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TRAVEL
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,[Sun reporter] | October 15, 2006
MAYBE IT'S THE wannabe rugged outdoorsman in me; maybe it's the penny pincher; or maybe I've just spent one too many nights flipping the remote while at one too many Days Inn; but when an opportunity arises to break out the old tent and get back to nature -- in moderation, of course -- I will leap at it, or at least give it some thought. Take last month. I had an obligation in North Carolina, another a few days later in Alabama. Between the two lay the Great Smoky Mountains, an area whose green and misty beauty -- while I had passed through several times -- I had never truly explored.
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TRAVEL
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,[Sun reporter] | October 15, 2006
MAYBE IT'S THE wannabe rugged outdoorsman in me; maybe it's the penny pincher; or maybe I've just spent one too many nights flipping the remote while at one too many Days Inn; but when an opportunity arises to break out the old tent and get back to nature -- in moderation, of course -- I will leap at it, or at least give it some thought. Take last month. I had an obligation in North Carolina, another a few days later in Alabama. Between the two lay the Great Smoky Mountains, an area whose green and misty beauty -- while I had passed through several times -- I had never truly explored.
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NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1998
GATLINBURG, Tenn. -- The spine-tingling howl of the wolf rarely heard these days across most of this vast country, is fading from another outpost.Sometime this fall, wildlife biologists will trap the last four red wolves still loose in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which straddles the Tennessee-North Carolina border.Their capture will end a nine-year struggle to reintroduce the endangered animals here, in one of the largest tracts of wilderness left in the eastern United States.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 29, 2002
WASHINGTON - A 10-year government study of air quality at major national parks found foliage-killing ozone levels rising at 20 of the 32 parks surveyed, including Yellowstone, Shenandoah, the Great Smoky Mountains and the Everglades. About half of 29 parks surveyed for acid rain were found to have continuing or worsening problems from nitrate deposits. Sulfate concentrations associated with acid rain were on the rise in five parks, with Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore reporting a slight decrease.
NEWS
By CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 29, 2002
WASHINGTON - A 10-year government study of air quality at major national parks found foliage-killing ozone levels rising at 20 of the 32 parks surveyed, including Yellowstone, Shenandoah, the Great Smoky Mountains and the Everglades. About half of 29 parks surveyed for acid rain were found to have continuing or worsening problems from nitrate deposits. Sulfate concentrations associated with acid rain were on the rise in five parks, with Indiana Dunes National Lakeshore reporting a slight decrease.
FEATURES
By Paula Crouch Thrasher and Paula Crouch Thrasher,COX NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1997
Nantahala. The word tumbles off the tongue like a cascade. It is the melodic name the Cherokees gave to a dramatic cleft in the fabulously green mountains of western North Carolina. It means "land of the noonday sun," so designated because the gorge is so deep and the slopes so densely vegetated that the light penetrates only when the sun is highest in the sky.Early on a recent Saturday, after an intense overnight spring thunderstorm, the Great Smoky Mountains Railroad chugged westward out of Bryson City along the Tuckasegee River toward Fontana Lake and the Nantahala River Gorge beyond.
FEATURES
By Mike Steere and By Mike Steere,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 6, 1997
Nature is indifferent to man-made boundaries.The U.S. government, on the other hand, adores them. It carves its hundreds of millions of acres of recreational land into national parks, forests, refuges and other vast holdings that cover much of the country.Lesser-known wilds often share the parkland's famous scenery.Old-growth woods and mountains in the forest service's Citico Creek Wildernesses, for example, are pretty much indistinguishable from the Smokies' best backcountry -- except they're quieter.
NEWS
November 19, 1997
Saul Chaplin,85, a three-time Academy Award winner who shared Oscars for scoring the musicals "An American in Paris," "Seven Brides for Seven Brothers" and "West Side Story," died Saturday. The composer, arranger and producer, who worked on 60 motion pictures, died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles from injuries he suffered in a fall.Dr. Aaron Jack Sharp,94, a botanist and co-author of a popular guidebook on mountain wildflowers, died of cancer Sunday in Knoxville, Tenn. The author of more than 200 publications, his "Great Smoky Mountains Wildflowers" guidebook had eight printings, sold nearly 200,000 copies and became one of the UT Press' best-selling titles.
NEWS
October 9, 2002
Boyd Evison, 69, whose career in the National Park Service included overseeing the Exxon Valdez oil spill, died Friday in Beverly Hills, Calif., of cancer. During his 42 years in the Park Service, Mr. Evison held positions including superintendent of Saguaro National Monument and later the Horace Albright Training Center in Grand Canyon National Park, where he influenced many future employees of the Park Service. He also was superintendent of Great Smoky Mountains National Park, assistant director for park operations in Washington, and Grand Canyon's interim superintendent.
NEWS
By Cox News Service | February 19, 1992
ATLANTA -- The red wolf, a shy animal that preys on white-tailed deer, rodents and other small mammals, inhabited the Southeast for hundreds of thousands of years before being almost wiped out by humans.Almost extinct two decades ago, it is making a comeback after being reintroduced into the wild, federal officials say. A mother, father and two female puppies were released in November in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, the latest phase of a federal effort dating from the 1970s."They're doing well; they seem to be maintaining themselves," says Gary Henry, coordinator of the red wolf project for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | October 25, 1998
GATLINBURG, Tenn. -- The spine-tingling howl of the wolf rarely heard these days across most of this vast country, is fading from another outpost.Sometime this fall, wildlife biologists will trap the last four red wolves still loose in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, which straddles the Tennessee-North Carolina border.Their capture will end a nine-year struggle to reintroduce the endangered animals here, in one of the largest tracts of wilderness left in the eastern United States.
FEATURES
By Mike Steere and By Mike Steere,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 6, 1997
Nature is indifferent to man-made boundaries.The U.S. government, on the other hand, adores them. It carves its hundreds of millions of acres of recreational land into national parks, forests, refuges and other vast holdings that cover much of the country.Lesser-known wilds often share the parkland's famous scenery.Old-growth woods and mountains in the forest service's Citico Creek Wildernesses, for example, are pretty much indistinguishable from the Smokies' best backcountry -- except they're quieter.
FEATURES
By Paula Crouch Thrasher and Paula Crouch Thrasher,COX NEWS SERVICE | June 1, 1997
Nantahala. The word tumbles off the tongue like a cascade. It is the melodic name the Cherokees gave to a dramatic cleft in the fabulously green mountains of western North Carolina. It means "land of the noonday sun," so designated because the gorge is so deep and the slopes so densely vegetated that the light penetrates only when the sun is highest in the sky.Early on a recent Saturday, after an intense overnight spring thunderstorm, the Great Smoky Mountains Railroad chugged westward out of Bryson City along the Tuckasegee River toward Fontana Lake and the Nantahala River Gorge beyond.
NEWS
May 10, 2006
Ralph A. Planta, a truck driver and retired steel company foreman, died of bladder cancer May 3 at a hospital in Lima, Ohio. The former Essex and Bel Air resident was 65. Mr. Planta was born and raised in Detroit and attended the University of Michigan. After serving in the Army as a security specialist, he began working in 1963 at Bethlehem Steel's Sparrows Point plant. In 1987, he retired from Bethlehem as a general foreman and moved to Wapakoneta, Ohio, where for the last 17 years he had been a truck driver for Whiteline Express.
NEWS
March 29, 2007
Kevin Francis McKinley, a certified financial planner and former Towson resident, died of cancer Friday at a hospital in Oak Ridge, Tenn. He was 54. Mr. McKinley was born in Baltimore and raised in Towson. He was a 1970 graduate of Towson High School and earned a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from the University of Alabama in 1974. Mr. McKinley later earned a master's degree in business from Loyola College and law and master's degrees from the University of Baltimore. He began his business career with BGE as an engineer and later joined the company's financial department.
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