Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGreat Performances
IN THE NEWS

Great Performances

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Evening Sun Staff | November 16, 1990
"Sir Norbert Smith: A Life" sounds like just the sort of self-important biography of an upper crust British actor you'd expect to find on PBS' Great Performances, which is exactly where it will air at 10 o'clock tonight on Maryland Public Television, channels 22 and 67.But there is no Sir Norbert. This hour is a parody. Not only has Great Performances taken the highly unusual step of putting on something funny, it's actually poking fun at itself.As conceived by Harry Enfield, who produced this for the BBC's Channel 4 and plays the title character, Sir Norbert never did anything worthwhile in his long career, but managed to be popular and well-known in spite of it.He's now a dottering old picture of knighted senility, still much-beloved by his adoring England as he putters about his expansive house, unable to remember virtually anything about his life.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Baltimore's celebration of the 200th anniversary of the penning of "The Star-Spangled Banner" will be broadcast live during a two-hour episode of PBS' "Great Performances" series on Sept. 13. The show is set for 8 p.m. and will be broadcast live from the Inner Harbor and Fort McHenry. "We are delighted to be Maryland's lead story teller, especially during this banner year," Steven J. Schupak, chief content officer at Maryland Public Television, said in a press release. "' Star-Spangled Spectacular' will be a dynamic, moving and memorable prime-time entertainment special.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By STEPHEN WIGLER and STEPHEN WIGLER,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | October 18, 1995
Genuinely great performances are rare -- as rare, in fact, on the PBS series of that name as anywhere else.Tonight's first telecast in the 23rd season of "Great Performances," however, captures a very great performance indeed. The concert, which was taped at the Oct. 5 gala opening of the Carnegie Hall season, features the Boston Symphony Orchestra; its music director, Seiji Ozawa; and the young Russian pianist Evegeny Kissin in a program of Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1 and his Symphony No. 6 ("Pathetique")
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2012
Annapolis Opera's fully staged production of Charles Gounod's "Romeo and Juliet" at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts last weekend proved a triumph to close the season. My only complaint when I attended Friday evening was the number of empty seats. Though the lower-than-usual attendance was perhaps the result of the move from the opera's usual March dates to May, the show itself was as satisfying as any this year. Based on Shakespeare's timeless tale of star-crossed lovers Romeo Montague and Juliet Capulet, Gounod's opera — sung in French to a libretto by Jules Barbier and Michel Carre — debuted at Theatre Lyrique in Paris in 1867 to mixed reviews, some critics pronouncing it tuneless.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Baltimore's celebration of the 200th anniversary of the penning of "The Star-Spangled Banner" will be broadcast live during a two-hour episode of PBS' "Great Performances" series on Sept. 13. The show is set for 8 p.m. and will be broadcast live from the Inner Harbor and Fort McHenry. "We are delighted to be Maryland's lead story teller, especially during this banner year," Steven J. Schupak, chief content officer at Maryland Public Television, said in a press release. "' Star-Spangled Spectacular' will be a dynamic, moving and memorable prime-time entertainment special.
FEATURES
December 12, 2005
Great Performances (9 p.m.-10:30 p.m., MPT Channels 22, 67) offers the 1965 special My Name is Barbra featuring, of course, Ms. Streisand.
NEWS
By PETER A. JAY | December 20, 1992
Havre de Grace.--The old brick City Hall here has quite a theatrical tradition. Over the years it has seen many great performances, including a memorable turn-of-the-century production of ''Uncle Tom's Cabin'' complete with live bloodhounds.2 Peter A. Jay's column appears here each Sunday.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik | February 8, 1991
Maryland Public Television has two hours of impressive Alvin Ailey material starting at 9 tonight on Channels 22 and 67.The centerpiece of the programming, which will be hosted by Rep. Kweisi Mfume, D-7, is a "Great Performances" production, "The Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater: Steps Ahead."The production showcases Ailey's salute to saxophonist Charlie Parker, "For Bird -- With Love." As impressive as the music and movement is, it is the narrative structure, which treats Parker as a hero on the classic hero-quest of mythology, that makes the work seem so large and shimmering.
FEATURES
By Jonathan Storm and Jonathan Storm,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 23, 1994
"Ahh, I just love culture," Miss Piggy tells Kermit in their opera-house box, at the conclusion of tonight's "Great Performances."But a little culture is enough. "Let's get a corn dog," she barks, as she moves toward the door.Does Miss Piggy typify the PBS audience, as it's seen through the eyes of the "Great Performances" brain trust? You'd think so, looking at tonight's installment, "The World of Jim Henson" (9 p.m., MPT -- Channel 22 and Channel 67).It's an undiluted love note to the Muppet master, informative and entertaining whenever Henson's creations take the screen, which is a lot. There's nothing wrong with it.There is something wrong, though, with its showing up on "Great Performances," one of the few places from which serious culture actually has a ghost of a chance to seep into the blighted mainstream.
FEATURES
By STEVE MCKERROW and STEVE MCKERROW,SUN STAFF | October 18, 1995
How do you get to Carnegie Hall? Practice, practice goes the answer to the old joke. But PBS tonight offers another way: a "Great Performances" season premiere from the premier New York concert hall.* "The New Explorers: What Darwin Never Saw" (8 p.m.-9 p.m., MPT, Channels 22, 67) -- Premiering for a 13th season, the science show profiles two evolutionary biologists from Princeton University, Peter and Rosemary Grant, who have been following in Darwin's footsteps in the Galapagos Islands.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Katrina Galsim | February 17, 2012
Tonight's another two-hour episode as the competition heads to Vegas, baby! Seventy contestants travel on a bus from Hollywood to Vegas as the judges continue to trim the roster before the live shows begin. These contestants are to perform in groups again, this time on the Viva Elvis stage. They will sing songs from the 1950s and will be told right after the performance whether they are in. Sounds pretty simple, right? Except there were a lot of great performances. And after the judges make their initial eliminations, they call the contestants who have made it through back to the stage after all the group performances are done, and make more cuts until there are 42 left.
NEWS
September 19, 2006
The contract negotiations between the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and its musicians have ended on the right note - with a two-year agreement that upholds the artistic quality and integrity of the orchestra while allowing management to live within its means and rebuild its fundraising network. The musicians made concessions - they will get no raise in the first year of the contract and have given up two weeks of pay as well. But in exchange, management retained a full-season schedule - a critical measure of the orchestra's national standing - and it agreed to restore positions and salary increases that musicians sacrificed in the past.
FEATURES
December 12, 2005
Great Performances (9 p.m.-10:30 p.m., MPT Channels 22, 67) offers the 1965 special My Name is Barbra featuring, of course, Ms. Streisand.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | March 23, 2002
We are only a quarter of the way through 2002, but I guarantee you that BBC America's Vacuuming Completely Nude in Paradise is going to be one of the 10 best movies you will see on television all year. It has almost everything that television haters claim the medium lacks: originality, edge, daring performance and searing social commentary. I love this jagged, crazy rant of a film from Danny Boyle (Trainspotting). The great performance comes from Timothy Spall (Shooting the Past) as Tommy Rag, an amoral, repellent, turbo-charged madman of a vacuum cleaner salesman working the bleak, gray housing projects of Manchester, England.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | May 27, 2001
IN THE RECENT flurry of news about school testing locally and nationally, one accomplishment might have been missed, and it's worth noting: Direct Instruction passed the five-year test in Baltimore with flying colors. In the 1990s, when the highly scripted, phonics-based program began making waves in Baltimore, there were many doubters. Direct Instruction - DI, for short - went against the teaching practices recommended by much of the education establishment. It was considered too regimented.
FEATURES
August 23, 2000
In a possible antidote to the pop-culture hoopla happening on CBS with the "Survivor" finale (8 p.m.-10 p.m.) and reunion (10 p.m.-11 p.m.), PBS offers "The Houston Symphony: A Maestro's Farewell" (9:30 p.m.-10:30 p.m., MPT, Channels 22 and 67). In his 11 years with the Houston Symphony, music director Christoph Eschenbach was credited with taking it to a new level of excellence. This is exemplified in the program honoring Eschenbach's departure, in which the symphony performed Bartok's Concerto for Orchestra.
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | June 8, 1994
It's Patrick Ewing vs. Puccini tonight, as the season's first installment of the NBA finals goes head-to-head against the season's last installment of "Great Performances."* "NBA Finals" (9 p.m.-conclusion, WMAR, Channel 2) -- This has the makings of a really good series: The New York Knicks, led by Mr. Ewing, against the Houston Rockets, led by Hakeem Olajuwon. The Knicks haven't been in the finals for 21 years, and the Rockets last reached that esteemed orbit in 1986 -- where Mr. Olajuwon and company lost to Larry Bird and the Boston Celtics in six. Tonight's first game gives Houston the home-court advantage -- and ask the Knicks if that isn't important.
NEWS
October 16, 1990
During the past quarter-century, the United States has seen something of an artistic renaissance. Across the country, museums attract good crowds, and theaters are often sold out. Music and dance lovers have an unprecedented number of events to choose from. Meanwhile, for those too far from cities to attend events in person, many of these great performances can be seen on public television stations. It is even possible these days for young people to dream of a career in the arts -- a career that will actually allow them to earn a living wage.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.