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NEWS
December 30, 1994
A protected great blue heron died after being shot in the neck near Liberty Reservoir.The heron was shot in the neck Wednesday while wading near the reservoir. It was brought to veterinarian Thomas Ryan by a fisherman who found it.Mr. Ryan, who said he could not save the bird, said he believed the gunshot came from a small-caliber or pellet gun.Killing a blue heron is a violation of federal law. Offenders may be fined up to $5,000 and sentenced to 6 months in prison. The herons are protected under the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act.If caught, the perpetrators could face state and federal penalties, said Bob Graham, a spokesman for the Department of Natural Resources.
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NEWS
Dan Rodricks | November 24, 2011
Certainly, the Piscataway must have been among the Native Americans who understood The Way of the Heron. They lived along the shores, too. They inhabited land at the edges of the Chesapeake in what became Southern Maryland. They must have noticed how the great blue heron, stalking fish in the marshes, got along with other birds - even the teasing red-winged blackbird - and from that observation came a whole feast of philosophy about the peaceful life. The Way of the Heron, Evan Pritchard says, is an ancient Algonquin teaching, and he knows it well enough that he can share its timeless wisdom easily with those who are open to it. Mr. Pritchard, a descendant of Algonquin-speaking people, is the director of the Center for Algonquin Culture in New York, a professor of Native American history at Marist College, a teacher of philosophy and ethics, and the author of several books, including, "Native American Stories of the Sacred" and "No Word For Time, The Way of the Algonquin People.
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NEWS
By Gilbert Byron | April 4, 1991
Gilbert Byron speaks in the present tense of Old House Cove on the Chesapeake near St. Michaels. He lived alone in a cabin there for many years and filed numerous dispatches to Other Voices. This year, illness and blindness have forced him to an Easton nursing home, where he dictated this article.I THINK it is fitting that this year the great blue heron, a true Chesapeake treasure, is gracing a special Maryland license plate to raise money for bay cleanup efforts.In my youth, we didn't call this magnificent bird a great blue heron; we called it a crane.
SPORTS
April 25, 2010
Today Spring Swift Watch with the Baltimore Bird Club, 7:30 p.m., Druid Hill Park Conservatory, Auchentoroly Terrace and Gwynns Falls Parkway. Chance to see thousands of chimney swifts during their annual migration north from the Amazon basin of Peru as they stop in Baltimore to roost at dusk. Binoculars helpful. Details: 410-467-5352 or jafjsc@verizon.net. BIRDING Tuesday: Follow the spring migration with a walk at Cromwell Valley Park, 8:30 a.m., with the Baltimore Bird Club.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
As a volunteer cleanup crew in Finksburg disposed of the last of 20 trash bags of litter collected along Route 91 near Route 140, something rustled and squawked in a clump of tall grass. Volunteer Neil Ridgely followed the sound and found an injured great blue heron, the long-legged avian whose likeness adorns many Maryland license plates. Herons grow several feet tall, with feathers accounting for most of their weight. They are graceful, skittish and decidedly unfriendly. This bird threatened its prospective rescuers with its foot-long beak.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2002
Howard County Fire and Rescue Services responded in full force to a distress call Wednesday night - a great blue heron was dangling 60 feet above ground from a tree near the Little Patuxent River in Savage. The assembled rescuers - two fire engines, a ladder truck and 14 firefighters from volunteer and career companies - required about 30 minutes to untangle the injured young male from what appeared to be kite string or fishing line. Two firefighters in an aerial ladder basket wrapped the heron - a protected species - in a blanket and carefully cut away the line before taking him to the Savage fire station to await assistance from a wildlife rescue group.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | April 16, 1992
Maryland is selling its 350,000th Chesapeake Bay license plate today, a watershed event for what officials claim is the most successful environmental program of its kind in the nation.Since January 1991, the Motor Vehicle Administration has marketed the Chesapeake Bay commemorative tags for $20 each. Limited edition plates, which feature the letters "BAY" or use popular numbers like "001," cost more.The tags have raised $3.5 million for the Chesapeake Bay Trust, a non-profit, state-managed organization that awards grants for environmental cleanup, research and educational programs in Maryland.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 30, 1999
A GREAT BLUE HERON flying against the sun casts a pterodactyl shadow and, if you've ever canoed the Susquehanna River or Deer Creek, the shadow suddenly on the water can give you a start, whiplash if you look up too quickly. The only thing more startling is the heron's cry -- a supernatural shriek from the backwaters of time.I heard that cry for the first time while prospecting for trout in the Big Gunpowder Falls in Sparks, northern Baltimore County.I'd seen heron hundreds of times -- perched in rows, formal as sitting judges, on rocks in the Susquehanna; standing still and primed for spearfishing on the banks of Deer Creek and at a place I call Father's Day Pond -- but I'd never heard one shriek.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1997
Careful when entering the lobby of George Fox Middle School in Pasadena not to step into the marsh or bump into the great blue heron.Well, it's not a real marsh or live bird -- but a mural a group of George Fox Middle School students will finish painting today at the school's entrance.Eighth-grader Angela Thompson, 13, won a schoolwide competition for the best design to fill one of the school's walls and, with the help of an artist-in-residence and almost two dozen of her schoolmates, she helped turn her sketch into a larger-than-life mural.
NEWS
By Katherine Richards and Katherine Richards,Staff Writer | October 18, 1993
Carol Bentz of Manchester battled the bureaucracy and won.And North Carroll High School in Hampstead will soon have a stuffed great blue heron to prove it."It was horrendous, but he's my bird," she said, after obtaining permits from Minnesota to Massachusetts to allow the preservation of "Steve," a great blue heron that died near her summer home on the Platte River in Michigan.Mrs. Bentz spent days on the phone, negotiating a maze of state and federal bureaucracies that might have blocked a less determined person.
NEWS
By Julie Bykowicz and Julie Bykowicz,SUN STAFF | April 26, 2002
Howard County Fire and Rescue Services responded in full force to a distress call Wednesday night - a great blue heron was dangling 60 feet above ground from a tree near the Little Patuxent River in Savage. The assembled rescuers - two fire engines, a ladder truck and 14 firefighters from volunteer and career companies - required about 30 minutes to untangle the injured young male from what appeared to be kite string or fishing line. Two firefighters in an aerial ladder basket wrapped the heron - a protected species - in a blanket and carefully cut away the line before taking him to the Savage fire station to await assistance from a wildlife rescue group.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | July 19, 2001
As a volunteer cleanup crew in Finksburg disposed of the last of 20 trash bags of litter collected along Route 91 near Route 140, something rustled and squawked in a clump of tall grass. Volunteer Neil Ridgely followed the sound and found an injured great blue heron, the long-legged avian whose likeness adorns many Maryland license plates. Herons grow several feet tall, with feathers accounting for most of their weight. They are graceful, skittish and decidedly unfriendly. This bird threatened its prospective rescuers with its foot-long beak.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | July 30, 1999
A GREAT BLUE HERON flying against the sun casts a pterodactyl shadow and, if you've ever canoed the Susquehanna River or Deer Creek, the shadow suddenly on the water can give you a start, whiplash if you look up too quickly. The only thing more startling is the heron's cry -- a supernatural shriek from the backwaters of time.I heard that cry for the first time while prospecting for trout in the Big Gunpowder Falls in Sparks, northern Baltimore County.I'd seen heron hundreds of times -- perched in rows, formal as sitting judges, on rocks in the Susquehanna; standing still and primed for spearfishing on the banks of Deer Creek and at a place I call Father's Day Pond -- but I'd never heard one shriek.
NEWS
By Tom Horton and Tom Horton,SUN STAFF | February 5, 1999
IT'S MIDNIGHT, mid-January, cold and clear and calm. The river's a clean slate, mine alone to essay upon.The kayak comes alive as it slips from a little beach in the shadow of trucks whizzing over the U.S. 50 bridge in downtown Salisbury.Soon the city's sodium vapor lights and industrial waterfront give way to starlight, and the homes of the Wicomico's wealthy, unaware they are being watched tonight.I couldn't sleep. This is better than Letterman. I'm heading downriver. Tide's starting to flood up from the bay. When I turn back in an hour or so, it will boost me home.
NEWS
By Elaine Tassy and Elaine Tassy,SUN STAFF | February 28, 1997
Careful when entering the lobby of George Fox Middle School in Pasadena not to step into the marsh or bump into the great blue heron.Well, it's not a real marsh or live bird -- but a mural a group of George Fox Middle School students will finish painting today at the school's entrance.Eighth-grader Angela Thompson, 13, won a schoolwide competition for the best design to fill one of the school's walls and, with the help of an artist-in-residence and almost two dozen of her schoolmates, she helped turn her sketch into a larger-than-life mural.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON and TOM HORTON,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1995
A BRILLIANT scientist once told me if we could learn to communicate with dolphins and the great whales, this would be his first question:With such big, active, highly developed brains, which they have had for tens of millions of years -- compared with humans' hundreds of thousands -- how did they learn to survive peaceably, among themselves and with their environment?A good question, but here is what I would ask:How do they pass the time: And how does time pass for them?I know how they do not pass time:Not in traffic jams and theme park queues; nor leashed to faxes and pagers and e-mail and answering machines; nor navigating airports and scheming to buy larger houses, and spending days choosing among 55 different boom boxes for a teen-ager's birthday.
NEWS
By TOM HORTON and TOM HORTON,SUN STAFF | October 6, 1995
A BRILLIANT scientist once told me if we could learn to communicate with dolphins and the great whales, this would be his first question:With such big, active, highly developed brains, which they have had for tens of millions of years -- compared with humans' hundreds of thousands -- how did they learn to survive peaceably, among themselves and with their environment?A good question, but here is what I would ask:How do they pass the time: And how does time pass for them?I know how they do not pass time:Not in traffic jams and theme park queues; nor leashed to faxes and pagers and e-mail and answering machines; nor navigating airports and scheming to buy larger houses, and spending days choosing among 55 different boom boxes for a teen-ager's birthday.
NEWS
December 30, 1994
A protected great blue heron died after being shot in the neck near Liberty Reservoir.The heron was shot in the neck Wednesday while wading near the reservoir. It was brought to veterinarian Thomas Ryan by a fisherman who found it.Mr. Ryan, who said he could not save the bird, said he believed the gunshot came from a small-caliber or pellet gun.Killing a blue heron is a violation of federal law. Offenders may be fined up to $5,000 and sentenced to 6 months in prison. The herons are protected under the federal Migratory Bird Treaty Act.If caught, the perpetrators could face state and federal penalties, said Bob Graham, a spokesman for the Department of Natural Resources.
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