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Great Baltimore Fire

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By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1995
Don't listen for verbal pyrotechnics in Fred Shoken's Great Baltimore Fire walking tour.What you get is a well reasoned, fact-studded pilgrimage into urban history led by one the city's most learned students.The 39-year-old Mr. Shoken, who works for the parking division of the city's Department of Public Works, explains the events of Feb. 7-8, 1904, when a devastating blaze leveled commercial Baltimore."And so much has changed in the last 90 years, you can't even see Jones Falls that well," he said one day this week as he previewed what he'll be giving this Saturday afternoon.
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NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 20, 2011
Here where we live, far from Fukushima, we go about our business. The amygdala, the part of the human brain that worries about things, is not conditioned to worry about earthquakes and tsunamis in the Mid-Atlantic. We might worry about a snowstorm when the meteorologists issue a warning and the TV news operations go into panic mode. We worry about the effect of a tropical storm or an occasional hurricane; heavy rains create anxiety about the soundness of our roofs and basement walls.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Lori Sears and Lori Sears,SUN STAFF | February 5, 2004
It was a fire of catastrophic proportions. In about 30 hours, 140 acres of downtown Baltimore burned, the fire taking down 1,526 buildings and 2,500 businesses in its fury. The Great Baltimore Fire of 1904 was disastrous. But Baltimore would rebound. And within three years, Baltimore's business district would be rebuilt and reborn. It would, in fact, be better than before. Saturday marks the 100th anniversary of the historic Feb. 7, 1904, blaze that claimed 140 city blocks but somehow took only five lives.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
Who knew Baltimore's devastating fire of 1904 could look so cool? Not that artist David Brewster intended such an effect. But his large, strikingly colored works depicting that event, displayed in the "Conflagration" exhibit at C. Grimaldis Gallery, entertain the eye as much as they capture history. The bold orange and brown strokes of oil in the epic-sized "Spectacular Destruction/Great Baltimore Fire: View Southeast from Continental Trust Building (1904)" make a particularly compelling impression.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 11, 2005
In Baltimore City Judge finds man criminally liable in beating, fire death A 20-year-old Northwest Baltimore man who was convicted of beating and setting fire to a man who had apparently wandered into the wrong back yard was held criminally responsible yesterday for his crime. The ruling means that Dwayne Gibson will not be confined to a state psychiatric facility and instead will serve his sentence in a state prison. Circuit Judge Wanda K. Heard rejected Gibson's claim that psychological ailments made him incapable of understanding what he had done.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 9, 2006
As the nation prepares to look back on the events of Sept. 11, 2001, exactly 100 years ago today, Baltimoreans gathered for another remembrance. Jubilee Week, which began Sept. 9, 1906, was a weeklong series of events and parades, that marked the city's renaissance after the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904. It also was a civic outpouring that publicly thanked the firefighters who had so bravely risked their lives saving their city from the conflagration. The fire began Feb. 7, 1904, a blustery Sunday morning, in a nearly deserted downtown, when a passer-by noticed smoke coming from the six-story John E. Hurst Co. The building housed a dry goods and notions firm on what is now Redwood Street, between Liberty Street and Hopkins Place.
NEWS
By GILBERT SANDLER | July 26, 1994
WHEN POPE John Paul II visits Baltimore Oct. 23, a highlight of his itinerary will be a tour of the beautiful Cathedral of Mary Our Queen on North Charles Street. The event will be televised worldwide.Yet the pope's visit to the cathedral wouldn't be possible if on Feb. 7, 1904 the great Baltimore fire hadn't occurred -- or if Thomas O'Neil hadn't dared the firefighters to blow up his store, or if the wind hadn't shifted that afternoon or . . .But we getting are ahead of our story.On Sunday morning, Feb. 7, 1904, what would be known forever as the great Baltimore fire began in the dry goods firm of John E. Hurst & Co., located on the south side of Redwood Street between Hopkins Place and Liberty Street.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 19, 2000
In Baltimore County Disabled boy, 3, left on empty bus 4 hours after school pickup HILLENDALE -- A 3-year-old boy was left on a school bus for nearly four hours yesterday, and education officials and county police are investigating the incident. Officials discovered the disabled youngster asleep around 1 p.m., about four hours after he was picked up for a half-day school session at Halstead Academy, which offers special education programs and prekindergarten. His parents called the school when the boy did not return home around noon.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2010
Who knew Baltimore's devastating fire of 1904 could look so cool? Not that artist David Brewster intended such an effect. But his large, strikingly colored works depicting that event, displayed in the "Conflagration" exhibit at C. Grimaldis Gallery, entertain the eye as much as they capture history. The bold orange and brown strokes of oil in the epic-sized "Spectacular Destruction/Great Baltimore Fire: View Southeast from Continental Trust Building (1904)" make a particularly compelling impression.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | March 20, 2011
Here where we live, far from Fukushima, we go about our business. The amygdala, the part of the human brain that worries about things, is not conditioned to worry about earthquakes and tsunamis in the Mid-Atlantic. We might worry about a snowstorm when the meteorologists issue a warning and the TV news operations go into panic mode. We worry about the effect of a tropical storm or an occasional hurricane; heavy rains create anxiety about the soundness of our roofs and basement walls.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | September 9, 2006
As the nation prepares to look back on the events of Sept. 11, 2001, exactly 100 years ago today, Baltimoreans gathered for another remembrance. Jubilee Week, which began Sept. 9, 1906, was a weeklong series of events and parades, that marked the city's renaissance after the Great Baltimore Fire of 1904. It also was a civic outpouring that publicly thanked the firefighters who had so bravely risked their lives saving their city from the conflagration. The fire began Feb. 7, 1904, a blustery Sunday morning, in a nearly deserted downtown, when a passer-by noticed smoke coming from the six-story John E. Hurst Co. The building housed a dry goods and notions firm on what is now Redwood Street, between Liberty Street and Hopkins Place.
FEATURES
By SUN STAFF | February 4, 2006
You couldn't care less about quarterbacks or halfbacks or running backs. Or maybe you're just so bitter about the Ravens' season that you can't bear to watch the Steelers and the Seahawks face off tomorrow evening. Fear not: There are some escapes from the Super Bowl madness, or at least from the endless hours of pregame coverage. To maintain some machismo even while avoiding the big screens, head to the last hours of the World of Wheels Auto Show at the Baltimore Convention Center, 1 W. Pratt St. The annual auto show, which kicked off yesterday, features more than 30 clubs and 200 cars, plus assorted events and exhibits, including a fashion show by the Texas Bikini Team.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | June 19, 2005
Despite the name, the Great Baltimore Fire Chili Cookoff is no firehouse chili contest. No, for pros on the chili circuit, yesterday's showdown in Fells Point was far more serious than that. About half of the 14 contestants were plucky amateurs from Baltimore who competed on a lark because people tell them they make good chili. And, really, what could be better than eating and drinking beer on a sunny day by the Inner Harbor? But for the rest, Baltimore is just one more stop on the chili circuit, another chance to qualify for the national championship of the International Chili Society, one of two (yes, two)
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | February 11, 2005
In Baltimore City Judge finds man criminally liable in beating, fire death A 20-year-old Northwest Baltimore man who was convicted of beating and setting fire to a man who had apparently wandered into the wrong back yard was held criminally responsible yesterday for his crime. The ruling means that Dwayne Gibson will not be confined to a state psychiatric facility and instead will serve his sentence in a state prison. Circuit Judge Wanda K. Heard rejected Gibson's claim that psychological ailments made him incapable of understanding what he had done.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2004
Ever wonder why North Charles Street narrows above Fayette Street? Because that's where the Great Fire of 1904 stopped - and so did the subsequent widening of Charles. The traffic jam-inducing bottleneck is one of many lingering signs of the Burnt District, the 70-block swath of downtown Baltimore that marks the fire's destructive path 100 years ago. Many streets are wider only because of the fire. Many buildings are standing today only because the fire destroyed 1,500 others and created a huge demand for new construction.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | February 7, 2004
Robert M. McLane guided Baltimore through the Great Fire of 1904 and led a bold rebuilding effort. The 36-year-old blue-blood mayor found time, too, to sneak off and secretly marry a socialite hailed as one of the city's most beautiful women. Then on May 30, less than four months after the flames were doused, he shared a laugh with his bride at their West Preston Street home, walked into his dressing room and, according to a coroner, shot himself in the head with a .32-caliber Smith & Wesson revolver.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Keys | February 3, 2000
Forever Tango' Luis Bravo's sensual dance production struts across the stage Tuesday through Feb. 13 at the Warner Theatre, 13th and E streets Northwest, Washington. Don't miss the only Baltimore-Washington area presentation of "Forever Tango," which had a run on Broadway and features seven Argentine couples performing to music by an 11-piece string and piano orchestra. Show times are 8 p.m. Tuesday-Friday, 5 p.m. and 8: 30 p.m. Saturday, 3 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sunday. Cost: $19-$49. Call 202-783-4000.
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