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By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | May 17, 1998
President Clinton can expect to receive a souvenir horseshoe in the mail any day now, courtesy of trainer Bob Baffert and his Triple Crown threat Real Quiet, who came away with the second jewel at Pimlico Race Course yesterday by winning the Preakness in convincing style.On Thursday, Baffert made an unofficial tour of the White House and Oval Office with ABC staffers and noted a number of racing prints hanging on the wall.Said Baffert: "Clinton was real nice to us, just an All-American kind of guy. The least I can do is send him a 'shoe' to add to his collection, and maybe next time I'll make an official visit."
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By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - There's an old saying in horse racing that all men are equal on the turf and under it. Put another way, this sport confounds sheiks and scions of American dynasties who drop millions of dollars in futile efforts to breed a Kentucky Derby winner. Meanwhile, two neophytes can spend $10,000 to breed a horse for the first time and come within a whisker of the Triple Crown. That's California Chrome's story as he prepares to chase racing's signature achievement in Saturday's Belmont Stakes.
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By JOHN EISENBERG | May 19, 1991
The owners of Strike the Gold had so much fun celebrating their Kentucky Derby victory in Louisville that they invited dozens of their friends and family to join them for the Preakness. The group gathered outside the colt's barn after the race yesterday, wearing pink Strike the GFold hats and bright Strike the Gold buttons and enough finery to fill a Sunday morning service. Only one thing was missing from the party: smiles.But there was no reason to smile, of course. This was nothing like Louisville.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
On a cool Saturday morning, Hamilton A. Smith - the programs call him that, but most every acquaintance calls him Ham or Hammy - is doing his best to do as he always has. He moves around his barn at Laurel Park, working his staff. His rapid-fire delivery is steady, always, and his humor wry. But he can be sarcastic, too. "You're never quite sure how to take him," says Sheldon Russell, the 24-year-old who is Maryland's leading jockey. Smith does this on purpose, keeping his riders and other workers - he's never had an actual assistant, like many trainers - on edge.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2005
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - The 131st Kentucky Derby gained its focal point when Bellamy Road won the Wood Memorial Stakes at Aqueduct by 17 1/2 lengths, shattering the stakes record, tying the track record and unleashing the imagination. Could this power-packed horse owned by the high-powered George Steinbrenner be the next Secretariat? Those who have watched him train for the Kentucky Derby today at Churchill Downs may be excused for thinking the unthinkable: He just might be. With neck bowed and eyes bulging, the galloping Bellamy Road has barely been able to contain the competitive rage that seems to pound inside his glistening dark-brown coat.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | September 17, 1995
ELMONT, N.Y. -- A few minutes before the Woodward Stakes, a noted Maryland breeder stood in the paddock at Belmont Park yesterday, looked at the 1-10 favorite Cigar and said, "It's like a meteorite dropped down on Country Life Farm."The bay horse, who was foaled at the Harford County establishment five years ago, defeated Star Standard by 2 3/4 lengths in the $500,000 stakes, serving notice that he might be ready to join a pantheon of greats that includes Affirmed, Spectacular Bid and Seattle Slew.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
As the man responsible for rebuilding Sagamore Farm shook hands with the son of the man who oversaw its halcyon days, Tiger Walk stood stoically in his stall. The other horses in the barn had long since poked their heads out in response to commotion created by television crews and a small gathering of reporters. Tiger Walk faced the other way, looking out his window. Kevin Plank, the Under Armour founder and CEO who bought Sagamore Farm in 2007, hopes Tiger Walk can remain unflappable.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
ELMONT, N.Y. - There's an old saying in horse racing that all men are equal on the turf and under it. Put another way, this sport confounds sheiks and scions of American dynasties who drop millions of dollars in futile efforts to breed a Kentucky Derby winner. Meanwhile, two neophytes can spend $10,000 to breed a horse for the first time and come within a whisker of the Triple Crown. That's California Chrome's story as he prepares to chase racing's signature achievement in Saturday's Belmont Stakes.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
Here are five story lines to watch at the 136th running of the Preakness Stakes. 1. Will Animal Kingdom's fresh legs put him in position to show the world he's not only a great horse, he's a serious Triple Crown contender? It should be fairly clear by now that Animal Kingdom's Kentucky Derby victory wasn't a fluke, even though he left the gates as a 21-1 long shot. No one knew at that point whether or not he could handle running on dirt, and since his breeding suggested he was more of a turf horse, handicappers steered clear.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
Trainer Bill Mott didn't have any doubts about the talent possessed by filly Royal Delta heading into Friday's 87th running of the Black-Eyed Susan Stakes. But her inexperience and temperament gave him plenty of reason for concern. The Black-Eyed Susan was only the fourth start of her career, and it had already been a bit of an adventure. She was coming off a dominant win at the Keeneland Polytrack, but just two months ago she finished ninth in a 10-horse race at Tampa Downs. Was she a dirt horse?
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | April 27, 2012
As the man responsible for rebuilding Sagamore Farm shook hands with the son of the man who oversaw its halcyon days, Tiger Walk stood stoically in his stall. The other horses in the barn had long since poked their heads out in response to commotion created by television crews and a small gathering of reporters. Tiger Walk faced the other way, looking out his window. Kevin Plank, the Under Armour founder and CEO who bought Sagamore Farm in 2007, hopes Tiger Walk can remain unflappable.
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | May 20, 2011
Trainer Bill Mott didn't have any doubts about the talent possessed by filly Royal Delta heading into Friday's 87th running of the Black-Eyed Susan Stakes. But her inexperience and temperament gave him plenty of reason for concern. The Black-Eyed Susan was only the fourth start of her career, and it had already been a bit of an adventure. She was coming off a dominant win at the Keeneland Polytrack, but just two months ago she finished ninth in a 10-horse race at Tampa Downs. Was she a dirt horse?
SPORTS
By Kevin Van Valkenburg, The Baltimore Sun | May 19, 2011
Here are five story lines to watch at the 136th running of the Preakness Stakes. 1. Will Animal Kingdom's fresh legs put him in position to show the world he's not only a great horse, he's a serious Triple Crown contender? It should be fairly clear by now that Animal Kingdom's Kentucky Derby victory wasn't a fluke, even though he left the gates as a 21-1 long shot. No one knew at that point whether or not he could handle running on dirt, and since his breeding suggested he was more of a turf horse, handicappers steered clear.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | May 7, 2005
LOUISVILLE, Ky. - The 131st Kentucky Derby gained its focal point when Bellamy Road won the Wood Memorial Stakes at Aqueduct by 17 1/2 lengths, shattering the stakes record, tying the track record and unleashing the imagination. Could this power-packed horse owned by the high-powered George Steinbrenner be the next Secretariat? Those who have watched him train for the Kentucky Derby today at Churchill Downs may be excused for thinking the unthinkable: He just might be. With neck bowed and eyes bulging, the galloping Bellamy Road has barely been able to contain the competitive rage that seems to pound inside his glistening dark-brown coat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | March 13, 2005
Year after year, Britain's National Gallery in London sells more postcards and posters of George Stubbs' Whistlejacket -- a nine-foot tall, life-sized portrait of a rearing horse -- than of any other work in its collection. It must be the sheer size of it. There's something about the humongous proportions that grabs you and won't let go. Now Whistlejacket is at the Walters Art Museum, the first time it has ever been outside Great Britain, and it's the undisputed star of the new exhibition, Stubbs & the Horse.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | May 19, 2000
When the mind ticks off a list of some of the great champions of the modern sports era, it's difficult to ponder many of them without a great challenger. Would the Los Angeles Lakers dynasty of the 1980s have been so highly regarded without the Boston Celtics, or could Muhammad Ali have achieved boxing immortality without three incredible fights against Joe Frazier? Probably not, and the same could be said for horse racing. Two of the past three Triple Crown winners - Secretariat and Affirmed - had marvelous challengers, Sham and Alydar, respectively, to forge their reputations.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent | May 19, 2000
When the mind ticks off a list of some of the great champions of the modern sports era, it's difficult to ponder many of them without a great challenger. Would the Los Angeles Lakers dynasty of the 1980s have been so highly regarded without the Boston Celtics, or could Muhammad Ali have achieved boxing immortality without three incredible fights against Joe Frazier? Probably not, and the same could be said for horse racing. Two of the past three Triple Crown winners - Secretariat and Affirmed - had marvelous challengers, Sham and Alydar, respectively, to forge their reputations.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman, The Baltimore Sun | May 4, 2012
On a cool Saturday morning, Hamilton A. Smith - the programs call him that, but most every acquaintance calls him Ham or Hammy - is doing his best to do as he always has. He moves around his barn at Laurel Park, working his staff. His rapid-fire delivery is steady, always, and his humor wry. But he can be sarcastic, too. "You're never quite sure how to take him," says Sheldon Russell, the 24-year-old who is Maryland's leading jockey. Smith does this on purpose, keeping his riders and other workers - he's never had an actual assistant, like many trainers - on edge.
TOPIC
By Neil Milbert | July 11, 1999
Hard-hearted Manhattan went to sleep with tears trickling down her pillow. And when she awakened her nightmare had become reality. Ruffian, thoroughbred racing's black beauty, was part of the past.-- Chicago Tribune, July 7, 1975.ON THE EVE of Belmont Park's great match race between the undefeated 3-year-old filly Ruffian and 1975 Kentucky Derby winner Foolish Pleasure, the story line seemed an exercise in simplicity.It was a battle of the sexes.But this story line never found its way into print.
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By Dennis Yusko and Dennis Yusko,ALBANY TIMES UNION | June 24, 1999
Art and history will collide in two weeks when an exact replica of a 24-foot bronze horse envisioned by Leonardo da Vinci is donated to Italy.The 15-ton "horse that never was," created at the Tallix Art Foundry in Beacon, N.Y., is a goodwill gesture and tribute to da Vinci, said Rod Skidmore, the project's artistic director.Skidmore estimates the cost of building the horse at over $6 million -- most of which came from American donors.Da Vinci, the legendary Renaissance artist, was commissioned in 1482 to design and build the largest equestrian statue in the world.
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