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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 22, 1991
Great WhiteWhen: Monday, March 25, 8 p.m.Where: Towson Center, Towson State UniversityTickets: $18.50Call: 481-6000Last year, when Great White appeared on MTV's acoustic music show, "MTV Unplugged," the band made a big hit with its rendition of Led Zeppelin's "Babe I'm Gonna Leave You." In fact, it was such a smash that MTV excerpted the performance and ran it in regular rotation.All of which came as a surprise to the band, particularly since, as singer Jack Russell admits, "We'd never played the song before."
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TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2014
Was it Big Kahuna? That's just a guess after seeing a video of a shark circling a boat off the coast of Ocean City that was posted online by University of Maryland student Aaron Caplan. Caplan, 19, said he was shark fishing with friends on July 30 about 5-6 miles off shore when a great white shark became curious about his boat. He estimated the shark was about 13-15 feet - a wee bit smaller than his 24-foot fishing boat. "It got close enough that we identified it as a great white," he said in a phone interview Thursday, adding that he never expected to attract anything that big. "We actually got to pet it one of the times when it rubbed against the boat.
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FEATURES
By Nestor Aparicio and Nestor Aparicio,Evening Sun Staff | May 9, 1991
Bouncing around the rock 'n' roll industry as a perennial opening act, the members of the San Francisco band Great White know that the good life can be all-too-fleeting.Two months ago the band was in the midst of a headlining tour with Steelheart and Bulletboys with aspirations to take the tour through the summer.But while their fifth album, "Hooked," shot into the Top 20 album chart and its first single "Call It Rock N' Roll" was receiving heavy airplay, tickets for the shows were hardly doing boffo business.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
The movie "Jaws" was released 39 years ago this month so by now we're certain it's more than safe to go back in the water. Or is it? Over the weekend, a fisherman off the coast of Cape May, N.J., had a semi-pleasant (no one died) encounter with a great white shark that came snooping near the man's 35-foot boat. The 16-foot shark hung around about 20 minutes, according to Steve Clark, the vessel's owner, and didn't leave without getting a taste of a bait bag filled with chum that was hanging from the boat.
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 23, 2003
WEST WARWICK, R.I. - Christopher Travis felt certain he would die. The fire had plunged the club into darkness, and the ghoulish shrieking had begun. Travis is a big man, a 6-foot-tall construction worker. But from somewhere, a blow smacked him face-down onto the floor. People were trampling on his hands now. They were falling on top of him. He started to cough. Every breath burned. He thought he knew the floor plan of The Station from the many concerts he had seen there. But he was in a sea of blackness now. A despair as thick as the smoke settled over him. Where am I?
NEWS
By Ariel Sabar and Ariel Sabar,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | February 22, 2003
WEST WARWICK, R.I. - An indoor fireworks display meant to kick off a heavy metal concert late Thursday turned a roadside nightclub into a gruesome firetrap, killing at least 96 people and injuring nearly 200 in the deadliest nightclub fire in a quarter-century. The band, Great White, was just seconds into its first song when a set of spark-making canisters on stage ignited soundproofing insulation on the club's walls and ceiling. Flames raced toward the back of the room, and as thick black smoke poured through the audience, cheering gave way to pandemonium as hundreds stampeded for the front door, trampling and crushing those who had fallen beneath them.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 23, 2003
PROVIDENCE, R.I. - Invoking a statute enacted after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the first federal lawsuit has been filed seeking damages from February's nightclub fire here that killed 99 people. The civil suit on behalf of three victims of Rhode Island's worst fire disaster identifies at least two dozen defendants - including the state and the Rhode Island fire marshal. Attorney Ronald J. Resmini contends in the suit that the state failed to properly train local fire officials.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | July 27, 2003
The Secret Life of Sharks, by A. Peter Klimley. Simon and Schuster, 320 pages, $25. What a disappointment. Humans aren't as yummy to sharks as we thought. As a matter of fact, in the eyes of a great white, we're the lima beans of snack foods. Marine biologist A. Peter Klimley should know. He has spent more than three decades studying sharks, their behavior and habitat. His first book, Great White Sharks: The Biology of Carcharodon carcharias, was a scientific volume. This book, The Secret Life of Sharks, is meant for those of us propped up this summer in a beach chair, cool drink by our sides.
SPORTS
By New York Times News Service | July 20, 1993
SANDWICH, England -- Of all the things Greg Norman buried in the ancient linksland at Royal St. George's on Sunday, the most important was his dangerously escalating image as golf's biggest cartoon character.Until he beat Nick Faldo and Bernhard Langer at the 122nd British Open, Norman was The Great White Shark -- hitting the ball a mile, spinning it back off greens, shooting at island greens with 1-irons. Sometimes he won, more times he lost. Either way, it was bigger than life.But Norman is human, not a cartoon fish, and if there is a single key to his stirring victory, it is that at age 38, he has come to understand that it is the little things that make champions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff Writer | November 12, 1993
The best moment in "Search for the Great Sharks," the new feature at the Maryland Science Center's IMAX theater, is oddly quiet.We are aboard a research vessel floating on a calm sea, as the sky presses down and ocean birds sail overhead. It's a scene of pure, heightened anticipation that stretches out for a long, long moment until . . .Wham! The jaws of a great white shark break the surface and attack a bait fish floating from a surface buoy.That transition from serenity to sudden violence symbolizes why sharks so terrify us, of course -- and why they fascinate us, too."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
Watching actress Megan Anderson on stage is like watching a kite loop about the sky in a brisk wind. When that scrap of brightly colored paper zooms through the air and twists in unexpected directions, the scene is as joyful as it is unpredictable. Like the kite, Anderson only appears to be untethered. In reality, she's anchored firmly to the ground. Anderson's particular patch of turf is Baltimore. The city is where she was born, went to school, married actor Kyle Prue and is raising their 6-year-old daughter, Zoe. It's in Baltimore where Anderson mourned the death of her beloved father, and where she eats dinner every Sunday with her extended family.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | October 14, 2007
Lab glasses securely in place, Amber Warfield inserted the scientific instrument into a small test tube and carefully extracted the dark liquid inside. She then bent over a small square of bright blue gel and transferred the newly acquired sample into one of the tiny rectangular holes puncturing the gel. She handed the instrument, a micropipette used to measure very small volumes, to lab partner Joshua Ayres. He repeated her movements with a second sample substance, taking care not to spill it onto the gel and contaminate their experiment.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN FOREIGN REPORTER | October 19, 2006
CAPE TOWN, South Africa -- After yelling to his brother that a great white shark was swimming his way, Achmat Hassiem watched as it changed course - toward him. The 13-foot shark bit his foot, shook violently and took him under. Seconds later, Hassiem was pulled into a nearby boat, alive but missing his right foot. The August episode in False Bay was the most recent in a string of great white incidents around Cape Town that have stirred emotions about a creature often demonized, intensifying a debate over how to balance safety and conservation.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH MEHREN and ELIZABETH MEHREN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 1, 2006
BOSTON -- The band manager whose pyrotechnic display set off the worst fire in Rhode Island history agreed yesterday to plead guilty to 100 of the 200 manslaughter counts filed against him, a judge in Providence said. Dan Biechele, who was manager of the heavy metal group Great White when fire leveled the Station nightclub on Feb. 20, 2003, will serve no more than 10 years in prison, Superior Court Judge Francis J. Darigan Jr. said at a special hearing yesterday. The blaze at the popular club in West Warwick, near Providence, claimed 100 lives.
SPORTS
By Sam Farmer and Sam Farmer,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 27, 2004
LOS ANGELES - Reggie White, one of the NFL's fiercest players on the field and most devoted humanitarians off it, died yesterday in Cornelius, N.C., at the age of 43, his wife said. The cause of death was not immediately known, but a family spokesman said White had suffered from a respiratory ailment for several years that affected his sleep. White died at Presbyterian Hospital, where he was taken after his wife called paramedics. An autopsy is planned. White, a two-time NFL Defensive Player of the Year and an ordained Baptist preacher who was known as the "Minister of Defense," played a total of 15 years with the Philadelphia Eagles, Green Bay Packers and Carolina Panthers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | July 27, 2003
The Secret Life of Sharks, by A. Peter Klimley. Simon and Schuster, 320 pages, $25. What a disappointment. Humans aren't as yummy to sharks as we thought. As a matter of fact, in the eyes of a great white, we're the lima beans of snack foods. Marine biologist A. Peter Klimley should know. He has spent more than three decades studying sharks, their behavior and habitat. His first book, Great White Sharks: The Biology of Carcharodon carcharias, was a scientific volume. This book, The Secret Life of Sharks, is meant for those of us propped up this summer in a beach chair, cool drink by our sides.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | March 16, 1997
Doug Moore, a community college professor out Kansas City, Mo., way, said some whites who saw the movie "Rosewood" got up and left the theater in a huff. When he asked them why, the reply invariably was, "We don't believe whites were that bad."Whites in the 1920s, Moore said, were that bad. But he said the whites he talked to remained unconvinced.Such is the tragedy of the Great White American Inability to Face History. John Singleton's "Rosewood" has been out three weeks. The film tells the tale of a 1923 incident in which white racists drove blacks from Rosewood, Fla., and then burned the town to the ground.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John R. Alden and By John R. Alden,Special to the Sun | June 30, 2002
It's beach season again, and time for the media to remind Americans what might be waiting out in the surf. Sharks, vicious predators with razor-edged teeth and mouths big enough to gulp down a beer keg. They're fearless, frightening and hungry for human flesh. Nobody's trying to scare anyone, the headline writers insist. It's just our public duty to make people aware. So ignore the other dangers out there (vacationers are far more likely to die driving to the shore, by drowning or even from being struck by lightning than they are to be attacked by a shark)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Amanda Smear and Amanda Smear,Sun Staff | June 22, 2003
With Baltimore's own Tony-winning Cinderella story Hairspray leading the way, Broadway shows are attracting audiences from all over the world. Still, for some theater lovers, especially out-of-towners, planning a dinner-and-show trip into New York City can be daunting. Beginning this spring, however, those theatergoers have a new resource to call on, an opinionated guide with a familiar name: Zagat. The venerable restaurant rating service is branching into Broadway with the Zagat Survey's New York City Theater Guide, which is in stores now. Covering everything from parking to after-show cocktails, the new guide promises to demystify the entire theatergoing experience.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 23, 2003
PROVIDENCE, R.I. - Invoking a statute enacted after the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the first federal lawsuit has been filed seeking damages from February's nightclub fire here that killed 99 people. The civil suit on behalf of three victims of Rhode Island's worst fire disaster identifies at least two dozen defendants - including the state and the Rhode Island fire marshal. Attorney Ronald J. Resmini contends in the suit that the state failed to properly train local fire officials.
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