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By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
Towson is more than a college town. Towson Tavern gets that. The restaurant opened on New Year's Eve 2011 on York Road, near the Towson Circle. The area is well-known for bars and pubs, but Towson Tavern stands out from the pack: Instead of catering to college students, it's geared toward adults. At Towson Tavern, that maturity manifests in an interesting selection of cocktails, a sophisticated menu and sharp service. Executive Chef Tyson Spangler was at The Capital Grille prior to running the kitchen at Towson Tavern; General Manager Michael Velleggia was part of the Capital Grille team, as well.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
For more than a century, the family behind Trinacria Foods has been a reliable source for great Italian food products. The family's flagship location - a shop and deli on North Paca Street - is the kind of spot that inspires loyalty, even love. Between the gigantic sandwiches, the sweet Italian treats and the unbelievably low-priced bottles of wine, there's a lot to like. The family's new Mount Vernon outpost, Trinacria Cafe, opened earlier this year to an enthusiastic reception.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Like a lot of taverns in the Baltimore area, the Yellow Dog Tavern in Canton has a lively first floor dominated by the bar and a quieter second floor filled with tables and chairs. When my wife and I showed up there for dinner on a recent weeknight, we picked the upstairs dining area. It is a lovely space, with windows looking out on neighborhood rowhouses. Framed photos of dogs owned by staff members serve as decoration, along with paintings hanging on the brick walls. While almost every seat was taken downstairs, we had plenty of privacy upstairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | April 1, 2014
Tucked in a corner of an older shopping center in Ellicott City, from the outside, White Oak Tavern is unassuming and nearly anonymous. But that's just the facade. Inside, White Oak (named for Maryland's state tree) is warm and food-centric, with an impressive craft beer selection and a well-executed menu that shines a light on local farmers. Scene & Decor White Oak's space is open and airy, with a large bar to the right, a dining room to the left and, in keeping with the "oak" theme, wood everywhere, from the floors to the benches to the walls.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie | December 4, 1994
"The Great Food Almanac" is a hard-to-describe but easy-to-like new book that deals with an enormous variety of foods and food issues, from facts about figs, to egg grading, to how to find a nutritionist, to pet food, to tofu. The large-format book, by food professional Irina Chalmers (HarperCollins, $25), is a smorgasbord of fact and fun. Under M, there's this on melons: "Half a 5-inch cantaloupe contains 100 percent of the recommended daily allowance of vitamins A and C; it is rich in beta carotene, has plenty of fiber, adds only 59 calories -- and tastes great too."
NEWS
By [MICHELLE DEAL-ZIMMERMAN] | May 6, 2007
Home is where the heart is" applies to Baltimore native Chickie Grayson. Early on, the president of Enterprise Homes lived in the up-and-coming Reservoir Hill. Decades later, she's moved on to another home in the city, and urban renewal is everywhere. Still, affordable housing for seniors and families is scarce, says Grayson, 60. Enterprise Homes, affiliated with the national nonprofit Enterprise Community Partners, created by James W. Rouse and his wife, Patty, has developed more than 5,000 units of affordable housing in the mid-Atlantic region.
NEWS
By elizabeth large | September 10, 2008
A reader asked for a list of restaurants that are quiet, relaxing and not too pricey. Here are my suggestions. Note that they are listed in alphabetical order: 1 Ambassador in Homewood: 2 Cafe Troia in Towson: 3 Carlyle Club in Homewood: 4 Ciao Bella in Little Italy: 5 Cynthia's in Severna Park : 6 Dogwood in Hampden : 7 Mia Carolina in Glyndon: 8 Orchard Market & Cafe in Towson: 9 Patrick's in Cockeysville: 10 Spice Company in Homewood:...
NEWS
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | July 31, 2002
An unopened watermelon makes a great musical instrument: thunkachunkathunkachunkathunk. And provides instant competition: Who can capture the greased watermelon tossed into the deep end of the pool? Slice it open, you've got a party. It's proof that summer food is as much about companionship as taste. Like steamed crabs and corn-on-the-cob, watermelon is the stuff of fellowship. It tastes best outdoors, on the back porch or in the back yard, served in huge, dripping quantities. With its seeds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Dorothy Fleetwood | October 19, 1995
Colonial MarylandMontpelier, the elegant 18th century mansion in Laurel, will offer visitors a glimpse of its past when the Friends of Montpelier present Colonial Day Sunday from noon to 5 p.m. The event is free and will be held rain or shine.The grounds will be alive with colonial-style artisans demonstrating their trades. Among them you'll see a paper-maker, cordwainer (shoemaker), spinners, a blacksmith and some sutlers, who will be on hand with a few items for sale. There will also be a Revolutionary War encampment set up on the grounds, and soldiers will participate in battle re-enactments.
NEWS
By TIM WARREN THE AXEMAN'S JAZZ. Julie Smith. St. Martin's. 341 pages. $19.95 | September 22, 1991
JUST BEFORE DARK:COLLECTED NONFICTION.Jim Harrison.Clark City Press.320 pages. $24.95. Jim Harrison is a fine writer of fiction (especially his novellas) and poetry, and a crusty old soul who probably wouldn't mind jabbing you in the chest to make a point. Writing from rural Michigan, he loves hunting, fishing, great food (and great quantities of it) and solitude. He's the rare sort who can dress the deer he just killed and also quote extensively from little-known Russian poets.What comes through in this collection of essays, magazine pieces and other assorted writings is exactly this mixture of the comic, the gentle and the quarrelsome.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | October 9, 2013
Darker Than Blue, Casey Jenkins' white-tablecloth soul food cafe on Greenmount Avenue, will close at the end of October. The restaurant's last day is Oct. 31, according to Jenkins. "It's not really bittersweet," Jenkins said about leaving his Waverly cafe. "We've been able to outgrow our current location. We had always been looking for ways to expand. " Jenkins said he is in negotiations to relocate Darker Than Blue to the mixed-use retail and residential complex being developed on the 3200 block of St. Paul Street in Charles Village. The Charles Village location would have a liquor license, Jenkins said, something the Greenmount Avenue location didn't have.
NEWS
September 29, 2013
The Food Network's “The Great Food Truck Race” series has its finale airing tonight in an episode that was filmed in June in Annapolis. The Food Network's website describes the show as "a multi-week showdown that challenges food truck teams to outsell one another in a coast-to-coast road trip.” The three teams in the finale were Tikka Tikka Taco from St. Louis, Aloha Plate Truck from Hawaii and Samboni Boys from Philadelphia. The winning team in the contest gets $50,000 and its own food truck.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2013
Annapolis will get a taste of food truck culture this week as the Food Network's "Great Food Truck Race" rolls into town Friday. Co-executive producer Peter Woronov confirmed that Annapolis filming would begin Friday for the show, which the Food Network's website describes as "a multi-week showdown that challenges food truck teams to outsell one another in a coast-to-coast road trip. " But he was tight-lipped on other details, not wanting to tip off the contestants to what challenges lay ahead.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 26, 2013
Towson is more than a college town. Towson Tavern gets that. The restaurant opened on New Year's Eve 2011 on York Road, near the Towson Circle. The area is well-known for bars and pubs, but Towson Tavern stands out from the pack: Instead of catering to college students, it's geared toward adults. At Towson Tavern, that maturity manifests in an interesting selection of cocktails, a sophisticated menu and sharp service. Executive Chef Tyson Spangler was at The Capital Grille prior to running the kitchen at Towson Tavern; General Manager Michael Velleggia was part of the Capital Grille team, as well.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2013
Willow manages to be a lot of things all at once. The Fells Point restaurant, opened in July by the team behind RYE and Stuggy's, shares its name with the graceful weeping willow tree. With gray walls, hanging lanterns and gauzy curtains, Willow's interior is in sync with the moody look of its namesake. The space - like the staff - is casual but stylish. Willow's menu, on the other hand, is full of fresh takes on Tex-Mex and bar-friendly pizzas and burgers. Flavors occasionally veer into sophisticated territory, but overall, the food is straightforward, fun and approachable.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Houser III, Special To The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2011
Sometimes, eating at a restaurant is all about the adventure. You can try a dish you've never had before, and maybe even come home with a story to share with friends. At Mat Jip in Charles Village , you might just find both. Mat Jip, which means "Taste House" in Korean, has taken over the space once filled by Famous Yakitori One. A small restaurant to begin with, it has none of the previous tenant's hipster panache. The place is seriously stripped down: A few sheets of paper with house specialties are taped to the stark white walls, and blinds hang from the ceiling, in between tables, to help sequester diners.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Restaurant Critic | January 1, 1993
Tucked away in back of the Lake Falls Village shopping center is a small restaurant called the Panda Chinese Gourmet. It's the neighborhood Chinese restaurant, the place where you get your carryout lo mein on the way home from work. Or -- when convenience is more important than great food - you stop here for a bite to eat.It performs this useful function very well. This is a pretty dining room and, maybe more importantly, a soothing one. The colors are shades of blond and beige, the dominant motif is bamboo, and, of course, there are pandas.
FEATURES
By ELIZABETH LARGE | June 5, 1994
Chart House, 601 E. Pratt St., (410) 539-6616. Open every day for lunch and dinner. Major credit cards. Prices: appetizers, $4.95-$8.95; entrees, $14.95-$32.95. *1/2Every year just about now the calls start coming in -- people wanting me to recommend a seafood restaurant. Mostly they're tourists, and they not only want to know what Baltimore's best seafood restaurant is, they want it to be at the harbor. Theyaren't buying my standard line, that Baltimore doesn't have any one place that stands out above the others but you can get excellent seafood at any good restaurant in the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | November 11, 2010
Like a lot of taverns in the Baltimore area, the Yellow Dog Tavern in Canton has a lively first floor dominated by the bar and a quieter second floor filled with tables and chairs. When my wife and I showed up there for dinner on a recent weeknight, we picked the upstairs dining area. It is a lovely space, with windows looking out on neighborhood rowhouses. Framed photos of dogs owned by staff members serve as decoration, along with paintings hanging on the brick walls. While almost every seat was taken downstairs, we had plenty of privacy upstairs.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | July 1, 2010
Tangier's is an oasis. It's a new restaurant in Canton offering flavorful Moroccan dishes in a tasteful setting. The soothing orange and brown walls, dark tile table tops — this space was formerly Meridian 54 and, before that, Red Fish — combine to take you away from the hot summer clime of Baltimore into a cool, sheltered spot. The food, traditional Moroccan dishes drawn from the recipes of relatives of chef Alan Suissa, is exceptional. Dine here, and you're not in Canton anymore.
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