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May 14, 1993
It's only a horse race, the way the Olympic Marathon is only a foot race. The eyes of the sporting, betting and horsey worlds will be on Old Hilltop tomorrow at 5:32 p.m. when a horseman's dozen of the best three-year-olds anywhere run counter-clockwise a mile and three-sixteenths for glory, fame, improvement of the breed and millions of dollars in purse and stud fees.It comes in those few magic days in Baltimore when the azaleas of a late spring are at their best, when every neighborhood and institution has a festive fete and when, with a little deftly applied shoe polish, every daisy is a black-eyed susan.
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SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | June 7, 2014
The biennial Annapolis-to-Newport Race will include new twists when the 35th edition of the sailboat competition begins next June. Starts will be divided with the slower boats departing Friday morning, June 5, and the faster boats leaving the next day. Classes starting Friday will sail a slightly shorter course that does not require rounding Chesapeake Light after entering the Atlantic Ocean. Grand prix classes, all of which will start Saturday, will cover the traditional 475-nautical mile course.
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SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2011
Danica Patrick couldn't quite believe what was happening Thursday evening. There she was, riding in a golf cart, taking a tour of the city's new 2.03-mile temporary street course, trying to get a feel for the new track that will host Sunday's inaugural Baltimore Grand Prix, when all at once she found herself in the middle of rush hour traffic. "If I was in a car, I think I would have been pretty ticked off," Patrick said. "The light changed and they sent us right into the traffic.
SPORTS
By Dan Appenfeller, The Baltimore Sun | July 27, 2013
One thing kept Jocelyn Wheeler going June 30 as she sped to hop through laundry baskets, mummify her teammate in cloth and haul that teammate on her shoulders through a mile-long stretch. It was her daughter, and her teammate for the day, 10-year-old Alexandra. The two were in the thick of the Great Amazing Race, a mile course filled with zany obstacles and tasks, such as using wet sponges to fill buckets and a whole lot of piggyback riding. And today, it's making its inaugural stop in Maryland, hitting Susquehanna State Park in Havre de Grace.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Sun Staff Writer | July 1, 1995
Remember the film "The Great Race" (1965), with Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis as contending racers in the early automobile era? Ra- dio listeners can tune in a modern version of the event via WXCY-FM (103.7) in Havre de Grace on the Fourth of July.Tydings Park, in this town on the Susquehanna River, is the only Maryland stopover of the third annual "Great American Road Race," in which 100 vintage and antique autos are racing from Ottawa, Canada, to Mexico City.WXCY morning deejays Rico and Burt plan live coverage of the arrival of the cars from 5:30 a.m.-10 a.m. on Tuesday.
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | July 3, 2000
Richard Blue Jr.'s Sneaks was unhurried early, but when front-running favorite Dawn Princess began to waver, the daughter of Root Boy quickly rallied between horses to wrest the lead and capture the $60,000 Pearl Necklace Stakes for 3-year-old Maryland-bred fillies at Laurel Park. Sneaks and jockey Jennifer Stisted completed the nine furlongs in 1:52 over a firm turf course. Dawn Princess managed to hold onto second, 2 3/4 lengths behind the winner. Late running Find The Tao finished third.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,SUN STAFF | May 9, 1996
The four-horse field for Saturday's $600,000 Pimlico Special was set yesterday.Pimlico owner Joe De Francis said this year's race is as strong as the six-horse fields of the previous two years."
SPORTS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 14, 2007
Judiths Wild Rush was elevated to first in yesterday's $100,000 Native Dancer Stakes at Laurel Park after finishing second to Your Bluffing. The Laurel Park stewards listened to a claim of foul lodged by jockey Julian Pimental, who argued that his mount had been bothered by Your Bluffing in the drive to the finish line. They decided in his favor. The revised order of finish became Judiths Wild Rush first, Your Bluffing second and late closing Easy Red third. Judiths Wild Rush broke alertly, then settled in fourth, as Your Bluffing raced just ahead of him in third.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | May 27, 1995
INDIANAPOLIS -- Defending Indianapolis 500 champion Al Unser Jr. and 1993 winner Emerson Fittipaldi, whose Penske cars didn't qualify for the 1995 race, will be in the Roger Penske suites watching the race.For Fittipaldi, it will be the first time he has watched an Indy 500. For Unser, it will be the first time he has watched it in 13 years."I think it will be a very interesting race for the fans, with the Penske team not in the race," said Fittipaldi. "Penske has dominated so long, it will be something different to see. I think the level of good drivers, the level of established drivers and the level of the rookies is so good that it will be a great race, an exciting race to watch.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | August 30, 1998
SARATOGA SPRINGS, N.Y. -- Marylanders scored a nifty daily double on Travers day at Saratoga.Two races before the Travers Stakes, won by Stuart S. Janney III's Coronado's Quest, the Maryland-owned, -trained and -ridden Secret Firm captured the King's Bishop Stakes.One of the casualties of the King's Bishop, a Grade II seven-furlong stakes worth $200,000, was Favorite Trick, the 1997 Horse of the Year. As the 6-5 favorite in the field of eight, he finished fifth after being blocked down the stretch.
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | June 23, 2013
Matthew Centrowitz (Broadneck) won a jam-packed 1,500-meter final at the U.S. Outdoor Track and Field Championships on Saturday. The 23-year-old from Annapolis won the event in 3 minutes, 45.17seconds, beating out five other runners by less than a second. "In my head, I said, 'Dominate the final,' and that's what I set out to do," said Centrowitz, who took the lead with less than 70 meters remaining. "I didn't really glance back. " Turning into the final stretch, the first five runners were side by side.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | May 31, 2013
As summer began last year, with the Grand Prix of Baltimore about three months away, organizers had sold no tickets. They had landed no sponsorships. And they hadn't put out a single advertisement. Financier J.P. Grant and his group, Race On LLC, swooped in to save a troubled race - which one business had left in financial ruin and another failed to even launch - and pulled off what Grant called a "90-day miracle. " This year, they say they won't need divine intervention.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | October 1, 2012
IndyCar announced Sunday night that it will return to Baltimore for a third year. While the city made a five-year commitment to host an IndyCar race, the 2013 race wasn't assured until Tuesday. That's when J.P. Grant , the financier who formed Race On LLC and took over operations of the second Grand Prix of Baltimore about 100 days before the event, reached an agreement on a sanctioning fee with IndyCar CEO Randy Bernard to again hold the race the Sunday before Labor Day. IndyCar's schedule includes 19 races over 16 weekends; three road courses, not including Baltimore, are each hosting two full-length IndyCar races in one weekend.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | September 2, 2012
Let's get the few negatives out of the way first. The threat of rain probably kept the crowds down. There was a re-start controversy that ticked off some of the top drivers. And there were enough wrecks slowing Sunday's Grand Prix of Baltimore to make it feel like the JFX in a snowstorm. But for an event that came together only three months ago after one deadbeat outfit stiffed the city of $1.5 million in taxes and fees and another folded its tent altogether, it wasn't a bad weekend at all. And Ryan Hunter-Reay's dramatic last-second win was a terrific finish for an event that's taken more shots than the Kardashians the past two years.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | July 17, 2012
Ryan Hunter-Reay didn't know what to think or feel after he won Honda Indy Toronto on July 8. It was his third consecutive victory and moved him into the lead of the IZOD IndyCar Series points chase. Will Power, an Australian driver who won the Baltimore Grand Prix last year and finished runner-up in the points standings in 2011, also won three straight races this season. But Hunter-Reay is the first American in six years to achieve that feat, and he has a chance to become the first U.S. champion of the series since Sam Hornish Jr. in 2006.
SPORTS
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | May 17, 2012
ESPN's Jeannine Edwards started her TV career as an in-track host at Pimlico and Laurel in the early 1990s. “It allowed me to learn television, because I came from a background of  training horses and had no TV experience,” she says. “So I owe a lot of my success and a debt of gratitude to the people in Maryland for giving me a start.” Edwards, who still calls Maryland home, is covering the Preakness for ESPN and ABC this week. Her reports will start appearing Friday on the sports channel and continue through the weekend.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman and Phil Jackman,Evening Sun Staff | November 2, 1990
One of the big names, Joan Benoit Samuelson, will be missing Sunday, but the fact is the New York City Marathon will never be wanting for marquee performers, so enormous has the event become.Samuelson, the 1984 Olympic champion, phoned regrets to race organizers from her home in Maine yesterday, citing leg and back problems. Along with a half-dozen other women, Samuelson had taken on the role of spoiler as Grete Waitz attempts to win her 10th race through the streets of the city's five boroughs.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
INDIANAPOLIS - Michael Andretti. Eddie Cheever. Arie Luyendyk. Al Unser Jr. Sarah Fisher. Even Winston Cup star Tony Stewart, who started his major-league career in the Indy Racing League, will line up for today's 85th Indianapolis 500. It's an all-star cast that is supposed to return the luster to the most famous race in the world. "This year, nobody can say someone wasn't here," said Eliseo Salazar, an IRL driver who works for A. J. Foyt. "Only F-1 [Formula One] drivers aren't here, and in the 21st century, with the schedules, that's out of the question."
SPORTS
By Chris Korman and The Baltimore Sun | May 16, 2012
Almost immediately, there was talk of lucky numbers. Kentucky Derby winner I'll Have Another drew the No. 9 post at the draw for the 137th running of the Preakness. After his horse raced from the 19th position -- and became the first to win from that spot -- in Kentucky, Doug O'Neill saw no problem. "Anything with a nine is fine for us," the gregarious trainer of I'll Have Another said. Bodemeister, meanwhile, drew the seventh spot. That, friends joked with trainer Bob Baffert, could work; his son Bode, after all, is 7 years old. But when the talk of good fortune and happy circumstance subsided, slivers of evidence revealing how the race will be run were left.
SPORTS
By Luke Broadwater and Sandra McKee, The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
The head of IndyCar, the car racing league, came to Baltimore on Thursday and assured the city's taxpayers and business owners that this September's Grand Prix would not end up in financial ruin as last year's race did. "There's no room for errors. We have to be successful and the promoter has to be successful," IndyCar CEO Randy Bernard said at the Intercontinental Harbor Court Hotel before showing off the cars and new technologies that would be used in the Labor Day race. "They feel the pressure," Bernard said of the new Grand Prix management team.
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