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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 2, 2014
NEWBURY, England -- World War I began as most wars do with patriotic fervor and predictions of a quick end. It lasted four years. While the match igniting the "war to end all wars" was lit by the assassination of Austria's Archduke Ferdinand on June 28, 1914, formal declarations of war occurred 100 years ago on July 28 (Austria declares war on Serbia) and Aug. 1 (Germany declares war on Russia, and Russia on Germany). Aug. 1, 1914 will be commemorated Sunday at a charity event to benefit current British war veterans at Highclere Castle, the site of the PBS series "Downton Abbey.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | August 2, 2014
NEWBURY, England -- World War I began as most wars do with patriotic fervor and predictions of a quick end. It lasted four years. While the match igniting the "war to end all wars" was lit by the assassination of Austria's Archduke Ferdinand on June 28, 1914, formal declarations of war occurred 100 years ago on July 28 (Austria declares war on Serbia) and Aug. 1 (Germany declares war on Russia, and Russia on Germany). Aug. 1, 1914 will be commemorated Sunday at a charity event to benefit current British war veterans at Highclere Castle, the site of the PBS series "Downton Abbey.
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NEWS
By Nancy Gallant and Nancy Gallant,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2002
THE MEMBERS of Epiphany Episcopal Church and Church House in Odenton honored the ministers and chaplains of World War I on Sunday by dedicating a memorial to them. A "peace garden" at the church - believed to be the only surviving World War I chapel in the country - was dedicated to nearly 3,000 military ministers and chaplains. The garden features four bronze plaques listing the names of the chaplains who served in World War I. Of those being honored, 25 were rabbis, 164 were Navy chaplains and 108 were African-American ministers.
NEWS
Editorial from The Aegis | November 7, 2013
A few weeks back, when Congress came to an agreement on budgetary issues as the national government inched ever closer to the prospect of a large scale default for the first time since the Articles of Confederation government, the deal was characterized as one reached at the 11th hour. Reaching a deal at the last-minute has come to be known as an 11th hour agreement, a turn of phrase that, like many, has its roots in military history. It is common to refer to a certain kind of no-win situation, especially one with an ironic twist, as a Catch-22.
NEWS
October 31, 2000
James Clark Jr., who served in the Maryland legislature, was born in Howard County in 1918 and still lives here. This is an excerpt from his memoir, "Jim Clark Soldier, Farmer, Legislator," reprinted with permission. I was born at approximately eight o'clock in the morning of 19 December 1918 in the southwest bedroom at Keewaydin. This was just a few weeks after the Armistice that ended World War I and in the middle of the great flu epidemic, that killed 25,000,000 people worldwide during the winter of 1918-1919.
NEWS
By Robert Taylor and Robert Taylor,Boston Globe | July 24, 1994
"I have reports from agents everywhere," says Sir Walter Bullivant, head of the British Secret Service, briefing Richard Hannay in John Buchan's 1916 novel "Greenmantle."They are, he continues: "pedlars in South Russia, Afghan horse-dealers, Turcoman merchants, pilgrims on the road to Mecca, sheikhs in North Africa, sailors on the Black Sea coasters, sheep-skinned Mongols, Hindu fakirs, Greek traders in the Gulf, as well as respectable Consuls who use cyphers."In Sir Walter's world, all races, including those "sheep-skinned Mongols," cheered for the Good Guys (imperial Britain)
NEWS
By Young Chang and Young Chang,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | February 20, 1999
The government of France honored another local World War I veteran yesterday in its campaign to reach the hundreds of men around the world who are still alive after surviving the Great War.Baltimore's Herbert W. Bowen, 100, received the Chevalier Cross of the Legion of Honor at the French Embassy in Washington for his service as a member of Company A of the 13th Marine Regiment.Last month, George Manns, 102, of Baltimore received the medal, the highest national honor of France, at a ceremony in Catonsville.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | November 12, 1993
Seventy-five years ago, on Nov. 11, 1918, Westminster resident Paul W. Englar manned a radio a few hundred yards behind the front lines near Metz, France, taking messages from airplane pilots in Morse code to pass to gunners on the ground, to help them correct the aim of their howitzers.About 3 a.m., a new sound came through his radio headset. For the first time, instead of dots and --es, Mr. Englar heard a human voice over the airwaves.He and his parter removed their headsets. Each asked the other, "What did you say?"
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | January 16, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A pale yellow sun warms the small stone blocks that make up the pathway that leads down to the wall.More than 100,000 people come here each week, but today it is strangely deserted. There is only a businessman in a suit and topcoat. An elderly woman in a wheelchair pushed by a man in a woolen baseball jacket. A man in fatigues with a bushy beard.Against the wall, as always, are the mementos that others have left: a flag, a flower, a rosary.As the stone path descends into the gentle landscape, the wall seems to rise up as if to engulf you. At the apex, where the two parts of the wall meet in a wide V, it towers 10 feet tall.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | November 16, 2008
Some 400,000 African-Americans answered their country's call during World War I and served in the Army's segregated units. And even though the armistice ending the Great War was signed on Nov. 11, 1918, it was some time before troops returned home. It wasn't until March 25, 1919, that the members of Baltimore's First Separate Company (Monumental City Guards), an all-volunteer African-American unit that was established in 1879, were welcomed home to their native city. Crowds lined city streets that day to watch the First Separate Company in a parade that had formed at Sharp Street Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church at Dolphin and Etting streets, and ended later in the afternoon at the Fifth Regiment Armory.
EXPLORE
Editorial from The Aegis | April 25, 2013
This year marks the observance of landmark anniversaries of several military milestones in U.S. history. The 150th anniversary of the third year of the Civil War, among the bloodiest in American military history, is commemorated throughout 2013. This year also is the bicentennial of the second year of the War of 1812; it was a year notable for the British Navy's Chesapeake campaign which resulted in the sacking of Havre de Grace. Notably, a century ago this year was the last full year of what passed for peace in the complicated lead up to the start of World War I. The coming year marks the centennial of the start of what was initially referred to as the Great War, but would later be called the War to End All Wars and then when another great war erupted a generation later, World War I. This year also marks the 60th anniversary of the end of a war that looms large in American policy even now, the Korean War. In an effort to ensure that the Korean War doesn't get lost in the mix, a group of veterans from Harford County who fought on the peninsula nation that borders China's northern Manchuria territories, but has been claimed at times by Japan, donated $1,000 to the county's public library system to support commemorations of the 60th anniversary.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2011
Nicole Sherry, head groundskeeper at Camden Yards, was a 13-year-old growing up in Delaware when the legendary Pasquale "Pat" Santarone, who had a similar job for 23 seasons at Memorial Stadium, announced his retirement two months before Opening Day 1991. Santarone, considered one of the leading groundskeepers in the country during his career, had learned the business from his immigrant Italian father, Val, groundskeeper at Elmira, N.Y., then a Double-A-Orioles affiliate, as a 7-year-old cutting grass.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 14, 2009
THURSDAY Candlebox Free concert? You bet. Seattle band Candlebox grunge-rocks it out Thursday at Power Plant Live, 34 Market Place. 98 Rock will be broadcasting live from the show. Gates open at 6 p.m. Go to powerplantlive.com. Andre Rieu The Dutch violinist and composer performs with his Johann Strauss Orchestra at 8 p.m. Thursday at 1st Mariner Arena, 201 W. Baltimore St. Tickets are $52-$161. Call 410-547-7328 or go to ticketmaster.com. An die Musik Clarinetist Ariana Lamon-Anderson and percussionist Masako Kunimoto, alumni of the Certificate Program in Contemporary American Music at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, perform a concert at 8 p.m. Thursday at An die Musik, 409 N. Charles St. $10. Call 410-385-2638 or go to andiemusiklive.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN | November 16, 2008
Some 400,000 African-Americans answered their country's call during World War I and served in the Army's segregated units. And even though the armistice ending the Great War was signed on Nov. 11, 1918, it was some time before troops returned home. It wasn't until March 25, 1919, that the members of Baltimore's First Separate Company (Monumental City Guards), an all-volunteer African-American unit that was established in 1879, were welcomed home to their native city. Crowds lined city streets that day to watch the First Separate Company in a parade that had formed at Sharp Street Memorial Methodist Episcopal Church at Dolphin and Etting streets, and ended later in the afternoon at the Fifth Regiment Armory.
NEWS
June 11, 2006
1917: eligible for the Great War "As the United States entered World War I in 1917, Howard County participated in its own way," writes local historian Joetta M. Cramm. "June 9, 1917, registration for the service brought out 1,193 young men, ages twenty-one to thirty-one, 894 white and 290 `colored.' Of this number, 518 had dependents, 8 were disabled, 15 declared occupational exemptions, leaving 514 eligible for service. The entire list of names was published in the newspaper." [Source: Howard County: A Pictorial History by Joetta M. Cramm]
NEWS
By JEFFREY S. REZNICK | November 11, 2005
Americans today are rightly concerned about the health and safety of our troops engaged in the global war on terrorism. We are equally interested in preserving the legacy of the "greatest generation" of World War II. But as we focus on our soldiers of today and yesteryear, we have largely forgotten our veterans of the "war to end all wars," World War I. They, too, deserve special recognition this Veterans Day because fewer than 40 survive; the death of...
SPORTS
By Bob Herzog and Bob Herzog,NEWSDAY | March 24, 1996
World War I not only caused the cancellation of the 1916 Olympics in Berlin, but it also cast a giant shadow across the 1920 Games. When the fighting ended in November 1918, the International Olympic Committee decided to award the Games to Antwerp, Belgium. The decision was meant to reward and honor a nation that had suffered great losses at the hands of the Germans during the war years. Instead, it resulted in a spirited but troubled event.Belgium was forced to build outdoor stadiums, indoor arenas, pools and housing, all in about 18 months.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | November 9, 1996
There may be some things wonderful and noble and mythic about war, but you couldn't prove it by World War I.All of the evils that would eventually culminate in World War II, and many of the ills that continue to affect our world today, found their genesis on the battlefields of Europe between 1914 and 1918.That's the central theme of "The Great War and the Shaping of the 20th Century," an eight-part opus from PBS that kicks off tomorrow night.It's also what makes the series so fascinating and genuinely worth the eight-hour investment of time.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | May 15, 2005
SO-CALLED CONSERVATIVE commentators delight in provoking the American public into an angry press-bashing bear. Quiescent newspapers play along as if readers can be relied upon to see these criticisms as mere entertainment. In this and other ways, they become party to their own destruction: Reporters have fabricated stories, gone on the air with inadequately researched exposM-is, relied casually on unidentified sources - and written it all off as grievous exceptions. The self-inflicted wounds are ladled into a vat of discontent stirred by the aforementioned talk guys.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | April 6, 2005
They're the last of the last, the dwindling band of living veterans of World War I, the Great War, as it was called, the war to end all wars. It didn't, of course, and today, on the 88th anniversary of the day that the United States entered the war, its veterans are mostly forgotten even as newer veterans, from the current conflict in Iraq, come home. The best estimate is that perhaps 30 World War I veterans are alive in the United States, and that there are 150 survivors worldwide - a thin company left from the 65 million called up to fight the war. They're all very old now, even those who were very young when they went off to fight.
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