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NEWS
February 3, 2011
Thank you for publishing Peter Sprigg's "Same-sex marriage is contrary to the public interest" (Feb. 2). I am shocked at the state legislature's egoism in feeling that they are so all-wise and powerful that they can force gay marriage on Marylanders. Voting against traditional marriage is like voting against the law of gravity — you can vote against it, but that does not change the true institution of marriage, a union between one man and one woman. Of course, we want kindness and respect for all people, but tolerance does not mean that anyone who wants to marry should be able to marry.
ARTICLES BY DATE
HEALTH
By Arthur Hirsch, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2014
Johns Hopkins University scientists are building a telescope meant to look at space in a way no one has before, hoping to probe the blackness between planets, stars and galaxies, into deep time and the mystery of how it all began. For decades, scientists have used telescopes to plumb the origins of the universe, but have not applied the scale or precision of the project that will use a four-telescope array called the Cosmology Large-Angular Scale Surveyor, or CLASS, being built now at the university's Bloomberg Center for Physics and Astronomy.
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TRAVEL
By Judi Dash and Judi Dash,Special to the Sun | January 2, 2000
Ambitious architects are not letting the little matter of no way to get there hold them back from designing orbiting hotels and lunar resorts, including an ambitious plan for a lunar Hilton. First dreamed up in 1967 by hotelier Baron Hilton, the plan has now taken on a reality of its own. The British-based chain has hired London architect Peter Inston to design a $3-billion glass-domed resort with 5,000 pressurized guest rooms, private baths, galactic views, a lunar beach and artificial sea. Honolulu architects Wimberly Allison Tong & Goo are designing a 100-guest space hotel with partial-gravity accommodations and dining rooms on the spinning perimeter so guests don't have to be taped to the walls to sleep, their food stays on the plate, and restroom visits do not require complex acrobatics.
NEWS
June 13, 2014
If most of us consider it an accomplishment to walk and chew gum at the same time, the Peking Acrobats are way beyond the human norm when it comes to physical dexterity. They'll demonstrate their extreme feats when appearing at a Columbia Festival of the Arts event on Saturday, June 21 at 8 p.m. at the Jim Rouse Theatre at Wilde Lake. These jugglers, tumblers, cyclists, gymnasts and contortionists do things so difficult that you wonder how in the world they're able to do some of them.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | September 1, 1995
School 33's latest main gallery exhibit -- one of its more thought-provoking recent shows -- is called "Anti-Gravity." It might better be called "Gender Concerns."The works of the show's four women artists each have something to do with flying or otherwise defying gravity. The figures on Patricia Autenrieth's quilts are pictured as a falling Icarus in one case and a constellation in another. Kay Dilisio's sculptures are high off the floor on wooden stilts. Beckie Laughlin says her paintings of circles within circles have to do with levitation and flying in dreams.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | December 9, 1992
Take three or four young men, each with testosterone levels in the 97-octane range. Add poverty, hopelessness, contempt for authority and, finally, lots of guns. What you have is a recipe for catastrophe and the script for a terrific movie about a catastrophe, "Laws of Gravity," which opens today at the Charles.Of a piece with its more famous brethren "One False Move" and the soon-to-arrive "Reservoir Dogs," as derived from the original inspiration, "Mean Streets," many years back, "Laws of Gravity" is a small, mean, utterly authentic American movie about crime.
FEATURES
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder/Tribune | February 22, 1998
RECENTLY, WHILE visiting New York City (civic motto: "I Got Yer Civic Motto Right Here"), I saw an alarming article in the New York Times, which is a newspaper up there, stating that large chunks of masonry were falling off some of the older buildings.As bad luck would have it in such a crowded city, several of these chunks, tragically, failed to land on George Steinbrenner.The Times article quoted experts as saying that the solution to the falling-chunks problem was to inspect old buildings.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Pakenham | April 1, 2001
Serious writers who have suffered agonies rarely have the option of shutting up about them. If their craftsmanship can't conquer the unbearable, the argument goes, then how can it be trusted as a tool of truth? Dodging that confrontation is -- well, artistically dodgy. Peggy Rambach, third of the four wives of the late Andre Dubus, himself a powerful writer and a tortured soul, is no dodger. That's starkly obvious from "Fighting Gravity" (Steerforth Press, 144 pages, $19). Why she chose to make the story a novel instead of a straight-out memoir had to be a very private decision.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 29, 2004
I HAVEN'T ATTEMPTED to ski for years, but recently I decided to take another stab at it. I was hoping they'd done something about the gravity problem. Gravity is the biggest drawback to skiing. Without gravity, it would be a carefree activity: You'd put on your skis, head for the slopes and just ... hover for a while. Then it would be time for "apres ski" (French for "no longer skiing"). Instead, you have gravity. Huge amounts of it. Ski areas are located smack dab on top of giant gravity piles called "mountains."
NEWS
By Matt Whittaker and Matt Whittaker,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2004
Inside the Charm City Skate Park on O'Donnell Street, the smell of sawdust and the echo of skateboard wheels on wood fill the air as skaters fly down steep ramps, flip and spin their boards, ride rails, wipe out and run back to start the course over again. But it's not just any day in the skate park. The 15 skaters sailing off smooth Masonite and plywood ramps yesterday inside the warehouse-size building competed for a chance to compete in this year's national Gravity Games, an Outdoor Life Network competition in Cleveland featuring winners from more than 25 regional amateur skateboard and bike competitions.
NEWS
March 21, 2014
People keep talking about how natural gas is cleaner than coal ( "Natural gas is bring manufacturing back to the U.S.," March 17). Maybe it burns cleaner, but it's the process we're using to capture the gas that is the problem. The first step in hydraulic fracturing is to poison millions (yes, millions) of gallons of water to pump into the rock. There is no way to clean that poisoned water. The CEOs say there is, but the chemists whose job it is to clean it up are still trying to figure it out. They haven't succeeded.
SPORTS
By Eric Meany, The Baltimore Sun | November 9, 2013
The ball field at Third Avenue Park in Glen Burnie is less than a 100-yard stroll through the woods from Frank Buckland's home. It is a walk that he and Laddy, a 42-pound Australian cattle dog/collie mix, frequently take to practice the sport that has made Buckland a seven-time world champion. "I've always had a love for dogs," Buckland said. "I've had them following me around ever since I was a kid. " When Laddy followed the 68-year-old retiree to the park on a recent early-autumn afternoon, the wag of the dog's tail and the energy in his stride made obvious his enthusiasm for the task at hand.
NEWS
By Douglas MacKinnon | October 22, 2013
I recently had a chance to watch the space-themed film "Gravity," starring Sandra Bullock and George Clooney. Leaving aside the multitude of technical errors in the film, as someone who has consulted in the space business for a number years, I always welcome it when Hollywood brings much needed attention to human spaceflight and its importance to us as a people and a nation. That said, as the film played, I wondered if others would also find the casting and script as ironic and troubling as I did. While Ms. Bullock works hard to keep her political views private while quite possibly being the most decent and generous person in the film business, Mr. Clooney has never made it a secret that he is an enthusiastic supporter of Barack Obama and the Democratic Party.
BUSINESS
Gus G. Sentementes | June 5, 2012
Here's an interesting idea that Northern Virginia startup BizGravity is tackling: Enabling busy executives to auction off meeting times with people who want to meet for business development, and then donate the proceeds to charity. Think EBay meets LinkedIn, says co-founder John Aggrey. "If you're going to play a round of golf, why not auction off the time," said Aggrey, who's also chairman and CEO of the Unicorn Group , a biz-dev and management consulting group . "Because two or threee people might be willing to pay for that time.
NEWS
By M. Hirsh Goldberg | May 29, 2011
Another prophesied Doomsday has passed, leaving doomsayers in deep gloom. But there are two other doom scenarios that should worry us — or at least concern future generations. We all know about global warming, but I recently started worrying about the twin dangers of global wobbling and solar gobbling. I discussed these concerns with a leading astronomer, and he both confirmed and consoled me about my fears. Michael Shara, a former Baltimorean and family friend, now serves as curator of astrophysics at the American Museum of Natural History in New York City.
NEWS
February 3, 2011
Thank you for publishing Peter Sprigg's "Same-sex marriage is contrary to the public interest" (Feb. 2). I am shocked at the state legislature's egoism in feeling that they are so all-wise and powerful that they can force gay marriage on Marylanders. Voting against traditional marriage is like voting against the law of gravity — you can vote against it, but that does not change the true institution of marriage, a union between one man and one woman. Of course, we want kindness and respect for all people, but tolerance does not mean that anyone who wants to marry should be able to marry.
NEWS
October 8, 2001
THE START of the U.S.-British military campaign yesterday in Afghanistan was, as Prime Minister Tony Blair said, a "moment of utmost gravity for the world." Americans must expect casualties among U.S. forces and innocent civilians, no matter how hard the allies try to avoid them. Americans must also expect no speedy conclusion or splashy victories. The initial cruise missile strikes were, as President Bush said yesterday, "designed to clear the way for sustained, comprehensive and relentless operations," to drive terrorists out of Afghanistan and into justice.
NEWS
By Robert S. Boyd and Robert S. Boyd,McClatchy-Tribune | March 9, 2007
NASA and the Air Force are studying ways to ward off a medium-sized asteroid that will streak within 18,000 miles of Earth in 2029 and has an extremely slight chance of crashing into our planet in 2036. Ideas discussed this week at a Planetary Defense Conference in Washington include a "gravity tug" or "space tractor" that would hover near the space rock and tow it into a safe orbit. Other possibilities include a head-on collision with an unmanned spaceship or a nuclear explosion. In the past eight years, 754 asteroids bigger than 1 kilometer (about six-tenths of a mile, or 3,280 feet)
NEWS
By Tim Swift | August 16, 2009
TV 'Top Chef': This season may be set in Las Vegas, but that doesn't mean we aren't represented. Three chefs from Maryland (Baltimore's Jesse Sandlin, above, and Frederick brothers Bryan and Michael Voltaggio) are in the running for the cooking crown. And they're not wallflowers. All three get ample screen time in the opener. Airs 10 p.m. Wednesday on Bravo. FESTIVAL 64 Bit Gen Gamer Fest: The Ottobar's homage to retro games gets a 32-bit upgrade this year with a celebration of hits from the mid-'90s.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | July 9, 2008
RUSUTSU, Japan - President Bush and leaders of the world's richest nations pledged yesterday to "move toward a low-carbon society" by cutting greenhouse gas emissions in half by 2050, the latest step in a long evolution by a president who for years played down the threat of global warming. The declaration by the Group of Eight - the United States, Japan, Germany, Britain, France, Italy, Canada and Russia - was the first time that the Bush White House had publicly backed an explicit long-term target for eliminating the gases that scientists have said are warming the planet.
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