Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGreat Hall
IN THE NEWS

Great Hall

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
There are few pieces of music as absorbing, confusing, unnerving and transporting as Messiaen's "Quartet for the End of Time. " Each time I encounter the work -- the latest occasion came Sunday night at the season-opening concert for the Music in the Great Hall series at Towson Unitarian Universalist Church -- I find myself awed all over again. Everything about the Quartet is exceptional, starting with its premiere at Stalag VIIIA, a prisoner of war in Germany, in January 1941.
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2014
There are few pieces of music as absorbing, confusing, unnerving and transporting as Messiaen's "Quartet for the End of Time. " Each time I encounter the work -- the latest occasion came Sunday night at the season-opening concert for the Music in the Great Hall series at Towson Unitarian Universalist Church -- I find myself awed all over again. Everything about the Quartet is exceptional, starting with its premiere at Stalag VIIIA, a prisoner of war in Germany, in January 1941.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Music in the Great Hall wrapped up its 40th anniversary season Sunday afternoon at Towson Unitarian with two powerhouse artists -- flutist Marina Piccinini and pianist Michael Sheppard.  I could only stay for the first half of their recital (a performance of Rachmaninoff's "Vespers," one of my faves, beckoned at another locale), but it was a decidedly eventful first half. Piccinini, a Peabody Conservatory faculty member with a busy international career, established the sweetness and purity of her tone at the outset in the familiar Minuet and Dance of the Blessed Spirits from Gluck's "Orphee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
Music in the Great Hall wrapped up its 40th anniversary season Sunday afternoon at Towson Unitarian with two powerhouse artists -- flutist Marina Piccinini and pianist Michael Sheppard.  I could only stay for the first half of their recital (a performance of Rachmaninoff's "Vespers," one of my faves, beckoned at another locale), but it was a decidedly eventful first half. Piccinini, a Peabody Conservatory faculty member with a busy international career, established the sweetness and purity of her tone at the outset in the familiar Minuet and Dance of the Blessed Spirits from Gluck's "Orphee.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
The supposedly dying art of classical music keeps getting fresh jolts from all the young talent out there that has yet to buy into that imminent demise notion. One particularly healthy part of the business is chamber music, which seems to get enriched year after year by new ensembles loaded with skill and personality. A case in point is the Aeolus Quartet, formed in 2008 and currently the graduate resident string quartet at Juilliard. A recent residency at the University of Maryland also played a part in honing the group, which was presented Sunday afternoon by the excellent Music in the Great Hall . The players -- violinists Nicholas Tavani and Rachel Shapiro, violist (and Peabody Conservatory alum)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith | November 14, 2002
Another music-packed weekend is coming up. Good luck trying to choose what to hear. You might want to consider the small-scale concert series with the big name - Music in the Great Hall. Located in a comfortable, very listener-friendly church, the series has been offering a wide range of chamber music for 29 seasons now. The guitar duo of Julian Gray and Ronald Pearl will give two recitals there that sample the music of several centuries and styles, from Scarlatti to Debussy. As their recordings make plain, Gray and Pearl enjoy a tight musical partnership, notable for a combination of technical aplomb and sensitive interpretations.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 12, 2005
The local music season is under way, and not a minute too soon. What with all the dreadful news in the Gulf Coast region, and (as usual) plenty of unsettling business elsewhere, it's good to know that you can find various entry points into the rarer air of musical expression, where, however briefly, things can seem a whole lot better. Music in the Great Hall provided such an entry with the opening program of its 32nd season over the weekend, a program strong on happy endings. Framing the concert were two trios in C major for violin, cello and piano - you can't get more centered and reassuring than C major - by Haydn and Brahms.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
"I was in love with music from the beginning," said Virginia Reinecke, who first played the piano at 6 and will give a performance Sunday at the age of 90. Make that 901/2 — she hit the big Nine-O last July. The Baltimore-born, Peabody-trained Reinecke will be featured in a concert for Music in the Great Hall, the series she co-founded in 1974 and ran for its first 30 years. The series "had some bad times in the past, like any organization," she said, "but the board is stronger now and [artistic director]
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | November 20, 2003
Last weekend, like most weekends, musical activity was plentiful. I picked out four events and found rewards at each. The National Symphony Orchestra's week-long residency at the University of Maryland School of Music on the College Park campus culminated with a side-by-side performance with the UM Symphony Orchestra Friday night at the Clarice Smith Performing Arts Center. James Ross, director of orchestral activities at UM, led the first half. Perhaps his reserved gestures accounted for the reserved, bland playing of Dvorak's Scherzo Capriccioso.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 18, 2003
Virginia Reinecke remembers fondly her first piano lessons from a nun in a Baltimore grade school. And her first piano, which her father bought from the Peabody Piano Company (it sent the wrong instrument at first, much to his annoyance). And, especially, "playing for company" many a time at her parents' house. Fortunately, among that company one day was a cello teacher at the Peabody Conservatory, who recommended that the youngster should study there. Thanks to a scholarship, that's exactly what Reinecke did, first in the preparatory division, then the regular conservatory.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 2, 2013
The supposedly dying art of classical music keeps getting fresh jolts from all the young talent out there that has yet to buy into that imminent demise notion. One particularly healthy part of the business is chamber music, which seems to get enriched year after year by new ensembles loaded with skill and personality. A case in point is the Aeolus Quartet, formed in 2008 and currently the graduate resident string quartet at Juilliard. A recent residency at the University of Maryland also played a part in honing the group, which was presented Sunday afternoon by the excellent Music in the Great Hall . The players -- violinists Nicholas Tavani and Rachel Shapiro, violist (and Peabody Conservatory alum)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
"I was in love with music from the beginning," said Virginia Reinecke, who first played the piano at 6 and will give a performance Sunday at the age of 90. Make that 901/2 — she hit the big Nine-O last July. The Baltimore-born, Peabody-trained Reinecke will be featured in a concert for Music in the Great Hall, the series she co-founded in 1974 and ran for its first 30 years. The series "had some bad times in the past, like any organization," she said, "but the board is stronger now and [artistic director]
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2008
theater 'The Matchmaker': Hello Dolly! this is not. Thornton Wilder's classic play, which was the basis for the 1964 musical, has tons of wit and charm. But it makes pointed observations that were given short shrift in the musical. The show runs through Oct. 12 at Center Stage, 700 N. Calvert St.. Showtimes vary. Tickets cost $10-$60. Call 410-332-0033 or go to centerstage.org. Mary Carole McCauley art Ireland photos: Charles Carroll, a signer of the Declaration of Independence, lived at 800 E. Lombard St., now one of the Carroll Museums.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,Sun Music Critic | July 29, 2008
A few years ago, when the University of Baltimore unveiled its intimate Performing Arts Theater at the Student Center, a handsome new Steinway concert grand, selected by eminent pianist Yefim Bronfman, was part of the package. That piano will soon get a significant workout. A "Great Pianists Series" will be inaugurated during the 2008-2009 season, starting on Oct. 11 with jazz pianist Ellis Marsalis, father of Wynton and Branford, among others. The senior Marsalis is a considerable force in his own right - as a performer, composer and teacher.
SPORTS
By DAVID STEELE | July 22, 2007
Millions watched the festivities at Camden Yards on Sept. 6, 1995, when the "2131" banner was unfurled on the warehouse wall and Cal Ripken Jr. lapped the field slapping hands. To the overwhelming majority of those viewers, those outsiders, those peripheral observers, the man of the hour was an iconic figure, a symbol, a savior, a representative of their most cherished values. They don't know what they missed. Sadly, to them, by that night, Ripken had long ago ceased to be a baseball player, an All-Star, a World Series champion, a man who changed the parameters and possibilities of the position he played.
FEATURES
By TIM SMITH and TIM SMITH,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 25, 2006
Every time someone addresses the worrisome state of classical music, at least one exception gets mentioned - the San Francisco Symphony Orchestra. Since the inquisitive and inspiring Michael Tilson Thomas became music director in 1995, the ensemble has been on a steadily upward trajectory. A volatile mixture of standard and far-from-common repertoire has proven to be highly marketable. Grammy-winning recordings of Mahler symphonies - Tilson Thomas and the orchestra are putting the complete cycle on disc - have reinforced the stature of the organization.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Ronald Hube and Ronald Hube,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 3, 2005
You might expect a museum about buildings to be housed in a nice one, and the National Building Museum in Washington certainly is -- so much so that the impressive but lesser-known 19th-century structure can be the highlight of a visit to Washington. Originally the home of the U.S. Pension Bureau, the brick Italian Renaissance building is so grand that it has been the site of inaugural galas for every president since Grover Cleveland in 1885. A presidential seal in the floor is said to be the only one outside the White House.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 29, 1995
The Friends of St John's College have announced the 1995-1996 season of Music in the Great Hall.Subscription information is available by calling 626-2539.
NEWS
April 2, 2006
Carroll Community College will present the Careers in Healthcare Symposium from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. Wednesday in the Great Hall. The free event will feature question-and-answer sessions and exhibits. Topics will include anatomy and physiology courses, nursing programs, health and exercise programs, and health care informational technology. Information: 410-386-8198.
FEATURES
By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | September 12, 2005
The local music season is under way, and not a minute too soon. What with all the dreadful news in the Gulf Coast region, and (as usual) plenty of unsettling business elsewhere, it's good to know that you can find various entry points into the rarer air of musical expression, where, however briefly, things can seem a whole lot better. Music in the Great Hall provided such an entry with the opening program of its 32nd season over the weekend, a program strong on happy endings. Framing the concert were two trios in C major for violin, cello and piano - you can't get more centered and reassuring than C major - by Haydn and Brahms.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.