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By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | October 5, 1997
David McCullough, the Pulitzer-Prize-winning biographer and host of "The American Experience," makes no bones about his take on Harry S. Truman."One can debate whether Harry Truman was a great man or a great president. I didn't have any strong feelings one way or the other when I started my own work on Truman, but I concluded that he was both -- a great man and a very great president," McCullough said during a press conference to promote "Truman," a two-part biography beginning tomorrow night on PBS.McCullough serves as host and chief expert of "Truman," and his single-minded take on the 33rd president suffuses virtually every frame of the film.
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NEWS
By Laura Vozzella, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
Former Gov. Bob Ehrlich had lots of options when he hired Julius Henson , the bad-boy political operative behind the robocall that urged Baltimore voters to "relax" and stay home from the polls on Election Day. Henson's Universal Elections offers a range of campaign packages, all named for U.S. presidents. The faces of our nation's greatest leaders are arrayed on Universal's website like an expanded Mount Rushmore, each one paired with a list of goods and services named in his honor.
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NEWS
April 12, 1995
Fifty years ago, The Evening Sun assessed the history of Franklin D. Roosevelt and the prospects of Harry S. Truman. In an editorial headlined "Roosevelt," the paper's editorial page editors said:"Mr. Roosevelt's tragic death ended a Presidential tenure longer and more varied in its changing conditions than any of his predecessors had. . . Neither Washington nor Jefferson nor Lincoln nor Wilson served amid such kaleidoscopic changes."The fact that Mr. Roosevelt managed to keep a firm hold on the management of our affairs during these rapid changes shows the adaptability and resilence of the man. That he retained his hold on the minds and hearts of the American people under such trying conditions shows his essential greatness.
NEWS
By Carl Byker | December 24, 2007
"Is he a president whose accomplishments we should celebrate or a president whose failures we should apologize for?" It's a question certain to spark a fierce debate about our current chief executive. But before we begin lamenting the divisiveness of modern politics, it's worth remembering that Americans have elected more than a few presidents through the years who have been celebrated by some even as they have been deeply detested by others. Among the most instructive examples for our own times is Andrew Jackson.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | January 19, 2001
ATLANTA -- President Clinton is being hymned to history by a chorus of commentators singing the cliche conclusion that it's a damn shame about Bill Clinton: He could have been a great president if only he hadn't been so, umm, morally unkempt. This is nonsense. And, into the bargain, its lamentation usually is uttered by folks who never much wished Mr. Clinton well. Their tears are crocodile. Mr. Clinton was never going to be a great president and, flaws and all, he did a pretty good job anyway in extraordinarily -- maybe even uniquely -- trying circumstances.
NEWS
August 9, 1998
Our great president deserves gratitude, not this 0) investigationRegarding the President Clinton-Monica Lewinsky investigation, all I have to say is this: Are our lives better because of this man?How can we be so ungrateful to a great president who has done so much for our lives economically and only has the failings that most of our presidents have had?To put the president in the position where his private sex life was made into a public issue was ridiculous in the first place. If Hillary Rodham Clinton can put up with it, who are we to make something out of it?
NEWS
By THEO LIPPMAN JR | July 7, 1994
BILL CLINTON is the first lawyer-president since Ford. Bushand Carter were businessmen and Reagan was an actor.Nixon was a lawyer, but prior to him you have to go back to FDR to find a lawyer-president. Johnson was a teacher turned bureaucrat, Kennedy a journalist, Ike a general, Truman a farmer turned haberdasher turned government official. So only three of the last 10 presidents were lawyers.This is unusual, since 24 of the first 31 presidents (through FDR) were lawyers.Of course, in a real sense it is wrong to call Bill Clinton a lawyer-president.
NEWS
By CAL THOMAS | March 6, 1991
President Bush's success in leading the coalition partners to victory in the Persian Gulf War has moved him out of Ronald Reagan's shadow. He has forever established himself as Mr. Reagan's equal, or even superior -- a tough guy who is not to be trifled with and whose lips mean exactly what they say when America's interests are challenged by a foreign foe.There is but one Reagan shadow left to expunge. It is domestic issues. Mr. Bush hates dealing with domestic affairs, but he must act on them, and quickly, to move from being a good to a great president.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- At the moment of President Clinton's deepest peril in office, Al Gore was where he has always been these past six years: by the president's side."
NEWS
By RICHARD REEVES | October 3, 1991
Washington--George Bush looks to be on his way to being remembered as a great president. He is in control and thinking big. Which leaves us, particularly folks like me who don't particularly like him, pondering an embarrassing question or two: Whatever happened to George Bush, the wimp with no vision? Was that the same guy?Presidents are remembered for the big ones one, two or three big decisions. We don't pay these guys by the hour. No one remembers, or cares, whether Abraham Lincoln balanced the budget or whether Franklin Roosevelt increased wheat subsidies.
NEWS
By PAUL WEST and PAUL WEST,SUN REPORTER | March 10, 2006
WASHINGTON -- When the Republican Party stages its first 2008 presidential showcase today, at least one contender will be notably absent: the George W. Bush candidate. That's because there isn't one. President Bush and his political advisers appear to have no clear favorite among the men - there are no women, at least not yet - preparing to run. For their part, the prospective candidates are looking for ways to contrast themselves with Bush instead of trying to imitate him. Strategists say it would be a mistake to campaign as an extension of Bush, even though he is the first two-term Republican in the White House since President Ronald Reagan.
NEWS
By Tom Teepen | January 19, 2001
ATLANTA -- President Clinton is being hymned to history by a chorus of commentators singing the cliche conclusion that it's a damn shame about Bill Clinton: He could have been a great president if only he hadn't been so, umm, morally unkempt. This is nonsense. And, into the bargain, its lamentation usually is uttered by folks who never much wished Mr. Clinton well. Their tears are crocodile. Mr. Clinton was never going to be a great president and, flaws and all, he did a pretty good job anyway in extraordinarily -- maybe even uniquely -- trying circumstances.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Theo Lippman Jr. and Theo Lippman Jr.,Special to the Sun | February 6, 2000
Who were the greatest American presidents of the millennium? We have to ask the experts. Vox populi can't be trusted. Arthur M. Schlesinger Jr. surveyed 32 scholars of American political history and biography -- 30 academics and New York ex.-Gov. Mario Cuomo and Illinois ex-Sen. Paul Simon right after Bill Clinton was reelected in 1996. Their consensus finding was that there had been three "Great" presidents. Abraham Lincoln was No. 1. Franklin D. Roosevelt was No. 2 and George Washington was No. 3. There were six "Near Great" presidents in this survey.
NEWS
By Jonathan Weisman and Jonathan Weisman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | January 28, 2000
WASHINGTON -- Not once alluding to the end of his term, President Clinton used his final State of the Union address last night to lay out an activist agenda for his eighth year in office, offering a conciliatory tax program to his Republican adversaries while urging the nation to seize this moment of prosperity "to build the more perfect union of our founders' dreams." The epic 89-minute address -- the longest of his presidency -- soared at times into rhetorical abstraction as Clinton sought to frame a political future that would long outlive his term.
NEWS
By Jacob Weisberg | November 14, 1999
A RECENT issue of New Yorker magazine included a document that Texas Gov. George W. Bush wasnt eager to have published: his Yale transcript, which includes his SAT scores (566 verbal, 640 math) and college grades (C-average).One doesn't want to read too much into someone's 35-year-old academic records, which in this case are mainly interesting as a reminder of how powerful the Ivy Leagues affirmative-action program for alumni brats used to be. But the data do tend to substantiate what many have gleaned from listening to the Republican front-runner abuse the English language: The sharpest tool in the she'd he ain't.
NEWS
September 19, 1998
Where Sun's readers stand on presidential sex, lies and 0) impeachmentThis investigation is the result of President Clinton's behavior.He had sex with a young intern while some laid-off government workers were worried about putting food on their tables and gifts under their Christmas trees. He stood before God and made marriage vows that he has flagrantly disregarded.Twice, he took the oath of office and promised to faithfully execute the laws of 2his nation.It was his stonewalling for seven months that kept this story going.
NEWS
By Robert E. Thompson | September 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton must now know how it felt to be captain of the Titanic, standing lonely and desolate on the bridge of his mighty ship on a black April night as it began its relentless descent to the floor of the frigid Atlantic.The captain had two options: He could go down with the great vessel or plunge into the freezing ocean. Either way, doom was his destiny.Mr. Clinton has three options: He can suffer through an impeachment process with the expectation that the Republican-controlled Senate would convict him and cast him out of the White House.
NEWS
By Charles Jones | January 20, 1995
Washington -- WHEN PRESIDENT Clinton offered his "Contract With the Middle Class," he contended he favored such a proposal long before Republicans advanced their own initiatives. The president -- evoking memories of the GI Bill of Rights and pledging to shun "politics as usual" -- proposed a "Middle-Class Bill of Rights" that promised targeted tax advantages.Announcing his opposition to "ideas that sound good but aren't paid for," Mr. Clinton expected to reduce government spending and turn "dozens of programs over to states and communities that know how best to solve their own problems."
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1998
WASHINGTON -- At the moment of President Clinton's deepest peril in office, Al Gore was where he has always been these past six years: by the president's side."
NEWS
By Robert E. Thompson | September 11, 1998
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton must now know how it felt to be captain of the Titanic, standing lonely and desolate on the bridge of his mighty ship on a black April night as it began its relentless descent to the floor of the frigid Atlantic.The captain had two options: He could go down with the great vessel or plunge into the freezing ocean. Either way, doom was his destiny.Mr. Clinton has three options: He can suffer through an impeachment process with the expectation that the Republican-controlled Senate would convict him and cast him out of the White House.
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