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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer Los Angeles Times Syndicate | September 26, 1993
Even though residential spaces seem to be getting ever smaller, individual rooms in the home are actually getting larger.These days, it's not unusual to see food preparation, dining, TV watching and family relaxation all being performed in what's known as the "great room." But no matter how large this sort of space may be, the various activities do need to be confined to certain areas, with adequate sound and sight control, in order for such a room to function properly.This is one instance when the art of space planning can be adapted to a residential setting.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2014
In the usual course of life's events, most people go to school. Very few people, however, buy a schoolhouse and call it home. In the usual course of life's events, most people go to school. Very few people, however, buy a schoolhouse and call it home. "It's old and unusual, but wears its age so well," said Heather Wirth, who along with her husband, Steve Bogucki, purchased the circa-1888, two-room schoolhouse in Parkton on St. Patrick's Day 1990. "It's fun living in a building with a past that's had so many other uses - first as a school, then as a duplex, then as an antiques shop [and]
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Tribune Media Services | February 3, 2008
Our new home has a great room consisting of three family-oriented areas: for cooking, eating and watching television. We moved all our old kitchen, dining and living room furniture into this large space, but it looks awkward and disorganized. The floor is made entirely of Wood, and the walls are all painted white. Can you suggest how to make our great room look great -- without adding partitions? I suspect that the style of your furniture may be more formal than what's appropriate for an inherently informal space.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 18, 2014
Like more and more homeowners these days, Ron Brown and his fiancee, Susan Powers, have discovered their ideal living space hidden within the same walls they have called home for quite some time. "After years of debating whether to remodel, buy an existing house or build new, we decided to remodel the kitchen," said Brown, 63, director of corporate relations at Towson University. And just like a shopper who goes to the grocery store for one item and comes out with a full cart, one remodel lead to another, and another.
BUSINESS
By Lucie L. Snodgrass and Lucie L. Snodgrass,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 8, 2003
THE TRADITIONAL living room, one of the last bastions of formality in American homes, is headed for extinction, industry experts say, the victim of changing demographics and lifestyles. Whereas 30 years ago most homes had a formal living room set aside for entertaining, that space has yielded to light-filled great rooms, larger kitchens and other spaces that are more informal and conducive to entertaining, or which better fit the modern homeowners' needs. "People think the living room is too formal and a waste of space," says Gopal Ahluwalia, vice president for research with the National Association of Home Builders in Washington.
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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | September 7, 2008
When they decided to build a home two decades ago, Alfred and Marilyn Biegel had a few requirements in mind. "We wanted an open great room, so that it is open for entertaining and gives you space," said Al Biegel, a retired Army colonel. "We'd lived overseas and I liked so many of the old European chalets, so I wanted a pitched roof," Marilyn Biegel said. They wanted lots of built-ins and convenient, expansive storage for the china, glassware and books they'd accumulated. Their contemporary home, tucked into a hillside on Columbia's largest residential lot, has a cathedral ceiling that soars more than two stories high over a living room, dining area and kitchen that flow together.
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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | March 15, 2009
The large, sage-colored house on a quiet corner in Annapolis' Murray Hill neighborhood began in 1930 as a cozy cottage. Many years later, JoLynn and Robert Sheehan decided that an addition would give their growing family a main-level great room for gathering and a little more privacy upstairs. "We actually added the addition for the kids when they got bigger," JoLynn Sheehan said, noting that she and her husband wanted to provide a spacious area for their daughters to hang out at home with friends.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 27, 2012
Lynn and Scott Wegner are used to people telling them theirs is the most unusual home in the Towson neighborhood of Chartleigh. They agree wholeheartedly, even as they enjoy the multiple renovations they have made since purchasing 1950s split-level back in 1993. On a street lined with old trees, rancher-style homes and more split-levels, the Wegners have completely changed their home's exterior with the addition of another level, dark tan HardiePlank lap siding and, most dramatically — a wrap-around, covered porch, its roof supported by white columns.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
What began four years ago as an idea for a small weekend retreat soon morphed into plans for a full-time, lodge-style homestead where Kip Fulks, one of the founding partners in Under Armour sports apparel, and his wife, Beth, could find permanent refuge. "We wanted to build a house where we could grow old together," said Kip Fulks, the 39-year-old senior vice president of outdoor and innovation for Under Armour. "[So] we had to build a home that would be exciting to wake up to every day. " Susan Major, owner of the Hestia Design Group in Columbia, was a key player in the house's story from the very beginning, as the Fulks admired her work and took her on board as decorator and adviser.
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By Joni Guhne and Joni Guhne,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 13, 2005
Furniture looking a little out-of-date? Window treatments begging for a redo? And what were you thinking when you chose that paint color? Don't despair. Decorating solutions are as close as the nearest designer show house. And there's one right here in Anne Arundel County. The 2005 Decorators & Landscape Designers Home & Garden Showcase, in the 27-acre community of Nantucket on the Severn in Severna Park, opens tomorrow and will be open Thursdays through Saturdays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sundays from noon to 5 p.m. until June 26. The showcase not only offers an close look at the newest and brightest ideas from professional builders, designers and landscape architects, but your purchase of a ticket will help to support the Community Foundation of the Chesapeake, Anne Arundel Medical Center, Hospice of the Chesapeake and the DeCesaris Cancer Institute.
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By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | March 25, 2014
Accused of not hanging up their jackets, two defendants giggled and squirmed in their seats like schoolgirls, which they were. "How do you plead?" asked Leila Pearsall, 8, of Hamilton. "Guilty," said the girls, also 8, who had the option of paying 50-cent fines or being brought up on charges. They were sentenced to 25 minutes of community service: cleaning the play room. The setting was the Judicial Committee room at Arts & Ideas Sudbury School, also known as AI Sudbury. The 6-year-old alternative school, founded in Hamilton and operated as a democratic community managed by students and staff, moved this year to the old St. John's Episcopal Church at Kelly Avenue and South Street in Mount Washington.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 5, 2014
A French country chateau on a private island sounds like something from an episode of "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous," but it can be found as close by as the Gibson Island community in Anne Arundel County. Built of fieldstone in 1926 and sitting on almost 1.5 acres of land, the house at 803 Rackham Road is an impressive structure featuring a two-story turret and a three-story tower with panoramic views of the Magothy River and Chesapeake Bay. "This house is an absolute treasure," said Ellie Shorb, listing agent with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 17, 2014
At street level, the Checkley home off North Charles Street in Baltimore looks like a simple two-story, no-nonsense Colonial-style home between two Victorian-period farmhouses. Just 36 feet wide, its white vinyl siding, slightly pitched roof and windows dressed with dark blue shutters present a tidy structure, the kind of house where children first learn to draw pictures. The surprise, just inside this basic package and behind a central staircase, is an expansive interior, 91 feet in length and representative of two distinct architectural styles.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard and For The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2013
After a four-year search for the perfect piece of waterfront property on which to build their dream home, Mike and Lana Condon hit the jackpot in November 2011. A little cottage, bearing the water damage of countless summer storms and winter winds, sat on 1 acre on the banks of the Middle River in the eastern Baltimore County neighborhood of Bowleys Quarters. The Condons purchased the double lot -- with old trees providing shade on the street side of the property and a sweeping plain of open lawn to the original bulkhead and pier on the river -- for $362,500.
FEATURES
By Liz Atwood, For The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2013
This year's Baltimore Symphony Decorators' Show House offers not only a look at the latest interior design trends but also a peek into the Timonium home of quarterback great Johnny Unitas. Unitas lived in the five-bedroom house on Timonium Road from 1971, when the he led the Colts to an AFC title match against the Miami Dolphins, until 1988, when he moved to a farm in northern Baltimore County. Unitas died in 2002. His widow, Sandy; daughter, Paige; and son, Chad, and other members of his family, will cut the ribbon to open the show house on April 28, giving visitors the chance see rooms decorated by some of the region's premier designers.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
Situated in the city's Bolton Hill neighborhood is a relatively new development of brick townhouses solidly placed among the late Victorian and early-20th-century structures that once housed the likes of F. Scott Fitzgerald, Woodrow Wilson and, more recently, pianist Leon Fleisher. This little enclave within an enclave is called Lions Park Fountains. The two-story houses hug the periphery of an open, brick-paved courtyard with benches and fountains. Large statues of lions guard the entrance to the 1980 development.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2011
The best way to view Peck and Patti Miller's home on Assawoman Bay is from the stern of their 22-foot runabout — to slice the water across the little cove and to see the gables of their cottage in Ocean City come closer and closer as people wave from the pier. "Now this is how to experience it," said Peck Miller, a 55-year-old transplant from Towson who came to work "downy ocean" in 1973 when he was a teen and happened to stay. " Ocean City can be a noisy place. This area is called 'Little Salisbury' [because]
NEWS
March 1, 2009
Patrick F. Mullaly A Celebration of Patrick's Life will be held on Sunday, March 1, 2009 from 4:00 pm to 6:00 pm at the Great Room at Historic Savage Mill, 8600 Foundry Street, Savage, MD 20763. Donations on his behalf can be made to Howard County ASPCA or Companion Animal Rescue Alliance (CARA) 3351 Corridor Marketplace, Suite 400-90, Laurel, MD 20724-2383. Flowers can be sent directly to the Great Room at Savage Mill on Sunday, March 1, condolences for the family can be sent to Norton Clouse 5251 Patriot Lane, Columbia, MD 21045 or Cynthia Hereth, 5255 Patriot Lane, Columbia, MD 21045.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2013
Driving the back roads that hug the periphery of Maryland's shoreline, there is no singular characteristic that defines the homes. The ones that date back to summer-only retreats are usually one-story clapboard structures with the give-away air conditioning unit in a window or two. Some are two-story, farmhouse styles. Many are built with their backs to the Chesapeake Bay or its tributaries. While many of this style remain, there is a new kind of construction on the block: multistory, year-round homes, with the back of the home boasting sheets of glass in a variety of casements that frame the major attraction: the water.
NEWS
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 2013
A Colonial-style house on a secluded peaceful lot in Baltimore County's Applewood community recently sold for $1,699,000, a full $100,000 more than its asking price. The reasoning on the buyer's part was clear to Ginny Coleman of Krauss Real Property Brokerage, the listing agency. "This is Ruxton," she said, matter-of-factly, identifying a well-kept, wooded neighborhood know for its gracious homes. "The house sold in nine days. " "The Pratt Avenue property was both a very special house and a very special location," noted the buyer's agent, Karen Hubble Bisbee with Coldwell Banker.
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