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By Joanne E. Morvay | January 27, 1999
* Item: IKEA's Swedish Meatballs and Cream Gravy* What you get: 2 1/2 pounds of meatballs, 16 ounces of gravy (sold separately)* Cost: About $10 for meatballs, $2 for gravy* Preparation time: 15-20 minutes for meatballs, 20 minutes for gravy* Review: My mother -- who is of Swedish descent -- makes meatballs so light and tasty that guests are disappointed if she has a party and doesn't offer them. So maybe I'm too particular when tasting other meatballs. But I'm a big fan of IKEA's food and furniture, so I was truly disappointed when I tried these frozen meatballs.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
The many good reasons to check out Miller's Deli in the Greenspring Shopping Center are written on the restaurant's wall. The big menu lists items that can carry you from breakfast through dinner. And liver and onions ($9.99), well, Miller's has that, too. The deep, foamy plastic plate felt like it weighed five pounds. On it, buried under easily a heaping cup of translucent onion strips, were two fairly thin slabs of fried liver, about six inches long and 4 inches wide. But let's talk mashed potatoes, which came with the platter.
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FEATURES
By Nancy Byal and Nancy Byal,Better Homes and Gardens Magazine | November 20, 1991
Satin-smooth gravy is one of the crowning touches of the holiday turkey dinner. For those who don't make gravy regularly, the secret to lump-free gravy is here. For a personal touch, you can add a dried herb (such as thyme, basil, or tarragon) or sliced mushrooms before stirring in the flour.When your turkey has finished roasting, use sturdy meat forks to transfer it to a serving platter. Then pour the meat juices into a two-cup glass measuring cup. Tilt the measuring cup and spoon off the fat, reserving one-quarter cup of the fat. (The fat is the oily liquid that rises to the top.)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 18, 2011
Friends and fans of Owl Meat Gravy will gather in Little Italy on Sunday, Aug. 21 in the lounge at Chipparelli's for a  celebration of his life and writing. The informal event will begin at 7:30 p.m. and all are welcome to attend. Bob Swank, best known for his masterful writing on electronic media under the name Owl Meat Gravy died in his Little Italy home late last week. Swank wrote, post, tweeted and updated regularly from his perch at Chipparelli's . "We want everyone from all facets of his life to attend," said Carson Jacokes, a bartender at Chipparelli's who helped plan Sunday evening's gathering.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | November 6, 2002
I HAVE HEARD that it is important to have goals in your life. Accordingly, my goal during this particular stretch of my journey on the planet is to make good turkey gravy while cooking the bird on the grill. In barbecue terms this is the equivalent of having your cake and eating it, too. Traditionally, cooking the bird on the grill has been a trade-off. You get a great-tasting, smoky bird. But since the bird has been perched on the grate of the grill, not in the oven in a roasting pan, there have been no pan drippings and, hence, no gravy.
FEATURES
By Lisa Pollak and Lisa Pollak,SUN STAFF | November 27, 2003
Happy Thanksgiving, Baltimore. Pass the turkey, please, and don't forget the viscous combination of turkey stock, water, wheat flour, turkey fat, modified food starch, autolized yeast extract, seasonings and caramel coloring otherwise known as canned gravy. According to the people who are paid to study such matters, Baltimoreans bought more canned gravy, per capita, than shoppers in 51 other major markets last Thanksgiving. (For those feeling competitive, Memphis is apparently the big city where most gravy is cooked from scratch, with people there buying 83 percent less canned gravy at Thanksgiving than during other weeks of the year.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | April 1, 2009
Looking for hope I'm starting to sense that many of you are resigned to a poor 2009 for the Orioles, as long as you see bright spots. I think that's the way you have to look at the coming season, and any extra is gravy (the good type). (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/cornersportsbar)
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | January 9, 2009
Dining in Nashville means having your cardiologist on speed dial. A look at the local food and drink of the Music City and Charm City: NASHVILLE Country ham and red-eye gravy Get this: The gravy starts with the drippings in a pan in which slices of ham were fried. So it's ham gravy on ham. Served with a nice ham salad? Pork barbecue In case you didn't get enough ham. MoonPie Graham-cracker cookies, marshmallow filling, chocolate dip. Who needs a bathroom scale, anyway? Stack cake Sugar, eggs, molasses, buttermilk, flour ... you can feel your arteries hardening.
FEATURES
By Arthur Schwartz and Arthur Schwartz,New York Daily News | March 6, 1991
"I miss the gravy," confided an often-quoted nutritionist, a public vegetarian. "So I tend to cook stew and pot roast a lot for my family."She has a husband and two teen-age sons who are definitely not vegetarians."I give them all the meat, but I sneak a little gravy and put it on potatoes or pasta," she says. "The gravy has all the flavor of the meat without the meat. It's only cheating a little bit, don't you think?"That gravy goes far to satisfy meat cravings is something our forebears need not have been told by a nutritionist.
NEWS
By William Rice and William Rice,Special to the Sun | April 7, 2002
Today the ever-expanding boundaries of comfort food include a dish that in recent years has been more talked about than eaten, except at truck stops. I refer to the chicken-fried steak, an inexpensive cut of beef that is coated in flour and fried until brown. Quick to cook and economical, it can be a treat. Or it can be tough, tired and weighed down by a pan gravy that has the texture and taste of wallpaper paste. There's no secret to success, really. If your steak is inexpensive, and it should be, it's going to be tough.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2011
Yesterday, I was stunned to hear of Owl Meat Gravy's death. I didn't know him - not really - but I felt like I did. Over the years, he contributed dozens of guest posts and hundreds of comments on Midnight Sun. He was an incredibly smart writer. Sometimes too smart. And he had a huge personality that occasionally rubbed people the wrong way. But Owl Meat, OMG, Owlie - whatever you want to call him, he had an unmistakable presence on Midnight Sun, as well as the rest of The Sun's website.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2011
The writer and poet Bob Swank, best known for his masterful writing on electronic media under the name Owl Meat Gravy died in his Little Italy home late last week. I don't know precise details concerning the death. I might not publish them even if I did know.  Larvatus prode o, the Latin phrase that Owl Meat Gravy chose as the motto on his writer's card, means, "I go forward wearing a mask. " Bob Swank shared his writing with the world through Twitter, and through Facebook and on this newspaper's online commenting forums as well as his own blog.
SPORTS
By Peter Schmuck | October 15, 2010
News item: The Ravens will improve to 5-1 on Sunday if they can beat the New England Patriots for the first time ever in the regular season. My take: But it won't be the end of the world if they don't. If I had told you in Week 1 that they would be 4-2 after the toughest six-game stretch of the season, you would have signed on the dotted line. Now, you're just getting greedy. News item: Brett Favre is facing a possible suspension by the NFL for allegedly sending obscene cell phone pictures of himself to a young New York Jets game hostess.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | April 1, 2009
Looking for hope I'm starting to sense that many of you are resigned to a poor 2009 for the Orioles, as long as you see bright spots. I think that's the way you have to look at the coming season, and any extra is gravy (the good type). (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/cornersportsbar)
SPORTS
By Kevin Cowherd | January 9, 2009
Dining in Nashville means having your cardiologist on speed dial. A look at the local food and drink of the Music City and Charm City: NASHVILLE Country ham and red-eye gravy Get this: The gravy starts with the drippings in a pan in which slices of ham were fried. So it's ham gravy on ham. Served with a nice ham salad? Pork barbecue In case you didn't get enough ham. MoonPie Graham-cracker cookies, marshmallow filling, chocolate dip. Who needs a bathroom scale, anyway? Stack cake Sugar, eggs, molasses, buttermilk, flour ... you can feel your arteries hardening.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER and ROB KASPER,rob.kasper@baltsun.com | September 24, 2008
It may not be a Maryland fried chicken that can trace its lineage back to the arrival of the Ark and the Dove, to the beginnings of our state. But it sure tastes good. I am talking about the Maryland fried chicken with cream gravy that I found in The Cook's Country Cookbook, a newly published collection of 500 American recipes put together by the editors at America's Test Kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Lindner, Special to The Baltimore Sun | February 5, 2012
The many good reasons to check out Miller's Deli in the Greenspring Shopping Center are written on the restaurant's wall. The big menu lists items that can carry you from breakfast through dinner. And liver and onions ($9.99), well, Miller's has that, too. The deep, foamy plastic plate felt like it weighed five pounds. On it, buried under easily a heaping cup of translucent onion strips, were two fairly thin slabs of fried liver, about six inches long and 4 inches wide. But let's talk mashed potatoes, which came with the platter.
FEATURES
By BOB KASPER | February 3, 1991
Today we are going to have a series of guest lecturers. This is a trick I learned from teachers. Whenever they run out of new things to say, or can't crank up enough enthusiasm to restate what they have said so many times before, they invite colleagues to lecture.While this column has rarely been accused of being "educational," there are certain parallels with the classroom situation. Namely the audience is expecting to hear something, the usual speaker has nothing to offer, and there are lots of folks, gassed up and ready to go, waiting in the wings.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | November 23, 2007
Instead of scalpels, University of Maryland medical students picked up spatulas and ladles yesterday. They served hot turkey, mashed potatoes and vegetables to about 300 people at a Thanksgiving dinner at a West Baltimore middle school. The event, called Project Feast, is an 18-year holiday tradition for students. With the stress of schoolwork and exams, students said they sometimes forget about the surrounding community and poor people. "We're students stuck in the books," said Sarah Bui, a second-year medical student who co-coordinated this year's Project Feast.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun reporter | November 21, 2007
Instead of gathering at Grandma's house, they'll eat gourmet turkey dinners and champagne brunches at casino hotels. They've scored hard-to-come-by tickets to popular shows, such as Jubilee at Bally's Hotel and Cirque de Soleil. And they'll avoid the scores of business convention-goers who fill the city at other times of the year. Sin City, surprising as it might seem, has become a hot getaway for this family-centered, wholesome holiday. Las Vegas is the second-most-popular Thanksgiving travel destination on Travelocity.
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