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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 8, 2001
PATERSON, N.J. - Three New Jersey legislators have proposed the creation of a national park at Great Falls, Paterson's landmark and a major manufacturing center after the Revolutionary War. The lawmakers - Rep. Bill Pascrell Jr., Sen. Robert Torricelli and Sen. Jon Corzine - said federal park money could speed restoration of old factories that decades ago hummed with the production of silk fabrics, locomotives and Colt revolvers. The Interior Department declared the Great Falls and about 118 acres around it a national historic landmark in 1976.
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NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
A multi-agency, multi-day search for a Potomac River kayaker was called off on Sunday after it was determined he had simply ditched his kayak and gone home — "oblivious" to the fact that authorities became alarmed after finding his kayak floating upside down. The Montgomery County Police Department first requested the public's help on Friday in identifying the owner of the abandoned kayak, which was near the Anglers Inn boat ramp south of Great Falls. Earlier in the day, witnesses at the Great Falls observation deck had reported seeing a man in the kayak, and told police that it had "appeared that he may have needed assistance.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Donna M. Owens and Donna M. Owens,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 16, 2004
The Great Falls of the Potomac may not have the instant name recognition of, say, Niagara Falls. But each year, about 3 million people visit this series of rapids and cascades along the Potomac River, where the rushing water and varied topography make for a beautiful outdoor canvas. "It's very picturesque and scenic, like Yosemite, the Grand Canyon or Yellowstone," says Bill Line, a spokesman for the National Park Service, which oversees some 388 parks across America. "Most people don't realize it, but [this area]
SPORTS
From Sun staff reports | May 18, 2014
The Maryland Natural Resources Police has issued a warning to boaters and anglers to avoid the Upper Potomac River, including its swollen creeks and streams, through Monday. The advisory, issued Friday and based on information received from the National Weather Service and the Maryland Emergency Management Agency, covers the river from Cumberland to Great Falls. It could be extended Monday afternoon, if necessary. The water levels pose a threat to non white-water vessels, tubers, anglers and other recreational users and are caused by wave action, water velocity and treacherous currents.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Sheila Dresser and Michael Dresser and Sheila Dresser,SUN STAFF | October 13, 1997
GREAT FALLS, Mont. -- Before Capt. Meriwether Lewis saw the Great Falls of the Missouri on June 13, 1805, he heard the roar.What he beheld when he reached the tiny island at the base of the falls astonished him. Here the mighty Missouri River, some 1,500 feet wide and swollen with the snowmelt of the Rockies, fell 78 feet. It was, he wrote in his journal, a "sublimely grand specticle the grandest sight I ever beheld." It was also a crucial moment in the journey, the discovery that dispelled any fear that Lewis and William Clark had taken a wrong turn in their expedition.
BUSINESS
April 19, 2008
Acquisitions Saul Centers Inc., a Bethesda-based real estate investment trust, acquired three shopping centers: Great Falls Center in Great Falls, Va.; BJ's Wholesale Club in Alexandria, Va.; and the Marketplace at Sea Colony in Bethany Beach, Del. Contracts Euro RSCG Baltimore has received a marketing assignment from Brainware Inc. Expansion Linthicum-based Dialysis Corp. of America is developing its 11th Pennsylvania location in Camp Hill. Openings BlueRidge Bank opened for business at 18 W. Patrick St. in Frederick.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | June 15, 2014
A multi-agency, multi-day search for a Potomac River kayaker was called off on Sunday after it was determined he had simply ditched his kayak and gone home — "oblivious" to the fact that authorities became alarmed after finding his kayak floating upside down. The Montgomery County Police Department first requested the public's help on Friday in identifying the owner of the abandoned kayak, which was near the Anglers Inn boat ramp south of Great Falls. Earlier in the day, witnesses at the Great Falls observation deck had reported seeing a man in the kayak, and told police that it had "appeared that he may have needed assistance.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
An Odenton man who drowned in the Potomac River on Labor Day has been identified, Montgomery County police said. Mark Moore, 22, was identified by police on Friday. Search crews were called on Monday night for a possible drowning at the to Potomac River near the Great Falls overlook, police said. Montgomery County Fire Rescue recovered the body in the water on Thursday. Moore was pronounced dead at the scene. Police said he had been sitting in the water near the shore with friends when he decided to wade farther into the river when he was swept downriver.
EXPLORE
December 1, 2011
Send sports notices a minimum of two weeks before the requested publication date to Patuxent Publishing/MS Sports Notices, Third floor, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, MD 21278; e-mail tworgo@patuxent.com . Include date, time, location, contact information and subsection. Competitive Kelly Post girls lacrosse registration opens for returning players Dec. 1 on first-come, first-serve basis. Open registration for new players begins Dec. 15. Registration closes when teams are full or on Jan. 31. http://www.leaguelineup.com/welcome.asp?
NEWS
January 2, 1995
H. Lance Barclay, 51, the National Geographic Society's vic president for human resources in Washington, died of a heart attack Friday at his home at Great Falls, Va. Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Barclay, had a career of more than 20 years in personnel and employee relations in Pennsylvania, New York and Florida and had worked for the society since 1991. He was also the board chairman of the Greater Washington Boys and Girls Clubs and a board member of the American Field Service. He is survived by his wife, Barbara; and two daughters, Tamara, 28 and Heather, 22, all of Great Falls; his mother, Louise Quick Barclay of Baltimore; and two sisters, Jacqueline Chamber of Baltimore and Dolores Barclay of New York City.
SPORTS
By Mike Klingaman and The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2013
Running a half-marathon is easy, Bob Gralley, 87, said: "I put one leg in front of the other. " For 13.1 miles. That Gralley can do this at his age is remarkable. Yet on Saturday, there he'll be at the 13th Baltimore Running Festival, a silver-haired methuselah plugging along beside others young enough to be his great-grandchildren. Not that they'd know it. Trim and limber, Gralley doesn't look his age, though race officials said the Parkville resident is the oldest participant entered in any of the day's events.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 19, 2013
Kathryn D. Brunelle, a flight attendant who was also chief financial officer of her husband's company, died Monday of a stroke at the University of Maryland Medical Center. The Ellicott City resident was 44. The daughter of a career Air Force officer and a homemaker, Kathryn Diane Murphy was born in Wichita, Kan., and raised in Turkey and Texas. She graduated in 1986 from a high school on the Lajes Air Base in the Azores. Mrs. Brunelle earned an associate's degree from Howard Community College.
NEWS
By Jessica Anderson, The Baltimore Sun | September 7, 2013
An Odenton man who drowned in the Potomac River on Labor Day has been identified, Montgomery County police said. Mark Moore, 22, was identified by police on Friday. Search crews were called on Monday night for a possible drowning at the to Potomac River near the Great Falls overlook, police said. Montgomery County Fire Rescue recovered the body in the water on Thursday. Moore was pronounced dead at the scene. Police said he had been sitting in the water near the shore with friends when he decided to wade farther into the river when he was swept downriver.
SPORTS
By Ian Duncan and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2013
Race cars whipped around downtown Baltimore on Saturday, turning usually traffic-choked streets into a speedway, their engines filling the air with the sounds of a hornet's hum on the straights and a smoker's cackle at the hairpin turn. As the cars negotiated the two mile course's first turn from Pratt Street onto Light Street during morning warm-ups, spectators lounged in the grandstands or pressed against the barriers, many with cameras in hand trying to freeze the action in a snapshot.
SPORTS
By Jordan Littman, The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2013
Perhaps it was the fact that Bethesda swimmer Katie Ledecky thrives on pulling away early thanks to fast starts. Or maybe it was that Denmark's Lotte Friis chose to challenge her, even outpace her at times, in the women's 1,500-meter freestyle on the third night at the FINA World Championships in Barcelona, Spain. But when it was all said and done at Palau Sant Jordi, Ledecky not only sped away after 1,300 meters of racing to take the world title by 2.35 seconds, but in the process, she did it in 15 minutes, 36.53 seconds.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2013
James H. Eacker, a retired Rouse Co. executive who was active in environmental issues, died June 8 of heart failure at Howard County General Hospital. He was 79. The son of the former president of Boston Gas & Electric Co. and a homemaker, he was born and raised in Cambridge, Mass. After graduating from Deerfield Academy, he earned a bachelor's degree in 1955 in business and engineering management from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He earned a master's degree in business, also from MIT, in 1958.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,SUN STAFF | April 3, 1997
For the first time in more than a year, the waters of the Potomac River fill the C&O Canal in Great Falls and Washington.Like filling a bathtub, workers this week are letting the river flow into the dry ditch in preparation for today's launch of the Canal Clipper, the mule-drawn passenger barge at Great Falls.Twice last year, the 184-mile C&O Canal National Historical Park was raked by flood runoff: first from January's blizzard, then in September when Tropical Storm Fran swept through.The receding waters tore holes in the earthen canal walls and allowed the water to drain into the Potomac River below.
NEWS
By Greg Tasker and Greg Tasker,Sun Staff Writer | May 28, 1995
GREAT FALLS -- Two women in wet suits and helmets slip into long, narrow boats and side by side sweep forward into the slow-moving current. They paddle their red and blue kayaks upstream toward a spectacular gorge and the famous falls that lure thousands of sightseers to the Potomac River here every year.For the moment, it is surprisingly quiet here, two miles and a couple of bends downstream from the roar of Great Falls, where whitewaterers rush over jagged ledges, cascading through rugged "chutes" into Mather Gorge.
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