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By Robert B. Reich | November 6, 2013
How to explain this paradox? Starting Nov. 1, more than 47 million Americans lost some or all of their food stamp benefits. House Republicans are pushing for further cuts. If the sequester isn't stopped, everything else poor and working-class Americans depend on will be further squeezed. We're not talking about a small sliver of America here. Half of all children get food stamps at some point during their childhood. Half of all adults get them sometime between ages 18 and 65. Many employers -- including the nation's largest, Walmart -- now pay so little that food stamps are necessary in order to keep food on the family table, and other forms of assistance are required to keep a roof overhead.
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NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | November 6, 2013
How to explain this paradox? Starting Nov. 1, more than 47 million Americans lost some or all of their food stamp benefits. House Republicans are pushing for further cuts. If the sequester isn't stopped, everything else poor and working-class Americans depend on will be further squeezed. We're not talking about a small sliver of America here. Half of all children get food stamps at some point during their childhood. Half of all adults get them sometime between ages 18 and 65. Many employers -- including the nation's largest, Walmart -- now pay so little that food stamps are necessary in order to keep food on the family table, and other forms of assistance are required to keep a roof overhead.
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NEWS
By Andrew L. Yarrow | July 15, 2010
The Great Recession is not only bringing hardship for millions of Americans but is widening the divide between two broad types of men and masculinity. If you want a window on how economic hard times — not only since 2008 but as inequality has grown during recent decades — has affected manhood, take a look at two movies: "Up in the Air" and "Capitalism: A Love Story." In the first, George Clooney is literally atop the world, well dressed, well paid, slickly sophisticated, and courtier of the equally upscale and driven Vera Farmiga.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
A program that offers job training to Baltimoreans 55 and older is expanding. The Senior Community Service Employment Program offers paid training slots at government agencies and nonprofits to eligible city residents. City and state officials are expected to discuss an expansion of the program at a news conference Monday. Participants are paid minimum wage for 20 hours a week. The city has room for about 30 more individuals, although additional slots may become available, officials said.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 10, 2012
The White House is breathing a bit easier. The president's awful debate performance was bad enough. If it had been followed by a bad jobs report, the president's chances for re-election might have plummeted. But the report showed September's unemployment rate dropping to 7.8 percent -- the first time it's been under 8 percent in 43 months. Look more closely, though, and the employment picture is murkier. According to the separate payroll survey, just 114,000 new jobs were added in September.
NEWS
July 15, 2010
In these challenging economic times, public and private sector leaders must actively promote future job growth, especially in emerging industry sectors. One area where we should be looking for future economic expansion clearly must be within the green jobs industry sector. Maryland's Green Jobs & Industry Task Force has just released a series of recommendations to help grow the state's green economy. These policy concepts – crafted by a team of business and public sector experts – are meant to position our state for these jobs of the future.
NEWS
August 3, 2010
In Annie Linskey's article ("Ehrlich, O'Malley budgeted similarly," Aug. 2) The Baltimore Sun gives a great description of how both governors have used similar tactics to balance Maryland's budget as mandated by state law. Maryland has been extremely fortunate in the wake of the "Great Recession," especially when compared to other states across the country. This is undoubtedly a reflection of a citizenry that cares. Even so, that citizenry is usually led by informed elected officials who steer the ship – so to speak – and that ship is Maryland.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
That's right, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., blame the subprime crisis on poor people ("Did we learn from subprime crisis?" April 21). Government over-extension of housing funds to marginal buyers is only one small part of why the crisis occurred. Instead, let's put the blame where it really lies. That would be in the repeal of Glass-Stegall which enabled banks and insurance companies to become gambling establishments, the fraudulent and illegal bundling of good loans with bad while rating these packages triple-A, the teaming of Wall Street and insurance companies which encouraged credit buying and subprime loans, the ignorance and collusion of ratings agencies, and finally the intentional laissez-faire "putting the foxes in charge of the hen house" attitude of the Securities and Exchange Commission.
NEWS
June 16, 2012
Your recent editorial "Doing better than 'fine'" (June 12) must be a joke. Every economic metric shows the economy is in serious trouble. Small businesses are doing much worse than anticipated almost four years after the start of the Great Recession, and there's no recovery in sight. I should know, because I am a small business owner, and I am in contact with other small business owners on a regular basis. We are not doing "fine," we and our employees are struggling to survive in a business climate that has already claimed the existence of more businesses both large and small than ever before.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
A program that offers job training to Baltimoreans 55 and older is expanding. The Senior Community Service Employment Program offers paid training slots at government agencies and nonprofits to eligible city residents. City and state officials are expected to discuss an expansion of the program at a news conference Monday. Participants are paid minimum wage for 20 hours a week. The city has room for about 30 more individuals, although additional slots may become available, officials said.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | July 26, 2013
In the midst of President Jimmy Carter's economic doldrums in 1979, he sought to restart the nation's engines with a speech in which he essentially accused the American people of losing confidence. Although he never used the word, it was widely called his "malaise" speech, and he caught public hell for it, getting swamped the next year in his bid for reelection. President Barack Obama, having already gained another term despite a stalled economy in his first, is now embarked on a series of confidence-building speeches of his own. He is blaming not the people but "Washington," or at least the Republican majority in the House here, for the current economic doldrums that have stymied his own change-Washington agenda.
NEWS
April 26, 2013
That's right, Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., blame the subprime crisis on poor people ("Did we learn from subprime crisis?" April 21). Government over-extension of housing funds to marginal buyers is only one small part of why the crisis occurred. Instead, let's put the blame where it really lies. That would be in the repeal of Glass-Stegall which enabled banks and insurance companies to become gambling establishments, the fraudulent and illegal bundling of good loans with bad while rating these packages triple-A, the teaming of Wall Street and insurance companies which encouraged credit buying and subprime loans, the ignorance and collusion of ratings agencies, and finally the intentional laissez-faire "putting the foxes in charge of the hen house" attitude of the Securities and Exchange Commission.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 10, 2012
The White House is breathing a bit easier. The president's awful debate performance was bad enough. If it had been followed by a bad jobs report, the president's chances for re-election might have plummeted. But the report showed September's unemployment rate dropping to 7.8 percent -- the first time it's been under 8 percent in 43 months. Look more closely, though, and the employment picture is murkier. According to the separate payroll survey, just 114,000 new jobs were added in September.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | July 9, 2012
I know we have become a nation of such short attention spans and long-term addiction to instant gratification that asking viewers to spend even an hour with a documentary that could change the way they see the world is probably a fool's errand. But this fool is asking -- no begging -- you to see "Hard Times: Lost on Long Island," an HBO documentary premiering at 9 Monday night and repeating throughout the month on HBO and HBO2. I have not seen anything on-air, online or in print that so deftly nails one of the most important and least reported stories of our economic and political lives in this presidential election year.
NEWS
June 16, 2012
Your recent editorial "Doing better than 'fine'" (June 12) must be a joke. Every economic metric shows the economy is in serious trouble. Small businesses are doing much worse than anticipated almost four years after the start of the Great Recession, and there's no recovery in sight. I should know, because I am a small business owner, and I am in contact with other small business owners on a regular basis. We are not doing "fine," we and our employees are struggling to survive in a business climate that has already claimed the existence of more businesses both large and small than ever before.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 2, 2012
Europe is in recession. Portugal, Italy and Greece are basket cases. The British and Spanish economies have contracted for the last two quarters. It seems highly likely that France and Germany are in a double dip as well. Why should we care? Because a recession in the world's third-largest economy (Europe) combined with the current slowdown in the world's second-largest (China), spells trouble for the world's largest (that's still us). Remember, it's a global economy. Money moves across borders at the speed of an electronic impulse.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | August 1, 2010
The Bush tax cuts were a huge success, and failing to extend them for all Americans — not just families earning less than $250,000, as President Barack Obama proposes — would be a terrible mistake. Contrary to White House propaganda, George W. Bush achieved a lot of growth prior to the financial crisis, and lower taxes for all helped. The Bush prosperity was the byproduct of several multi-decade policy trends that freed markets and empowered individuals to innovate and create wealth.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | May 2, 2012
Europe is in recession. Portugal, Italy and Greece are basket cases. The British and Spanish economies have contracted for the last two quarters. It seems highly likely that France and Germany are in a double dip as well. Why should we care? Because a recession in the world's third-largest economy (Europe) combined with the current slowdown in the world's second-largest (China), spells trouble for the world's largest (that's still us). Remember, it's a global economy. Money moves across borders at the speed of an electronic impulse.
NEWS
By Gar Alperovitz | February 21, 2012
City finances have long been under pressure, but the Great Recession and steady attacks on federal and state spending have compounded local financial difficulties. The National League of Cities' annual research brief, City Fiscal Conditions, documents rapid deterioration. Reported revenue declines of 2.5 percent in 2009 and 3.2 percent in 2010 were unprecedented in severity in the 25-year history of the survey. In 2010, 79 percent of cities reported cutting personnel, 44 percent cut services, 25 percent cut public safety spending, and 17 percent cut current employees' health benefits.
NEWS
By Peter Morici | December 26, 2011
Just as the U.S. economy appears to be improving, four sets of forces could thrust America into an abyss rivaling the Depression. •First, for decades, Washington has pursued more open global trade and domestic deregulation. These unleashed great potential for innovation and growth; however, China and other nations have abused freer trade through export subsidies and import barriers to boost their economies at the expense of others. And, in some industries, a few players have amassed great monopoly power - notably, large financial houses on Wall Street and in Europe that now have an iron grip on lending.
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