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NEWS
By JACK GERMOND & JULES WITCOVER | November 20, 1995
WASHINGTON -- It will be small consolation to the thousands of federal employees furloughed as a result of the government shutdown, but one surprising byproduct has come from Capitol Hill in the course of the latest demonstration of congressional gridlock.The overwhelming vote of 422-6 in the House of Representatives for a complete ban on gifts to members of the House and their staffs can be attributed in part to the members' awareness that the shutdown fiasco has made them look like a pack of lunkheads to the folks back home.
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NEWS
June 14, 2013
Letter writer David Liddle apparently wishes to persuade us to abandon the Constitution's Fourth Amendment in our quest for an elusive guarantee of security ("Don't worry: The NSA isn't interested in you," June 12). In doing so, however, he rejects a founding principle of our nation - checks on the power of government over individuals. Moreover, he expresses a naive belief that the overarching powers ceded to government will not be abused. Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower responsible for leaking news of the surveillance program's existence, has said that it does not really work the way the government describes.
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NEWS
January 5, 1996
MARYLAND'S LATEST round of real property assessments represents more bad news for city and county budget officials. The average increase of 1.3 percent in property values statewide means that local governments will have to look to other revenue sources to finance their budgets, or make further cuts.Stagnating property values are the flip side of nearly a half-decade's worth of disinflation. Leading up to the 1990s, local budget officials could count on property values rising at rates that were close to double digits.
NEWS
March 3, 2011
How much proof do the citizens of Maryland need that our legislators are out of touch with reality? At a time when gas prices are rising 10 cents to 20 cents per gallon per week, we hear that the state legislature is thinking about raising Maryland's gas tax. Why not kick us when we are down? Year after year the legislature has demonstrated fiscal irresponsibility by assuming that the economy is going to always function at a high level and increasing spending accordingly. Local jurisdictions should have anticipated an economic slowdown and planned for their infrastructure needs, but what do they do?
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Vicchio and Stephen Vicchio,Special to the Sun | March 24, 2002
Since the development of a hybrid German / English University model in the United States in the latter part of the 19th century, the debate over the question of tenure has largely been a story of accusation and invective. If the combatants are to be believed, it has been a tale of boogey men and sacred cows, or shall I say, boogey men or sacred cows. On the one side of the issue, the affirmative side, professors argue, with all the fervor of the prophet Jeremiah, that the very existence of academic freedom and the ability to attract and retain new faculty are at stake in any contemplation of significantly revising or eliminating academic tenure.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,States News Service | June 8, 1994
WASHINGTON -- Federal retirees are waiting to see if their pensions will be trimmed by two budget-cutting campaigns currently under way on Capitol Hill.In the Senate, a bipartisan panel has been considering entitlement cuts and will hold its first public meeting Monday.The 32-member Bipartisan Commission on Entitlement and Tax Reform is likely to consider a range of cuts, including limits in cost-of-living adjustments (COLAs) for civil service and military pensioners.Sen. Robert Kerrey, D-Neb.
NEWS
March 3, 2011
How much proof do the citizens of Maryland need that our legislators are out of touch with reality? At a time when gas prices are rising 10 cents to 20 cents per gallon per week, we hear that the state legislature is thinking about raising Maryland's gas tax. Why not kick us when we are down? Year after year the legislature has demonstrated fiscal irresponsibility by assuming that the economy is going to always function at a high level and increasing spending accordingly. Local jurisdictions should have anticipated an economic slowdown and planned for their infrastructure needs, but what do they do?
NEWS
June 14, 2013
Letter writer David Liddle apparently wishes to persuade us to abandon the Constitution's Fourth Amendment in our quest for an elusive guarantee of security ("Don't worry: The NSA isn't interested in you," June 12). In doing so, however, he rejects a founding principle of our nation - checks on the power of government over individuals. Moreover, he expresses a naive belief that the overarching powers ceded to government will not be abused. Edward Snowden, the NSA whistleblower responsible for leaking news of the surveillance program's existence, has said that it does not really work the way the government describes.
NEWS
November 27, 1998
Not enough vouchers or space to go around for Southern 0) studentsThe environment at Southern High School is unacceptable, but Gregory Kane's "Vouchers couldn't damage Southern High education" (Nov. 1) is dead wrong in stating that vouchers are the perfect solution.Here's why. It is unrealistic to think that private school space exists for more than a handful of Southern's students. And frankly, most, if not all, private schools wouldn't even take the troublemakers. Vouchers might help a few motivated students escape, but that leaves behind hundreds, if not thousands of students still fearing Stairwells 5 and 6, the first floor and the eruption of fights.
NEWS
October 9, 1991
Too LateEditor: What a sick, mean world we live in!How could any human being look at the picture of once-beautiful Kimberly Bergales and read her pitiful speech and not be moved to tears?Why should a person in her condition have to come before Congress to plead for a bill to be passed for mandated testing for health care workers and patients?The older I become, the less I comprehend what life and human dignity are all about.My heart breaks for Kimberly and her family, but that does them no good at all. It's late, far too late.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | September 15, 2007
Would you drive hundreds of miles for a slice of Matthew's stuffed pizza? Would you hop a plane if a Faidley's crab cake were waiting on the other side? How about building a vacation around the red-sauced enclave of Little Italy - sound reasonable? Local tourism officials think so. They believe Baltimore, like San Francisco and New York and New Orleans, packs the sort of flavor people will travel for, and they're aggressively - some might say ambitiously - marketing the city as a five-star food destination.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD and LIZ ATWOOD,SUN REPORTER | December 21, 2005
Did your Thanksgiving gravy turn out to be a disappointing companion to the turkey, mashed potatoes and dressing? Don't worry. There's still time to learn how to make a great gravy to serve with your Christmas and New Year's dinners. Chef Ian Vair, instructor at Baltimore International College, says the most common mistake cooks make in preparing gravy is not having the right proportions of fat, liquid and cornstarch or flour. There are two basic ways to make gravy. One begins with a roux, a mixture of fat and flour, and the other begins with a cornstarch slurry, a mix of cornstarch and cold water.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Vicchio and Stephen Vicchio,Special to the Sun | March 24, 2002
Since the development of a hybrid German / English University model in the United States in the latter part of the 19th century, the debate over the question of tenure has largely been a story of accusation and invective. If the combatants are to be believed, it has been a tale of boogey men and sacred cows, or shall I say, boogey men or sacred cows. On the one side of the issue, the affirmative side, professors argue, with all the fervor of the prophet Jeremiah, that the very existence of academic freedom and the ability to attract and retain new faculty are at stake in any contemplation of significantly revising or eliminating academic tenure.
FEATURES
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2002
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - He started out convinced that he would become Russia's Picasso. But it's unlikely you will have heard of Sergei Yushkevich. At 43, his hair is graying and slightly wispy, and the skin around his eyes is delicately etched with the wrinkles left by a million smiles. He knows he is good at what he does. He wields his brushes and oils with dexterity and skill. But doubts swirl in his soul like snowflakes whipped by the winter wind outside his studio window. Is he an artist?
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 26, 1999
Now I know what I want to be when I grow up. A member of the International Olympic Committee. They've got a few openings now, don't they? Six expulsions, three resignations, three other members still under investigation. Put me in, Your Excellency, I'm ready to play. Your Excellency, of course, is His Excellency, Juan Antonio Samaranch. That's what he demands to be called, even in Olympic contracts. And he's not going anywhere, baby. Samaranch -- president of the IOC, chancellor of the exchequer, whatever you want to call him -- said again yesterday that he does not plan to resign.
NEWS
November 27, 1998
Not enough vouchers or space to go around for Southern 0) studentsThe environment at Southern High School is unacceptable, but Gregory Kane's "Vouchers couldn't damage Southern High education" (Nov. 1) is dead wrong in stating that vouchers are the perfect solution.Here's why. It is unrealistic to think that private school space exists for more than a handful of Southern's students. And frankly, most, if not all, private schools wouldn't even take the troublemakers. Vouchers might help a few motivated students escape, but that leaves behind hundreds, if not thousands of students still fearing Stairwells 5 and 6, the first floor and the eruption of fights.
NEWS
September 15, 1996
Riding the suburban sprawl gravy trainSuburban sprawl is going to continue until we run out of space to sprawl because both politicians and residents like it.1.) Residential development means temporary construction and supply jobs and new residents to pay property and income taxes -- increasing the tax revenues while postponing or reducing the costs (schools, welfare) for current residents (voters). Poor folks don't buy new houses in suburbs.2.) Commercial sprawl means construction jobs, more permanent jobs for local residents and no social services to provide -- increasing the tax revenues with no increased taxes for current residents (voters)
FEATURES
By Robyn Dixon and Robyn Dixon,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | January 9, 2002
ST. PETERSBURG, Russia - He started out convinced that he would become Russia's Picasso. But it's unlikely you will have heard of Sergei Yushkevich. At 43, his hair is graying and slightly wispy, and the skin around his eyes is delicately etched with the wrinkles left by a million smiles. He knows he is good at what he does. He wields his brushes and oils with dexterity and skill. But doubts swirl in his soul like snowflakes whipped by the winter wind outside his studio window. Is he an artist?
NEWS
By DAVID SAFFORD | March 30, 1997
TC WASHINGTON -- Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr., a 2nd District Republican, wants the federal government to ante up $18.7 million over the next five years to finish rebuilding the Baltimore-Washington Parkway.He also wants $200 million to upgrade the MARC commuter rail system. In fact, the entire Maryland delegation thinks that's such a good idea that all of its members have all signed a letter asking the federal government to pay for it.Take a number and get in line, folks. There are a lot of legislators ahead of you and there's no guarantee that you'll be served.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1997
HOLLYWOOD -- It may be the middle of February, but here it's Christmas time.The nominees for Oscars are to be announced today, which means there are only 41 voting days until the Academy Awards. So this is the high season for the reporters and editors at the Daily Variety, the trade newspaper whose beat is Hollywood."Oscar day is L.A.'s unofficial national holiday, Los Angeles' holiest day, and we cover it with that in mind," says Jonathan Taylor, Daily Variety's editor. "We are a small-town paper, covering a small town that happens to be plopped in the middle of a huge city and that is enormously powerful."
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