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By Michael Hawthorne and Michael Hawthorne,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 19, 2006
CHICAGO -- The idea of turning the Great Lakes into a giant shooting range didn't sit well with boaters, anglers or politicians, especially since it almost happened with little public notice. Surrendering to a barrage of complaints, the U.S. Coast Guard yesterday dropped plans to conduct routine target practice with boat-mounted machine guns in 34 areas throughout the lakes. Coast Guard officials said they made a mistake by not adequately informing the public about their proposal, which was so unusual it required changes to a treaty with Canada that dates to the War of 1812.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2014
George W. Hilton, a retired college professor, author and transportation economist whose works on railroads and shipping included the seminal history of Maryland's Ma & Pa Railroad, died Aug. 4 of heart failure at Lorien Health Park in Columbia. He was 89. "George was a great historian for lost causes and great failures like narrow-gauge railroads and the Ma & Pa," said Herbert R. Harwood Jr., a retired CSX executive and a nationally known railroad historian and author. "That resulted in the definitive histories of the American narrow-gauge railroads, the electric interurban railway industry, cable-powered street railways, overnight steamships along the coasts and in the Great Lakes.
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FEATURES
By Patricia Chargot | October 25, 1999
Four of the five Great Lakes have shrunk big time, alarming some scientists. People who live near lakes Michigan, Huron, Erie, Superior and Ontario are worried, too.The lakes touch Michigan, Illinois, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Minnesota, New York and two Canadian provinces, Ontario and Quebec. So why should people in other places care?"The Great Lakes is the major freshwater resource in the United States," said Frank Quinn, a lake scientist with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 28, 2014
For many people, midlife is a time for fresh beginnings, and often those beginnings bring the exhilaration of reinvention. Deb Moriarty, vice president of student affairs at Towson University, acknowledges both. After 13 years in Catonsville, her large home was suddenly an empty place filled with the memories of her recently deceased husband, Greg Giovanazzi, and a daughter, Casey, now 20, about to take off for college. It was at that point last August that the 59-year-old gathered up her favorite mementos, pieces of artwork and assorted photographs and left Catonsville for a Bozzuto-built, three-story townhouse in the new development of Towson Green.
FEATURES
By Mike Steere and Mike Steere,UNIVERSAL PRESS SYNDICATE | May 12, 1996
Lake Superior never gives up its dead, Gordon Lightfoot sang in "The Wreck of the Edmund Fitzgerald."The balladeer's line is about the hundreds of bodies from Superior's shipwrecks that have never been recovered, among them the men of the Fitzgerald, an ore carrier that went down with all 29 hands in a 1975 storm.But the words apply just as well to the vessels on the lake's bottom. The largest of the Great Lakes never surrenders its sunken ships to the decay, corrosion and encrustation that, over time, obliterate man-made objects in saltwater.
NEWS
By MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE | January 23, 2005
MINNEAPOLIS - The U.S. Coast Guard says it must find new ways to keep foreign species out of the Great Lakes, conceding that its regulation of transoceanic ships since 1993 hasn't done the job. In a little-noticed announcement in the Federal Register this month, the Coast Guard confirmed what scientists have been documenting for years: Invasive species can be carried into the Great Lakes in the residual water and mud at the bottom of ships' ballast water...
NEWS
By Michael Hawthorne and Michael Hawthorne,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | July 8, 2005
CHICAGO - The Bush administration laid out an ambitious plan yesterday to clean up and protect the Great Lakes, but even some of the president's allies consider the $20 billion price tag to be unrealistic. Led by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, a group of local, state, tribal and federal officials called for more aggressive efforts to clean up contaminated ports, fix aging sewer systems, block invasive species and improve the shoreline. The group, organized by an executive order President Bush signed in May 2004, urged Congress and the states to make the world's largest freshwater system a greater priority.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2014
Freezing rain was falling around the Baltimore region into Sunday afternoon, with as much as a few tenths of an inch of ice accumulation possible in most areas and a quarter of an inch or more northwest of the city. An ice storm warning is in effect through 9 p.m. for Carroll and Frederick counties, where the most significant accumulations could occur. A freezing-rain advisory for Howard, northern Baltimore and Harford counties was lifted by about 3:30 p.m. The region could soon be in for its coldest temperatures in 20 years Monday and Tuesday, after having its coldest morning in four years early Saturday.
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 14, 2000
The old Baptist minister climbed the gangway of the old Liberty ship. By the time he reached the slanted deck, his eyes had moistened. For the first time in 56 years, since he was a teen-ager in the U.S. Navy Armed Guard, Richard W. Hass of upstate New York was back aboard a ship he thought no longer existed: the SS John W. Brown. "I can't keep the tears back," said Hass, now 75, as he boarded the Brown in Buffalo, N.Y. "I fired the Brown's five-inch gun at German planes in the [Mediterranean Sea]
FEATURES
By Ernest F. Imhoff and Ernest F. Imhoff,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 18, 2000
TOLEDO, Ohio - Robert H. Hahn, a 72-year-old former seaman from Rootstown, Ohio, walked contentedly on the old decks under him at the Toledo Ship Repair Co. "We've been waiting for this ship for years," he said. Nearby stood Capt. Walter J. Botto, 79, of Cleveland. A half a century ago, he was the second mate on this ship, the SS John W. Brown, the 58-year-old, Baltimore-based Liberty ship that has been undergoing six weeks of restoration and repair here before embarking on a Great Lakes tour and a long journey home.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2014
Freezing rain was falling around the Baltimore region into Sunday afternoon, with as much as a few tenths of an inch of ice accumulation possible in most areas and a quarter of an inch or more northwest of the city. An ice storm warning is in effect through 9 p.m. for Carroll and Frederick counties, where the most significant accumulations could occur. A freezing-rain advisory for Howard, northern Baltimore and Harford counties was lifted by about 3:30 p.m. The region could soon be in for its coldest temperatures in 20 years Monday and Tuesday, after having its coldest morning in four years early Saturday.
EXPLORE
November 21, 2012
Lansdowne High School graduate Navy Seaman Apprentice Donald Johnston completed basic training at the command center in Great Lakes, Ill.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop, The Baltimore Sun | April 22, 2012
A much-needed rainfall is expected to intensify throughout the day Sunday in the Baltimore metro area, accumulating up to an inch and a half before dropping off this evening, just as the wind gusts pick up, according to the National Weather Service. "What's causing all this rain is a low-pressure system moving northward along the coast, and as that low-pressure system gets closer, you are going to see an increasing north wind," said meteorologist Carrie Suffern. "By early evening hours, you'll see some gusts around 20 miles per hour or so, maybe even 25. " Winds will lessen during the night, but it will remain "breezy" into Monday, Suffern said.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | November 15, 2011
Like it or not, everything succumbs to rot. So there was little surprise when some of the galvanized steel nails that hold together the schooner Lady Maryland failed a Coast Guard inspection two months ago. Or when some of the timbers in the bow showed signs of decay. "She's 25 years old and she's in need of a little TLC," Capt. Michael Fiorentino said Tuesday, as he watched the vessel glide slowly into dry dock at Chase's Wharf in Fells Point. The vessel will slide back into the water in mid-March after a $180,000 makeover by shipwrights and eager volunteers.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | November 4, 2011
The reproduction tall ship Pride of Baltimore II returned Friday to Baltimore's Inner Harbor after sailing the Chesapeake Bay, the East Coast and the Great Lakes for five months. The ship, which was built to look like a "1812-era topsail schooner privateer," will sail two more times — from 2 to 4:30 p.m. on Saturday and Sunday — before ending its 2011season. Tickets are $45 for adults and $30 for children 12 and under. Free dockside tours of the deck will also be given between 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. On Sunday, park rangers from Fort McHenry will be present on the ship and dressed in period uniforms to learn about the ship's operations from the crew.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | December 30, 2010
Jim Jackson, a retired water taxi captain operator who helped educate pilots on the tourist waterway routes between Harborplace and the foot of Broadway, died of lung cancer Dec. 14 at his Arlington, Va., home. He was 74 and had lived in Fells Point. Born James Alfred Jackson in Wilmington, Del., and raised in North East in Cecil County, he joined the Army at age 18 and served in Germany. After military service, he attended the University of Maryland, College Park, where he studied journalism.
FEATURES
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | November 11, 2000
It was 15 years after its sinking before French explorer Jacques Cousteau's cameras gave the world a glimpse of the Edmund Fitzgerald, the legendary ship of song and sea story. During a fierce November storm in 1975, she suddenly vanished and plunged 556 feet below the surface of Lake Superior with all 29 hands aboard. What Cousteau found in that quiet, silent netherworld where water temperatures never climb above 40 degrees and wrecks are perfectly preserved, was the Edmund Fitzgerald lying serenely on the bottom in two pieces, her name in large black letters clearly readable along her superstructure.
SPORTS
By Peter Baker and Peter Baker,Staff Writer | February 20, 1992
Fishermen who on Tuesday and yesterday applied for permits to use their boats on Prettyboy and Liberty reservoirs this season will not be issued permits until a potential problem with zebra mussels is investigated, an official of the Baltimore City Department of Public Works said yesterday."
SPORTS
By Sports on TV | August 11, 2010
TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS NASCAR Sprint Cup Heluva Good! @ Glen (T) SPEED Noon Whelen Modified Town Fair 150 (T) VS. 7 L. League Great Lakes semifinal: teams TBA ESPN2 Noon Southeast semifinal: teams TBA ESPN2 2 Great Lakes semifinal: teams TBA ESPN2 4 Southeast semifinal: teams TBA ESPN2 6 MLB Orioles@Cleveland MASN 9 a.m. ...
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