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By GWYNNE DYER | April 29, 1993
London. -- Will Russia ever become a superpower again? The answer, in all likelihood, is no.A democratic, capitalist Russia that gradually restores and raises the living standards of its people will not regain its former great-power status. Neither would a neo-fascist, ultra-nationalist Russia that tried to rebuild the economy and the armed forces by the old Soviet method of compulsion. Either way, the Russians have had their turn at the center of events.Around the end of the last century, there was a rash of ''geostrategic'' theories that purported to explain why power shifts from one nation to another with the passage of time.
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FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 28, 2006
We should all have it as bad as John Tucker, a high-school BMOC (or whatever they call them nowadays) who always gets the girl, always sinks the winning basket and is, by acclamation, the coolest guy on the planet. But as Spider-Man has learned, with great power comes great responsibility. John Tucker has great power, but of late, he's been misusing it. Why, the cad, he's been dating three girls at once. And so, as our title suggests, John Tucker must die. John Tucker Must Die (20th Century Fox)
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NEWS
By WILLIAM PFAFF | January 27, 1992
Paris. -- It is a military axiom that moral domination of the enemy is more important than material superiority. ''There is a soul to an army as well as to the individual man,'' William Tecumseh Sherman wrote in his memoirs. The psychological impact made upon the enemy and his commander is crucial in battle, giving one side ascendance, minimizing losses.This is true in competitive international relations. Churchill's speeches, morally certain, impregnated with the imagery of justice and patriotism, were his most powerful wartime instrument.
NEWS
By Sarah Koenig and David Nitkin and Sarah Koenig and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | November 15, 2003
Howard Peters "Pete" Rawlings, a child of Baltimore public housing who rose to become one of the most powerful political leaders in Maryland, died yesterday at the University of Maryland Medical Center. He was 66 and had been battling cancer since 1999. Mr. Rawlings spent a quarter-century representing the city in the General Assembly. With the mind of a trained mathematician and the fearlessness of a man certain of his convictions, he used his position as chairman of the House Appropriations Committee to bring change to his hometown and the state.
FEATURES
By CHRIS KALTENBACH and CHRIS KALTENBACH,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | July 28, 2006
We should all have it as bad as John Tucker, a high-school BMOC (or whatever they call them nowadays) who always gets the girl, always sinks the winning basket and is, by acclamation, the coolest guy on the planet. But as Spider-Man has learned, with great power comes great responsibility. John Tucker has great power, but of late, he's been misusing it. Why, the cad, he's been dating three girls at once. And so, as our title suggests, John Tucker must die. John Tucker Must Die (20th Century Fox)
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 24, 1997
Cheer up. The Yanks are back in Iraq.The city anticipates a revenue surplus, but every department has been enlisted to ward off the danger.Thanks to an old KGB man's diplomacy, Russia is a great power again, in case you ever thought it wasn't.If the U.S. economy is the strongest in the world, how come so many corporations are still laying off thousands?Pub Date: 11/24/97
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | September 14, 1994
Chicago -- The language being used about our prospective invasion of Haiti is peculiarly hangdog and defeatist. It is a bad thing, we are told, but inevitable. We are being forced into it. We have no choice. All other options have been sealed off.Is this any way to wage a war? We are told we must do what we do not want to do. It is the burden of being a great power. We show our power by a powerlessness to resist this choice.There is little or no talk, here, of our national interest; just of national duty.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,Sun Staff | March 7, 1999
When Richard Milhous Nixon met Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin in Moscow in the spring of 1991, the Russian expressed pleasure at the remarkable connection between the two men. Nixon's grandfather, Yeltsin recalled, had lived for a time as a businessman in Yeltsin's hometown, the industrial city of Sverdlovsk in the Ural Mountains. "Maybe we are even relatives!" Yeltsin cheerfully declared. It was a promising beginning to the conversation, except for one thing. Neither of Nixon's grandfathers had ever left the United States.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,Sun Staff Writer | May 9, 1994
NEW YORK -- Mike Ridley stood outside the dressing room Saturday at USAir Arena, a bruise below his eyebrow, like ugly red eye shadow.He has been a member of the Washington Capitals for eight years, and has seen a lot of good players -- and not-so-good players -- come and go.He has heard all the criticisms of previous Capitals teams, heard their character maligned, heard all about how they can't win in May.Can't win when it matters.But the Capitals are playing the New York Rangers tonight in Game 5 because, when it mattered on the first Saturday in May, when the Capitals were down 3-0 in games and 1-0 in the first 33 seconds of Game 4 and could have taken the easy way out and called it a season, they rallied to win, 4-2.And when the Capitals were faced with a two-minute, five-on-three disadvantage that could have been their undoing in that game, Washington killed the penalty.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | September 18, 1997
PARIS -- The announcement that China will sell off its state industries, made last Friday at the 15th Communist Party Congress in Beijing, invites misunderstanding about China's economic liberalization.The announcement has also fueled discussion of what some contend is China's irresistible ascent to regional and even global power, challenging America's present standing as the dominant military power and political influence in the western Pacific.At the party congress, following what appears to have been considerable controversy within the leadership, President Jiang Zemin said that some 10,000 of the 13,000 medium- and large-sized enterprises owned by the state will be sold.
NEWS
By Shibley Telhami | February 28, 2003
DESPITE MASSIVE international demonstrations against a war with Iraq, we remain on course to wage such a war sooner rather than later even without U.N. support. The logic is simple: We cannot live with the uncertainty -- and the economic consequences -- of waiting. We cannot leave thousands of troops in the desert for too long. The window for war is narrow before the hot weather arrives. And President Bush would have a tough time explaining in the forthcoming presidential campaign that Saddam Hussein may still be in business, Osama bin Laden on the loose and the economy in trouble.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | May 16, 2002
Are you hurt?" e-mailed a friend in mockery of the Saturday-serial dialogue style in Star Wars: Episode II Attack of the Clones. "Are you blind?" I e-mailed back. For the latest entry in George Lucas' transgalactic saga of the moral rise and fall of Anakin Skywalker and the deterioration of democracy into despotism has an electric visual majesty and boasts Lucas' best direction since American Graffiti. All the talk about Lucas as an empire-builder clouds perceptions of him as an artist.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1999
BERLIN -- Marking a clear break with the caution of German foreign policy since World War II, Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder has laid out a new vision of his country's international role, describing Germany as "a great power in Europe" that will not hesitate to pursue its national interests.The new definition of German foreign policy, spelled out by Schroeder in an article in the last edition of the monthly review of German unions, appears to signal the formal end of Germany's self-imposed reserve since 1945, even as it underscores the country's irreversible attachment to NATO and the European Union.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
WHEN Gov. George W. Bush of Texas finally came off the fence on an issue it was, rightly and responsibly, to endorse President Clinton's decision to renew normal trade relations with China for another year. He was echoed by another Republican candidate for president, Elizabeth H. Dole.Governor Bush is the son of the president whose China policy President Clinton is extending. Mrs. Dole as a cabinet secretary supported that policy. Although Congress will be tempted to overturn President Clinton's decision for a number of reasons -- some genuine -- quick reactions by these leading Republicans made it a policy issue, not a partisan bash.
NEWS
March 12, 1999
THE Clinton administration should agree to publish as much of a congressional report on military technology leaks to China as possible while protecting intelligence sources.Republicans in Congress should pursue an even-handed, nonpartisan investigation.As things stand, Republicans are shouting that a hemorrhage of weapons technology during the Reagan administration is Bill Clinton's fault. The administration says it is on top of any problems.The Nixon administration began military collaboration with China more than 25 years ago, to strengthen it against the Soviet Union.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Shane and By Scott Shane,Sun Staff | March 7, 1999
When Richard Milhous Nixon met Boris Nikolayevich Yeltsin in Moscow in the spring of 1991, the Russian expressed pleasure at the remarkable connection between the two men. Nixon's grandfather, Yeltsin recalled, had lived for a time as a businessman in Yeltsin's hometown, the industrial city of Sverdlovsk in the Ural Mountains. "Maybe we are even relatives!" Yeltsin cheerfully declared. It was a promising beginning to the conversation, except for one thing. Neither of Nixon's grandfathers had ever left the United States.
NEWS
By Shibley Telhami | February 28, 2003
DESPITE MASSIVE international demonstrations against a war with Iraq, we remain on course to wage such a war sooner rather than later even without U.N. support. The logic is simple: We cannot live with the uncertainty -- and the economic consequences -- of waiting. We cannot leave thousands of troops in the desert for too long. The window for war is narrow before the hot weather arrives. And President Bush would have a tough time explaining in the forthcoming presidential campaign that Saddam Hussein may still be in business, Osama bin Laden on the loose and the economy in trouble.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 12, 1999
BERLIN -- Marking a clear break with the caution of German foreign policy since World War II, Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder has laid out a new vision of his country's international role, describing Germany as "a great power in Europe" that will not hesitate to pursue its national interests.The new definition of German foreign policy, spelled out by Schroeder in an article in the last edition of the monthly review of German unions, appears to signal the formal end of Germany's self-imposed reserve since 1945, even as it underscores the country's irreversible attachment to NATO and the European Union.
NEWS
By Jack L. Levin | August 25, 1998
FRIDAY WILL MARK the 35th anniversary of the 1963 "March for Jobs and Freedom" when a quarter-million of us gathered at the Lincoln Memorial in Washington to protest racial discrimination in America.One address at that historic event has reverberated through the years: the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.'s stirring "I Have a Dream." Other rousing orations were delivered by such speakers as A. Philip Randolph Jr., founder and president of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters; Whitney Young Jr. of the National Urban League; John Lewis of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee; the Rev. Eugene Carson Blake, United Presbyterian Church in the U.S.A.
NEWS
By Dan Berger | November 24, 1997
Cheer up. The Yanks are back in Iraq.The city anticipates a revenue surplus, but every department has been enlisted to ward off the danger.Thanks to an old KGB man's diplomacy, Russia is a great power again, in case you ever thought it wasn't.If the U.S. economy is the strongest in the world, how come so many corporations are still laying off thousands?Pub Date: 11/24/97
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