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Great Escape

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By PETER SCHMUCK | September 4, 2005
THE ODDSMAKERS said it would be a mismatch, but it came down to a missed tackle. Maryland tailback Lance Ball yanked his foot through the fleeting grasp of Navy cornerback Greg Thrasher and broke a second tackle to keep a last-ditch drive alive and turn a major Division I-A upset into a great escape for the heavily favored Terrapins last night at M&T Bank Stadium. Right up to that moment, Maryland coach Ralph Friedgen had to be figuring that it would be another 40 years before he agreed to start another season against the Midshipman, who have made a habit of turning the oddsmakers on their ears during the Paul Johnson era. Moral victory?
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
"Toy Story 3" is a prison break movie — and prison break movies have always juggled laughs and jolts. A Newsweek writer has raised the question of whether "Toy Story 3" is too frightful for small children. But children have always loved to be scared, whether by reading fairy tales or watching "The Wizard of Oz." As screenwriter Michael Arndt says, "There's nothing wrong with strong emotions — you go to a film to feel strong emotions. And the only time that doesn't work is if the emotions are cheaply earned or are made gratuitously.
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NEWS
March 31, 1993
Jerry Sage, 75, the World War II prisoner of war portrayed by Steve McQueen in the movie "The Great Escape," died Friday of cancer at a Dothan, Ala., hospital. During his captivity in a German POW camp, Mr. Sage helped work for 15 months on the huge, three-tunnel escape project that formed the plot for the movie and his book, "Sage."
NEWS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | May 13, 2009
If there were ever a time that we all needed a great escape - this would be it. But, you may be thinking, this is also the time when we can least afford to get away. Spending a few days at the beach doesn't have to break the bank. Waterfront hotels, restaurants and attractions are slathering on the deals and discounts as thickly as they can, especially on the Internet. We found fun, free and nearly free activities and events at popular beach destinations along the Mid-Atlantic coastline, from North Carolina to New Jersey.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and By Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 25, 2003
When the World War II POW adventure The Great Escape opened 40 years ago this summer, the title was controversial among my schoolyard pals. "You call that a great escape? Fifty guys get killed and only three escape and the rest return to the POW camp." Once we saw the picture, there was no argument -- without even trying, it taught us all a lesson about purpose and sacrifice. Ever since the film became a hit, the phrase "great escape" has been easy to find, whether in travel sections or feature stories about jailbreaks, rescues or Houdini-like feats.
NEWS
February 2, 2008
BERTRAM JAMES, 92 Made "Great Escape" Bertram "Jimmy" James, one of the few British prisoners to avoid being executed for joining in the "great escape" from a German prison camp in World War II, died Jan. 18 at Royal Shrewsbury Hospital in central England after a brief illness. Mr. James was a pilot on a Wellington bomber that was shot down near Rotterdam in the Netherlands on June 5, 1940. He was captured the next day. Attempting to escape, he once remarked, "was our contribution to the war effort."
NEWS
August 11, 1999
John Dortch "Booty" Lewis Sr.,84, a Goldsboro, N.C., insurance executive whose World War II exploits were chronicled in part in the movie "The Great Escape," died Sunday in Goldsboro of pancreatic cancer.He spent almost two years in Germany's Stalag Luft III. That was the prison camp from which prisoners of war tunneled to freedom in an escape later to be made into "The Great Escape," starring Steve McQueen. Many of the exploits portrayed by Mr. McQueen were based on escape attempts and other activities by Mr. Lewis.
NEWS
April 26, 1991
Paul Brickhill, 74, author of "The Great Escape" and othe best-selling war novels that sold millions of copies and were made into films, died Tuesday in Sydney, Australia. Mr. Brickhill was a journalist on the Sun newspaper in Sydney before joining the Royal Australian Air Force. He trained as a fighter pilot in Canada, flew with a squadron in England and was shot down over the Tunisian desert in 1943. He spent the rest of the war in Stalag Luft 111, the prisoner-of-war camp that was the setting of his book "The Great Escape," written in 1949.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2010
"Toy Story 3" is a prison break movie — and prison break movies have always juggled laughs and jolts. A Newsweek writer has raised the question of whether "Toy Story 3" is too frightful for small children. But children have always loved to be scared, whether by reading fairy tales or watching "The Wizard of Oz." As screenwriter Michael Arndt says, "There's nothing wrong with strong emotions — you go to a film to feel strong emotions. And the only time that doesn't work is if the emotions are cheaply earned or are made gratuitously.
NEWS
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman | May 13, 2009
If there were ever a time that we all needed a great escape - this would be it. But, you may be thinking, this is also the time when we can least afford to get away. Spending a few days at the beach doesn't have to break the bank. Waterfront hotels, restaurants and attractions are slathering on the deals and discounts as thickly as they can, especially on the Internet. We found fun, free and nearly free activities and events at popular beach destinations along the Mid-Atlantic coastline, from North Carolina to New Jersey.
SPORTS
By CHILDS WALKER and CHILDS WALKER,SUN REPORTER | May 2, 2008
When wrestler Chris Benoit murdered his wife and son and hanged himself last summer, some wondered if his former employer, World Wrestling Entertainment, would face congressional scrutiny or even financial peril. Dozens of Benoit's peers, including several WWE headliners, had already died young, with many of their passings linked to steroid abuse, painkiller addiction and other stresses associated with grueling travel and performance schedules. But the grisly Benoit episode, with its ties to steroids, concussions and other hot-button issues, dragged the WWE into mainstream headlines like never before.
NEWS
February 2, 2008
BERTRAM JAMES, 92 Made "Great Escape" Bertram "Jimmy" James, one of the few British prisoners to avoid being executed for joining in the "great escape" from a German prison camp in World War II, died Jan. 18 at Royal Shrewsbury Hospital in central England after a brief illness. Mr. James was a pilot on a Wellington bomber that was shot down near Rotterdam in the Netherlands on June 5, 1940. He was captured the next day. Attempting to escape, he once remarked, "was our contribution to the war effort."
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | February 28, 2007
There was a time in vodka's history that its creators added flavor to cover up its rough spots. Nowadays, flavors are added to smooth vodkas to capture market share, create buzz and add a few dollars to the purchase price. An up-to-date menu of vodkas reads like one found at a juice bar. There are pear, pomegranate, pineapple, green apple, grapefruit, raspberry and lemon offerings. There are vodkas that taste or at least smell like dessert. Finally, there are the marriages made in caffeine: espresso and double-espresso vodkas.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | December 6, 2006
Gwen Stefani so wants to be the new Madonna. She wants to be more musically audacious than the original Material Girl. But the former No Doubt focal point has neither the smarts nor the charisma to pull it off. On The Sweet Escape, Stefani's second solo album, her forced, fashion-obsessed club-queen persona is more superficial than the one presented on Love. Angel. Music. Baby., her multiplatinum 2004 debut. Where the first album's quirkiness felt inspired and even fun at times, the new CD -- out this week -- is too self-conscious and frustratingly uneven.
FEATURES
By ANNIE ADDINGTON and ANNIE ADDINGTON,MCCLATCHY-TRIBUNE | July 15, 2006
As a child, Gary Hatley had always dreamed of having a treehouse in his backyard to escape to and play out his adventure fantasies with his friends. As a father in his early 40s, he found that the fever had never quite died. When his son, Jack, was 4 or 5 years old, Hatley, who lives in Columbus, Ga., drew a sketch of a treehouse - a small, cabinlike structure featuring a big backyard oak climbing through its center. Jack was enamored with the drawing. "He just loved the idea," said Hatley, now 50 and the owner of a landscaping-management business.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 4, 2005
THE ODDSMAKERS said it would be a mismatch, but it came down to a missed tackle. Maryland tailback Lance Ball yanked his foot through the fleeting grasp of Navy cornerback Greg Thrasher and broke a second tackle to keep a last-ditch drive alive and turn a major Division I-A upset into a great escape for the heavily favored Terrapins last night at M&T Bank Stadium. Right up to that moment, Maryland coach Ralph Friedgen had to be figuring that it would be another 40 years before he agreed to start another season against the Midshipman, who have made a habit of turning the oddsmakers on their ears during the Paul Johnson era. Moral victory?
SPORTS
By Roch Kubatko and Roch Kubatko,SUN STAFF | April 2, 2002
His sprint to the dugout yesterday after the first inning completed the great escape. Three walks, a stolen base and a throwing error by his catcher would equate to only one run - the last given up by Orioles starter Scott Erickson. Great escape, indeed. Though he wasn't particularly sharp, Erickson punctured the New York Yankees' hopes of beginning the 2002 season with a win. He gutted out six innings in his first major-league appearance in 21 months and gladly accepted the generous run support provided by Tony Batista's grand slam and Melvin Mora's bases-loaded double in the Orioles' 10-3 victory.
NEWS
By THOMAS N. LONGSTRETH | November 25, 1994
No one who ever saw him play will believe it, but Joe DiMaggio turns 80 today.Years ago, when the ravages of the Great Depression threatened faith in our economic system and our very way of life, a young ballplayer appeared, as if on cue, publicly to act out the old rags-to-riches myth that is at the heart of the American Dream.The eighth of nine children of poor Sicilian immigrant parents, Joe DiMaggio became a New York Yankee star at 21, led his team to nine World Series championships, made (for his day)
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