Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGrbac
IN THE NEWS

Grbac

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | November 26, 2001
JACKSONVILLE, Fla. -- A week ago, Ravens quarterback Elvis Grbac had a tear in his eye. Yesterday, he was all smiles. A week ago, Grbac took his time getting out of the shower before facing the media. Yesterday, he came out and answered questions in his game pants and spikes. And then Grbac, Ravens coach Brian Billick and tight end Shannon Sharpe all played kissy, kissy and make up. It was cute, charming and so sickeningly sweet, much different from a week ago when Sharpe took subtle shots at Grbac for not getting the job done.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | March 16, 2011
The Ravens' decision to replace quarterback Trent Dilfer with Elvis Grbac after Dilfer steered the team to its only Super Bowl title was arguably one of the biggest follies in franchise history. And according to Adam Rank of NFL.com, Grbac was one of the biggest free-agent quarterback busts in NFL history, too. In a list published yesterday on NFL.com , Rank ranked the Ravens' acquisition of Grbac in 2001 as the second worst free-agent quarterback signing in league history.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | December 30, 2001
TAMPA, Fla. - The Ravens' best chance of winning stood beside Ravens coach Brian Billick last night, and wore No. 1 on his jersey. The name is Randall Cunningham. Billick may not want to start a quarterback controversy again, but a more mobile Cunningham was the team's best option in the second half in its 22-10 loss to the Tampa Bay Buccaneers last night. It's apparent that Billick wants to stick to his word and keep Grbac in the starting lineup, but this game had Cunningham written all over it. Grbac was ineffective in the first half and Cunningham's elusiveness and improvisation gave the Ravens more of a chance against a Tampa Bay defense that took target practice at a stationary target, Grbac.
SPORTS
By Steve DeClue and Steve DeClue,Special to baltimoresun.com | August 1, 2005
The Ravens came off their 2000 Super Bowl season with thoughts of repeating only to see those hopes dashed by a longtime rival in the second round of the NFL playoffs. The offseason began with news that Trent Dilfer was out and Elvis Grbac was in as starting quarterback. The move struck a chord with the national media, which found the ouster of a Super Bowl-winning quarterback to be an extension of the Ravens' arrogance. The team hoped Grbac would finally be the signal caller to cure their offensive woes, but the team quickly found out that the Dilfer era wasn't so bad after all. The Ravens also brought back all of their aging veterans from the previous season for one more run at a world championship.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston | March 7, 2001
WHY ELVIS Grbac? What makes him any different from the previous four quarterbacks used by Ravens coach Brian Billick in the past two years? The Ravens and Grbac, the former Kansas City Chiefs quarterback, yesterday agreed to a five-year deal worth $30 million, including an $11 million signing bonus. The contract will pay Grbac $13 million ($5 million to sign initially) over the next two seasons, and the Ravens have an option at that time to pick up the last three years, which would earn Grbac an additional $6 million.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | October 16, 2001
While his head remains cloudy, his intentions are clear. A day after suffering a concussion and a sprained neck in a 31-23 loss at Green Bay, Ravens quarterback Elvis Grbac announced that he expects to practice tomorrow and play Sunday at Cleveland. Nearly 24 hours since that painful hit by Packers defensive tackle Santana Dotson, Grbac acknowledged that the concussion was the scariest point of his nine-year career as he slowly began to resemble his old self. Besides battling constant headaches, he is sensitive to loud noises and bright lights.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | June 15, 2001
The preliminary camps are complete, but the education of new Ravens quarterback Elvis Grbac continues. The Ravens finished their four-day veterans camp yesterday, and Grbac has plenty of homework before the team reassembles for training camp July 29. For the next six weeks, he will be picking up playbooks and practice film, not footballs. When he reports to Western Maryland College, he wants a fresh arm and an instinctual knowledge of the system. "I'm going to be cramming for a test," Grbac said.
SPORTS
By SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE | November 19, 1995
SAN FRANCISCO -- Another miracle of modern medicine: Steve Young could get some playing time as the backup quarterback in Miami tomorrow night, a week after the 1994 NFL MVP had arthroscopic surgery on his left shoulder."
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2001
The baggage for the Ravens' trip to Cincinnati has changed in a year. That was then: Nov. 5, 2000. The Ravens brought a burdensome touchdown drought, a three-game losing skid and a desperate hope in Trent Dilfer. This is now: The Ravens are carrying Super Bowl rings, a 12-game winning streak and an instant trust in Elvis Grbac. As quickly as times have changed, so has the Ravens' offensive profile. No longer reliant on the run, the Ravens are comfortable clinging to the arm of Grbac. When the Ravens (1-0)
SPORTS
By Brent Jones and By Brent Jones,SUN STAFF | October 18, 2001
With the aftereffects of Sunday's concussion having subsided, Ravens quarterback Elvis Grbac went about his normal routine of preparing for the next opponent yesterday. In fact, Grbac said he felt better than usual after a couple of surprisingly good nights of sleep. "For some reason, maybe it loosened up some cobwebs up top, but I've felt good the last couple of nights," Grbac said. "I don't know what it is with concussions, but at night time, I felt great." This is not to say Grbac is itching for another concussion Sunday against Cleveland in his first game as a professional in his hometown.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | March 8, 2003
EVERY TIME Ravens coach Brian Billick goes on a peacekeeping mission, negotiations fall apart. He is no Kofi Annan. Last year at this time, Billick flew to Cleveland to meet with then quarterback Elvis Grbac. Soon afterward, Grbac retired. Last week, Billick flew to Florida to meet with Jeff Blake, and a few days later Blake was visiting the Chicago Bears and Pittsburgh Steelers. Billick ain't no Henry Kissinger, either. The man must have a sour rap. "I went down there as a show of respect," said Billick.
SPORTS
By MIKE PRESTON | June 6, 2002
CHRIS REDMAN doesn't have a swagger yet, but he has a little strut. Despite playing basically only two quarters in two years, Redman continues to grow in confidence with each offensive repetition at passing camp. No one really knows if Redman is the Ravens' quarterback of the future, but the third-year player out of Louisville has been impressive in his short stint as a starter. Redman still has to feel the hot breath of linebacker Jason Gildon pursuing him out of the pocket, and survive some of the blindside hits by Jevon Kearse.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 6, 2002
Elvis has left the building. Unfortunately for the Ravens, his cap number has not. Ravens coach Brian Billick said yesterday that the Ravens are limited in their attempt to re-sign free-agent cornerback Duane Starks because quarterback Elvis Grbac refused to agree to a $5 million pay cut last week. Although released by the Ravens on Friday, Grbac will still count $4 million against the Ravens' 2002 salary cap, which is the remaining pro-rated portion of a $5 million signing bonus on a five-year contract.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 5, 2002
Three days after his sudden termination by the Ravens, Elvis Grbac has decided to retire from football, his agent confirmed yesterday. According to Jim Steiner, the 31-year-old quarterback did not want to start over with another team and could not put his wife and three children through another move. On Friday, the Ravens released the heavily criticized Grbac after the two sides never came close on a restructured contract. Grbac was willing to take a $3.5 million pay reduction, but the Ravens were asking the league's 26th-rated passer to go from a total payout of $7.5 million in 2002 to $2.5 million.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2002
Chris Redman, the only Ravens quarterback of the present, will carry some advice from a Baltimore quarterback of the past when he tries to win a starting job this summer. "I'm definitely confident in my abilities," Redman said yesterday. "I think I can compete at this level. But I'm not going to give any predictions. That's not my style. Talk is cheap. I learned that from a guy who wore No. 19 for a long time." Those words came from Colts Hall of Fame quarterback Johnny Unitas, who has avidly watched Redman follow in his footsteps.
NEWS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2002
The Ravens have ended two weeks of roster dismantling by releasing quarterback Elvis Grbac after one tumultuous season. Two days of talks broke off bitterly yesterday when the Ravens and Grbac's agent, Jim Steiner, could not come close to reaching an agreement on a pay cut. Grbac, who signed a five-year, $30 million contract last March, was scheduled to make a total of $7.5 million for the 2002 season. In a season that began with expectations of a Super Bowl repeat, Grbac struggled to win games and win over fans.
SPORTS
By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | November 14, 1996
One day after the mayor of San Francisco called him an "embarrassment to humankind" for two damaging turnovers against the Dallas Cowboys on Sunday, 49ers quarterback Elvis Grbac said he would like to see a statement of apology.San Francisco Mayor Willie Brown criticized Grbac, who replaced Steve Young in the second half after Young sustained a mild concussion.Grbac threw two interceptions, including one that set up the Cowboys' tying score before the game went into overtime.Dallas drove 66 yards on 11 plays, and Chris Boniol kicked a winning 29-yard field goal, prompting Brown to say that Grbac would never play in a new city-built stadium.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | October 26, 2001
Though still feeling pain in his bruised ribs, Ravens quarterback Elvis Grbac angrily refuted a published report that said he told teammates that he most likely will not play against Jacksonville. Grbac reiterated yesterday that his decision on starting will probably not be made until after pregame warmups on Sunday. "I didn't say anything to my teammates," he said. "I couldn't believe it." Although he missed practice for the second straight day, Grbac did increase his number of throws on the side yesterday.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 2, 2002
After the sudden release of Elvis Grbac, the Ravens are not in a rush to name their sixth starting quarterback in three years. The team is favoring the plan of promoting third-string Chris Redman to starter and re-signing backup Randall Cunningham or another low-priced veteran as a backup, a league source said yesterday. The source added that the Ravens may acquire a third quarterback by selecting one in the second or third round in next month's NFL draft. Redman, a third-round pick in 2000, is the only choice at this time because he's the only quarterback on the roster.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,SUN STAFF | March 1, 2002
Today, the Ravens will learn whether quarterback Elvis Grbac will remain a part of their future. Yesterday, they had to say goodbye to another vital piece of their Super Bowl past. Completing the final step to remain under the league's $71.1 million salary cap by today, the Ravens terminated the contract of Sam Adams, saving $6.041 million of cap space. The two-time Pro Bowl defensive tackle was cut before receiving a roster bonus today and became the eighth starter from last year's second-ranked NFL defense to be put onto the free-agent market.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.