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By From Staff Reports | August 1, 1994
OOLTEWAH, Tenn. -- Janice Moodie of Scotland won the final hole yesterday to clinch a 9-9 tie with the United States, allowing the Great Britain-Ireland team to retain the Curtis Cup.Moodie defeated Carol Semple Thompson on the 18th green of the final match, 2 up, and earned the visitors the third tie in the history of the event that dates to 1932, and the first since 1958. The U.S. leads the series, 20-5-3.By virtue of the draw, Great Britain-Ireland retains the title it won in 1992 for another two years.
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NEWS
September 4, 2014
World events over the last month or so have proven that we do have a very creditable terrorist threat, not only to the Middle East, but to Europe and the U.S. As this is the start of the NFL season and all the fantasy leagues are in full force, I would like to recommend a World Leader Fantasy League. As we already have a World Leader team in place, I propose trading our current world leader, President Barack Obama, for Great Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron. Last week demonstrated that Mr. Obama is not up to the task.
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FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | September 29, 1994
London--In the Victorian conservatory of The Old House at Shepperton Studios, Paul Olliver does a little pirouette and says: "Mr. Stallone? He's wonderful."The cherubic, well-coiffed Mr. Olliver, studio manager at Shepperton, has good reason to dance for joy. Mr. Sylvester Stallone is filming his $60 million seriocomic super-hero epic "Judge Dredd" at Shepperton.About half the budget is being spent in Britain and lots of it is coming to Shepperton Studios. Half a dozen of Shepperton's 17 enormous sound stages and even a parking lot are taken up with sets for "Judge Dredd's" post-post-post-modern Mega-City One opus.
NEWS
July 4, 2014
Within months of the first shots of what was to become America's Revolutionary War, Maryland mustered troops to join the Continental Army and help newly appointed general George Washington drive the British from Boston. But the willingness to support the armed struggle did not correspond with an inclination toward independence. As was the case generally throughout the colonies in 1775, Maryland's leaders remained steadfast in their hope for a redress of grievances with Great Britain and a peaceable reunion with the crown.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Prepare for the British Invasion. This one, however, will be of the floral, not musical, variety. The nearly 200-year-old Philadelphia Flower Show runs March 2-10 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. This year's theme is "Brilliant!" with exhibits focusing on the landscapes, culture and beauty of Great Britain. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society , which sponsors the event, has teamed up with Britain's Royal Horticultural Society to bring British designers, experts and presentations to the show, including Mark Lane, the head gardener for Buckingham Palace.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 10, 1997
Jawaharlal Nehru, India's first prime minister, began his speech a few moments before midnight. It was Aug. 14, 1947. India was about to become independent from Great Britain, and Pakistan was about to be born. Lord Mountbatten, the last British viceroy, would formally relinquish his office in the morning."At the stroke of the midnight hour, when the world sleeps, India will awake to life and freedom," Nehru told his country by radio. "A moment comes but rarely in history, when we step out from the old to the new, when an age ends, and when the soul of a nation, long suppressed, finds utterance.
NEWS
July 4, 2014
Within months of the first shots of what was to become America's Revolutionary War, Maryland mustered troops to join the Continental Army and help newly appointed general George Washington drive the British from Boston. But the willingness to support the armed struggle did not correspond with an inclination toward independence. As was the case generally throughout the colonies in 1775, Maryland's leaders remained steadfast in their hope for a redress of grievances with Great Britain and a peaceable reunion with the crown.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | March 21, 1996
"Carousel" - a musical about the circularity of life has come full circle itself.Based on a 1909 European play, "Liliom" by Ferenc Molnar, it was musicalized and thoroughly Americanized in 1945 by Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II, who transported it from its Hungarian setting to the Maine coast.Now, the Europeans have made it their own again, as proved by the Royal National Theatre of Great Britain's splendid Tony Award-winning production at the Lyric Opera House through Sunday.The visual elements are the core of this beautifully realized revival.
NEWS
August 13, 2006
"We are confident that we have stopped an attempt to create mass murder on an unimaginable scale" Paul Stephenson Stephenson, London's deputy metropolitan police commissioner, was commenting on the arrest of 21 alleged terrorists accused of plotting to blow up as many as nine U.S.-flag airliners while flying from Great Britain to the United States.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington of the Ann Arrundell County Historical Society | November 21, 1993
75 Years Ago* Yesterday, "Great Britain Day" was observed at the First Methodist Episcopal Church in Annapolis with the Rev. H. W. Burgan giving a lecture on "Our Obligation to Great Britain." On Dec. 13, a similar observance will be held in the House of Delegates with Judge Robert Moss presiding. -- The Sun, Dec. 9, 1918.* Postmaster T. J. Linthicum and staff in Annapolis have been swamped with Christmas mail with critical staff out with the flu. Motor Route A has been without mail since Friday.
NEWS
April 16, 2013
While the mainstream media in America love to wax poetic about former British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, the sainted "Iron Lady" of the Cold War, it might be wise to remember the real person behind the carefully polished myth ("Margaret Thatcher made history by standing firm," April 11). Let's not forget that while she often played up her "blue collar" roots, her sudden rise to fame and fortune was actually bankrolled by her husband Dennis, a millionaire businessman, and that her economic policies resulted in the disappearance of countless small businesses and their replacement by mega-corporations like Walmart.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2013
Former British Prime Minister Tony Blair told a Baltimore audience Tuesday night that the world's challenges have never been greater, nor come with such speed, and he advocated intervention in struggling countries by powers such as Great Britain and the United States. "I don't think there's been a more difficult time to be a political leader than now," Blair, who left office in 2007, told an audience of 2,800 at Loyola University Maryland. He described challenges posed by globalization and ever-evolving technology and said that "often the best short-term politics is in collision with the best long-term policy.
TRAVEL
By Michelle Deal-Zimmerman, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2013
Prepare for the British Invasion. This one, however, will be of the floral, not musical, variety. The nearly 200-year-old Philadelphia Flower Show runs March 2-10 at the Pennsylvania Convention Center. This year's theme is "Brilliant!" with exhibits focusing on the landscapes, culture and beauty of Great Britain. The Pennsylvania Horticultural Society , which sponsors the event, has teamed up with Britain's Royal Horticultural Society to bring British designers, experts and presentations to the show, including Mark Lane, the head gardener for Buckingham Palace.
SPORTS
Sports on TV | July 19, 2012
THURSDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS MLB Mets@Washington (T) MASN9 a.m. Mets@Washington MASN12:30 Orioles@Minnesota MASN21 Orioles@Minnesota (T) MASN7 White Sox@Boston MLB7 Mets@Washington (T) MASN11:30 Basketball United States vs. Great Britain ESPN22 United States vs. Great Britain (T) NBA12:30 a.m. NBA Summer Lg.: Milwaukee vs. Wash. (T) NBANoon Summer Lg.: New York vs. Toronto NBA4 Summer Lg.: Boston vs. Sacra.
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV, The Baltimore Sun | July 18, 2012
As nations battle it out for sports supremacy at the Olympics in London this summer, we can all acknowledge that when it comes to fashion, the Brits have us beat. Vivienne Westwood, Victoria Beckham, Burberry, Kate Moss, Kate Middleton, Twiggy, the late Princess Diana and Alexander McQueen ... what is it about the British that allows them to excel at clothing design and setting standards? It starts with their willingness to try new colors and styles, according to Felicia Peele, head of Fashionably Young, a nonprofit fashion image consultant in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2011
When John Robert Skelton got caught last summer stealing the identity of a deceased aide to a United States senator, federal authorities called the crime "despicable," and a spokesman for U.S. Customs said the agency was pleased to end the charade. But the suspect's lawyer calls his client's actions more tragic than criminal. He needed medical care to treat HIV that only doctors in America could provide, the attorney said, adding that Skelton did not use his false name to profit from the victim in any way. Instead of pleading guilty to aggravated identity theft, which would have required the judge to imprison the 41-year-old for a minimum two years, prosecutors allowed him to admit to the lesser crime of making a false claim of American citizenship.
SPORTS
Sports on TV | July 19, 2012
THURSDAY'S TELEVISION HIGHLIGHTS MLB Mets@Washington (T) MASN9 a.m. Mets@Washington MASN12:30 Orioles@Minnesota MASN21 Orioles@Minnesota (T) MASN7 White Sox@Boston MLB7 Mets@Washington (T) MASN11:30 Basketball United States vs. Great Britain ESPN22 United States vs. Great Britain (T) NBA12:30 a.m. NBA Summer Lg.: Milwaukee vs. Wash. (T) NBANoon Summer Lg.: New York vs. Toronto NBA4 Summer Lg.: Boston vs. Sacra.
FEATURES
By FRED RASMUSSEN | December 15, 1991
From The Sun Dec. 15-21, 1841DEC. 18: The snow storm yesterday caused a detention of the mails in all directions, but we believe all due, except from the South, arrived during the day, though several hours behind their time.DEC. 20: CURE YOUR COLDS. We received from the proprietor, No. 100 Howard Street, a package of "Maurer's Cough Candy," which is very pleasant to the taste and highly recommended as avaluable cure for colds and coughs.From The Sun Dec. 15-21, 1891DEC. 19: Mr. Charles L. Carson, one of Baltimore's most widely-known architects, died at his home, 1725 Madison Avenue, at 2:30 yesterday morning, from a complication of diseases.
NEWS
July 4, 2009
In the summer of 1776, more than a year after the start of the Revolutionary War, Maryland was among the last holdouts among the 13 colonies in authorizing a declaration of independence from Great Britain. The colony's major landholders, who dominated political affairs, were reluctant to take that step, but tradespeople, merchants and common citizens became increasingly convinced that reconciliation with England was impossible and agitated for a formal separation. The state's convention finally agreed to support independence on June 28, but communications in those days were slow.
SPORTS
By FROM SUN NEWS SERVICES | November 3, 2008
Radcliffe runs down NYC Marathon title No. 3 running Paula Radcliffe defended her title at the New York City Marathon yesterday to become the second woman to win the race three times. Marilson Gomes dos Santos of Brazil won the men's race for the second time in three years, passing Abderrahim Goumri of Morocco with about a mile left. Unlike Radcliffe's tight victories in 2004 and 2007, the world-record holder from Great Britain pulled away from Ludmila Petrova in the 22nd mile to win comfortably in 2 hours, 23 minutes, 56 seconds.
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