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NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 14, 2003
SALT LAKE CITY - As the sun begins to set, light pours from the sky like water from a tipped pitcher. The Wasatch Mountains glow mauve and pink against the deepening gray-blue dusk. Antelope Island seems to rise from the mist. But where the fading rays of light should be glinting off darkening waters, there is no water to be seen, only cracked gray mud, with grasses turning brown along beaches where waves should be lapping. The Great Salt Lake has disappeared here, just outside Salt Lake City, along the first mile of the causeway leading from the mainland to Antelope Island, a refuge for coyotes, bison, bobcats and antelope.
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NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | March 10, 2010
The snow is melting in the woods of North Carolina, and the kudzu is greening up. This ravenous, pea-like vine was introduced to prevent soil erosion and now it is devouring the South, which goes to show you that some solutions are worse than the problem. Likewise, the judge in Yolo County, Calif., near Sacramento, who sentenced a man to seven years in prison for stealing a $3.99 bag of shredded cheese. Under California's unique three-strikes sentencing scheme, additional crimes become felonies even if they are minor misdemeanors.
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NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2000
SALTAIR, Utah - You can see it from space and smell it from miles away. The Great Salt Lake, a briny bowl of broth, is a natural wonder and a freak show rolled into one. Tourists, holding their noses, tiptoe over clumps of stinking algae and gingerly lower themselves into the super-salty water to bob on the surface for a quick snapshot. Then they dart, squealing, to the outdoor showers to wash away the salt. Don't rinse off, and you look like a sugared doughnut. "It's like sitting in a lawn chair," jokes Michael Ray Myers, an employee of the Saltair resort, as he watches the show.
NEWS
By Judith Graham and Judith Graham,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 14, 2003
SALT LAKE CITY - As the sun begins to set, light pours from the sky like water from a tipped pitcher. The Wasatch Mountains glow mauve and pink against the deepening gray-blue dusk. Antelope Island seems to rise from the mist. But where the fading rays of light should be glinting off darkening waters, there is no water to be seen, only cracked gray mud, with grasses turning brown along beaches where waves should be lapping. The Great Salt Lake has disappeared here, just outside Salt Lake City, along the first mile of the causeway leading from the mainland to Antelope Island, a refuge for coyotes, bison, bobcats and antelope.
NEWS
By Garrison Keillor | March 10, 2010
The snow is melting in the woods of North Carolina, and the kudzu is greening up. This ravenous, pea-like vine was introduced to prevent soil erosion and now it is devouring the South, which goes to show you that some solutions are worse than the problem. Likewise, the judge in Yolo County, Calif., near Sacramento, who sentenced a man to seven years in prison for stealing a $3.99 bag of shredded cheese. Under California's unique three-strikes sentencing scheme, additional crimes become felonies even if they are minor misdemeanors.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | October 27, 2001
What's that? You didn't realize your hometown was in the running to be an Olympic site? Of course you didn't. Because almost anytime anybody other than your hometown paper mentions it, it's always the "Washington" bid for the Olympics. Or the "Washington region." As Jan Brady might pout: "Washington, Washington, Washington!" But enough whining. We may be the silent partner in this bid now, but we've got another year to help sell the U.S. Olympic Committee on holding the 2012 Summer Games here.
NEWS
November 11, 2005
On November 6, 2005, ELSA GUTKNECHT ALLISON, a resident of the Presbyterian Home of Maryland, Towson, Maryland, beloved wife of the late Charles L. Allison, Jr. and Leif Erichsen. Beloved mother of Sonia Bell and the late Elsa Jeanette Andrews. Devoted grandmother of Diane Andrews, Bridget Mainley, Valerie Burns, Sean Jones and Eric Andrews. Dear aunt of Eileen Price, June Luerssen, John Worden and the late Carroll Gutknecht. Also survived by seven great-grandchildren and several cousins.
NEWS
January 11, 2000
This is an edited excerpt of an editorial from the Philadelphia Inquirer, which was published yesterday. ALASKA has Mount McKinley. Arizona has the Grand Canyon. Utah has the Great Salt Lake. New Jersey has -- The Turnpike. Identification with a roadway isn't necessarily bad. Consider California's Highway 1, Virginia's Skyline Drive or Montana's Going-to-the-Sun Road. Unfortunately, the New Jersey Turnpike conjures images of belching smokestacks, not misted mountains or crashing surf.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2002
Excerpted from "A letter to Olympic Winter Games Credentialed Media from Bob Condron," director of media services, U.S. Olympic Committee: ... Some last minute thoughts, notes, survival techniques and tips as you continue your Olympic journey to the Great Salt Lake. Remember the three C's of the Olympics: * Credential * Cell Phone * Clothes Be sure and have them with you at all times. Security Please check your frustration and impatience at the door. ... Access to any secured area will not remind anyone of the Oklahoma Land Rush.
NEWS
June 28, 1997
ONE HUNDRED FIFTY years ago this summer, Brigham Young and 147 of his Mormon followers reached the Valley of the Great Salt Lake, the "New Zion" of what was to become the most successful of religions that originated in this country.It had been a long, arduous journey by foot and ox-drawn wagon, one that tested the faith and endurance of those fleeing the wrath and intolerance of mobs that had harassed Mormons from New York to Ohio to Missouri, finally martyring the founding prophet, Joseph Smith, at a jail in Carthage, Ill.Several hundred Mormons and Western frontier buffs are now in the process of retracing the trail blazed by the Mormon pioneers -- trudging and rumbling 1,297 miles across Iowa and Nebraska and Wyoming until they come, on July 24, to that western vista in Utah's Wasatch Range where Brigham Young proclaimed, "This is the place."
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | October 23, 2000
SALTAIR, Utah - You can see it from space and smell it from miles away. The Great Salt Lake, a briny bowl of broth, is a natural wonder and a freak show rolled into one. Tourists, holding their noses, tiptoe over clumps of stinking algae and gingerly lower themselves into the super-salty water to bob on the surface for a quick snapshot. Then they dart, squealing, to the outdoor showers to wash away the salt. Don't rinse off, and you look like a sugared doughnut. "It's like sitting in a lawn chair," jokes Michael Ray Myers, an employee of the Saltair resort, as he watches the show.
NEWS
August 13, 2003
JUST WHEN SUMMER'S news of smoggy air, polluted waterways and degraded parks seemed it couldn't get much worse comes word that President Bush chose a candidate to protect the national environment who doesn't seem to believe in the job. Three-term Utah Gov. Michael O. Leavitt, who shares with Mr. Bush a Westerner's aversion to federal regulations, favors giving more latitude to state and local governments to shape the environmental policies that directly...
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Sun Staff | May 14, 2000
"Latter Days: A Guided Tour Through Six Billion Years of Mormonism," by Coke Newell. St. Martin's Press. 288 pages. $24.95. It is no secret that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is one of the fastest growing religious movements in the world. But there is much about this church that is unknown or misunderstood. Its teen-age missionaries maintain a high profile, but its most important rituals, like the sealing of marriage for eternity and proxy baptism for one's dead relatives, are carried out in temples that are inaccessible to outsiders.
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