeared in similar guises at least four times since, racking up hundreds of thousands dollars in planning fees, before retreating each time for lack of funding and support.
NEWS
June 23, 2014
When Gregg Bernstein was elected state's attorney in 2010, the office badly needed reform. Four years later, David Kennedy from the John Jay College of Criminal Justice in New York described Baltimore's as "the best run state's attorney office in the country. " Baltimore cannot afford to step backward from this remarkable progress. After his election, following proposals developed with the Greater Baltimore Committee and seizing on nationwide "best practices," Mr. Bernstein reorganized the office as a model for "vertical community prosecution.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Controversial legislation intended to help ex-convicts find jobs is headed to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake for her expected signature after the City Council gave the measure final approval Monday. The "Ban the Box" bill will force Baltimore employers to wait to ask about a job candidate's criminal history until a conditional offer has been extended. The bill passed despite an intense lobbying effort from business leaders, who said they should have the right to vet prospective employees early in the process.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews Sr | April 9, 2014
"Oh, Baltimore, ain't it hard just to live?" Nina Simone lamented in song about life in the city back in 1978, and not much has changed since then for the tens of thousands of residents who are living in poverty, are homeless or who are suffering unemployment due to a background check that prevented them from getting work. Legislation currently before the Baltimore City Council - Council Bill 13-301, to ban the checkbox that asks about a job seeker's criminal history on the employment applications of companies doing business in the city - has been held up by critics and is in danger of dying.
NEWS
March 23, 2014
A proposal in the Baltimore City Council to prohibit employers from asking about the criminal history of prospective employees until late in the hiring process has produced a strong backlash from the business community, and in particular the Greater Baltimore Committee. The GBC had been quietly lobbying against the measure for some time, but it has become much more vocal since the measure passed a preliminary vote unanimously, and now a final vote that had been scheduled for Monday appears likely to be postponed.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
The Greater Baltimore Committee's board of directors strongly opposes the "Ban the Box" legislation in its current form for a number of reasons, even though its members recognize and appreciate the well-meaning intention of this legislation and its sponsor, Councilman Nick Mosby, for ex-offenders to not be arbitrarily excluded from consideration before having a chance to demonstrate their skills and positive attributes ( "Banning the box," ...
NEWS
By Thomas W. Waldron and Thomas W. Waldron,SUN STAFF | February 21, 1997
Baltimore's leading business group is touting the economic benefits of bringing casino gambling to Maryland, but has stopped short of endorsing such a move.The Greater Baltimore Committee released a study yesterday suggesting that 10 casinos in Maryland -- including five in the Baltimore area -- would generate $435 million in tax revenues and create more than 12,000 new jobs statewide."There is strong evidence it would have a major economic impact," said GBC Chairman Frank P. Bramble, chief executive of First Maryland Bancorp.
BUSINESS
By Gary Gately and Gary Gately,SUN STAFF | July 24, 1997
As the Board of Estimates approved the Wyndham Inner Harbor East Hotel yesterday, an influential business group told the mayor that he has his priorities backward and should instead first develop a hotel next to the expanded Baltimore Convention Center.The Greater Baltimore Committee, in a letter to the mayor signed by GBC Chairman Frank Bramble, argued that the lack of a closer hotel endangers the $151 million public investment in the expanded center and seriously jeopardizes the city's relationship with the state legislature.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | March 2, 2014
Calvin G. Butler Jr. came to Baltimore nearly three years ago with one foot here and the other in Chicago, flying west on weekends to his wife and two teenagers. Now he's firmly in this region. His family moved to Cockeysville last summer. He's on two local nonprofit boards. And on Saturday, he took the helm at one of the city's largest employers, Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. He's glad his stretch as a nomadic exec is over. And he's not the only one. "What I recognize is that I have a very patient wife," he said.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | February 10, 2014
Philanthropist Willard Hackerman, who transformed a small construction firm into a national giant with $5 billion in annual billings and was instrumental in erecting Maryland landmarks such as Harborplace, died Monday of unknown causes at Johns Hopkins Hospital. He was 95. His firm, Whiting-Turner Contracting Co., completed the new University of Baltimore School of Law last year and built the Joseph Meyerhoff Symphony Hall, the National Aquarium and M&T Bank Stadium, among countless other projects around the city and state.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.