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By Mike Swift and Mike Swift,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 2002
THOMAS COUNTY, Neb. - Stan Pettit bounces his converted 1972 International firetruck over a sandy track past the ruins of a homestead, its remains partly hidden by trees that once sheltered it from the prairie wind. Pettit calls this piece of ground "the Garsky," after the family that lived here decades ago. Touring the Pettits' 11,000-acre ranch, past "the Garsky" or "the Kermit" or "the Ed," is a little like walking through a graveyard, recalling the names of the people who worked these sandy hills before.
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NEWS
June 12, 2014
The latest report from the U.S. Department of Commerce reveals that Maryland's gross domestic product or GDP, a primary measure of the economy's health, was unchanged in 2013. That zero growth rate caused Maryland to be ranked second to last among all 50 states for GDP growth last year, an abysmal showing by any standard. The news will likely be cheered by only one group, the Republicans running for state and local office who have been lambasting Maryland's allegedly unfriendly business climate and tax increases since the last economic recession for driving everyone from small business owners to retirees away.
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The | August 7, 2013
At The Baltimore Sun we are scrupulous about referring to the Johns Hopkins University. That is not, as some may imagine, because we are truckling to the largest employer in the city (or to the likelihood that Baltimore will eventually change its name formally to Hopkins ). That is just how the name of the school is idiomatically rendered. That is how I heard Hopkins referred to years ago when I was an undergraduate out on the Michigan tundra. It was, however, social-climbing pretension when Ohio State University decided to style itself The Ohio State University and to insist that everyone else fall into line.* Hopkins aside, the use of the definite article with the names of colleges and universities is well established in idiom.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Monday's snowfall introduced a spell of more dangerous cold that could continue to disrupt work, school and travel in the region for several days. Temperatures early Tuesday morning were forecast to threaten a record dating to 1873, with lows in the single digits - possibly tying or breaking a record for Baltimore's coldest March day. It was expected to become only the sixth time single-digit temperatures have been recorded here in March. Already Monday evening, Anne Arundel County schools had canceled classes Tuesday and Baltimore City and Baltimore, Carroll, Harford and Howard counties planned to start two hours late.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 2, 2012
The area of drought covering nearly two-thirds of the country shrunk only slightly as drought intensified in the Midwest and Great Plains, according to the latest weekly update from the U.S. Drought Monitor. Conditions meanwhile worsened in parts of Maryland, but could improve, according to forecasts. Sixty-three percent of the continental U.S. is in at least a moderate drought, down one percentage point from a week ago. In comparison, a year ago, 30 percent of the continental U.S. was in at least a moderate drought.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bettijane Levine and Lynell George and Bettijane Levine and Lynell George,Los Angeles Times | September 5, 2004
Ted Kooser was out there in the Nebraska heartland, in the landscape he loves, on the 62 acres of it he owns and monitors with what he calls "wolf vision" for late-breaking news from the natural world. Birds, spiders, coyotes with curled lips; moths so relaxed they fall off ledges, forgetting that they can fly. The way a snake moves: "All it knows is behind it already / nothing it knows is ahead." Small observations that Kooser transforms in the early morning hours into poems that he imagines few people will ever read.
NEWS
June 12, 2014
The latest report from the U.S. Department of Commerce reveals that Maryland's gross domestic product or GDP, a primary measure of the economy's health, was unchanged in 2013. That zero growth rate caused Maryland to be ranked second to last among all 50 states for GDP growth last year, an abysmal showing by any standard. The news will likely be cheered by only one group, the Republicans running for state and local office who have been lambasting Maryland's allegedly unfriendly business climate and tax increases since the last economic recession for driving everyone from small business owners to retirees away.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2014
Monday's snowfall introduced a spell of more dangerous cold that could continue to disrupt work, school and travel in the region for several days. Temperatures early Tuesday morning were forecast to threaten a record dating to 1873, with lows in the single digits - possibly tying or breaking a record for Baltimore's coldest March day. It was expected to become only the sixth time single-digit temperatures have been recorded here in March. Already Monday evening, Anne Arundel County schools had canceled classes Tuesday and Baltimore City and Baltimore, Carroll, Harford and Howard counties planned to start two hours late.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 14, 2010
G rowing up in the late 1950s in New Jersey, I eagerly awaited the Plainfield Courier-News' annual news story on the activities of the Blizzard Men and Ladies of 1888, ranging in age from their 70s to 90s, who gathered each year at a New York hotel for a commemoration dinner to reminisce and tell harrowing tales about "The Big One" of their time, which we'll be doing in a few years about the Great Snow of '10. Accompanying the news story was...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2010
Lorraine Engel of Santa Rosa, Calif., was looking for a recipe that was in her family for generations but has been misplaced - one for a hot milk cake. Rosemary Kingsley of Olney sent in her recipe for this simple, old-fashioned classic. She said this is her go-to cake for most family celebrations. It is extremely adaptable, perfectly delicious served plain or dressed up with fresh berries or just about any type of frosting or glaze you can come up with. It can be baked in almost any shape pan: round, rectangular, tube or bundt.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The | August 7, 2013
At The Baltimore Sun we are scrupulous about referring to the Johns Hopkins University. That is not, as some may imagine, because we are truckling to the largest employer in the city (or to the likelihood that Baltimore will eventually change its name formally to Hopkins ). That is just how the name of the school is idiomatically rendered. That is how I heard Hopkins referred to years ago when I was an undergraduate out on the Michigan tundra. It was, however, social-climbing pretension when Ohio State University decided to style itself The Ohio State University and to insist that everyone else fall into line.* Hopkins aside, the use of the definite article with the names of colleges and universities is well established in idiom.
NEWS
By Scott Dance | August 2, 2012
The area of drought covering nearly two-thirds of the country shrunk only slightly as drought intensified in the Midwest and Great Plains, according to the latest weekly update from the U.S. Drought Monitor. Conditions meanwhile worsened in parts of Maryland, but could improve, according to forecasts. Sixty-three percent of the continental U.S. is in at least a moderate drought, down one percentage point from a week ago. In comparison, a year ago, 30 percent of the continental U.S. was in at least a moderate drought.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Julie Rothman and Special to The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2010
Lorraine Engel of Santa Rosa, Calif., was looking for a recipe that was in her family for generations but has been misplaced - one for a hot milk cake. Rosemary Kingsley of Olney sent in her recipe for this simple, old-fashioned classic. She said this is her go-to cake for most family celebrations. It is extremely adaptable, perfectly delicious served plain or dressed up with fresh berries or just about any type of frosting or glaze you can come up with. It can be baked in almost any shape pan: round, rectangular, tube or bundt.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | February 14, 2010
G rowing up in the late 1950s in New Jersey, I eagerly awaited the Plainfield Courier-News' annual news story on the activities of the Blizzard Men and Ladies of 1888, ranging in age from their 70s to 90s, who gathered each year at a New York hotel for a commemoration dinner to reminisce and tell harrowing tales about "The Big One" of their time, which we'll be doing in a few years about the Great Snow of '10. Accompanying the news story was...
ENTERTAINMENT
By Bettijane Levine and Lynell George and Bettijane Levine and Lynell George,Los Angeles Times | September 5, 2004
Ted Kooser was out there in the Nebraska heartland, in the landscape he loves, on the 62 acres of it he owns and monitors with what he calls "wolf vision" for late-breaking news from the natural world. Birds, spiders, coyotes with curled lips; moths so relaxed they fall off ledges, forgetting that they can fly. The way a snake moves: "All it knows is behind it already / nothing it knows is ahead." Small observations that Kooser transforms in the early morning hours into poems that he imagines few people will ever read.
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - Buffalo and antelope weren't the only critters to roam the Great Plains. The National Park Service has identified fossil remains excavated from South Dakota's Wind Cave National Park as belonging to - of all things - a rhinoceros. According to park service paleontologist Greg McDonald, who made the find, the animal was a smaller, distant cousin of the rhinos in present-day Africa and lived approximately 32 million years ago. "Back then, the climate of South Dakota was more like Florida's," McDonald said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 29, 1996
BURLINGTON, Colo. -- Wes Robbins, a toddler during the Dust Bowl days of the 1930s and a wheat farmer who survived the drought in the 1950s, doesn't want to say the word now.His fields of tender green winter wheat, usually as soft and thick as a boardroom carpet, are dotted with patches of raw brown earth, and the sky arches a hard, cloudless blue, the same nearly every day for the last nine months."
NEWS
By Michael Kilian and Michael Kilian,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | September 11, 2003
WASHINGTON - Buffalo and antelope weren't the only critters to roam the Great Plains. The National Park Service has identified fossil remains excavated from South Dakota's Wind Cave National Park as belonging to - of all things - a rhinoceros. According to park service paleontologist Greg McDonald, who made the find, the animal was a smaller, distant cousin of the rhinos in present-day Africa and lived approximately 32 million years ago. "Back then, the climate of South Dakota was more like Florida's," McDonald said in a telephone interview.
NEWS
By Mike Swift and Mike Swift,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 29, 2002
THOMAS COUNTY, Neb. - Stan Pettit bounces his converted 1972 International firetruck over a sandy track past the ruins of a homestead, its remains partly hidden by trees that once sheltered it from the prairie wind. Pettit calls this piece of ground "the Garsky," after the family that lived here decades ago. Touring the Pettits' 11,000-acre ranch, past "the Garsky" or "the Kermit" or "the Ed," is a little like walking through a graveyard, recalling the names of the people who worked these sandy hills before.
NEWS
By KNIGHT-RIDDER NEWS SERVICE | April 29, 1996
BURLINGTON, Colo. -- Wes Robbins, a toddler during the Dust Bowl days of the 1930s and a wheat farmer who survived the drought in the 1950s, doesn't want to say the word now.His fields of tender green winter wheat, usually as soft and thick as a boardroom carpet, are dotted with patches of raw brown earth, and the sky arches a hard, cloudless blue, the same nearly every day for the last nine months."
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