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By CARLETON JONES | October 20, 1991
In the midwinter of 1862 heavy pieces of field artillery were dragged up the slopes of a remote village in western Washington County. Fear had struck the people of Hancock, for in nearby Virginia, high above both the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal and the Potomac River, were the troops of Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson.The rebels were spotted probing deep into the western highlands. And then suddenly they began a barrage of Hancock from the Virginia side of the river.Citizens of the village hurried their artillery in place: Union batteries that opposed the military terror of the Shenandoah Valley.
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May 2, 2012
HCC Actors Guild will present "Elephant's Graveyard" May 4 through 6 at Harford Community College's Black Box Theater in Joppa Hall. Performances are at 8 p.m. on May 4 and 5 and Saturdays and at 3 p.m. on May 6. "Elephant's Graveyard" by George Brant is the true tale of the tragic collision of a struggling circus and a tiny town in Tennessee that resulted in the only known lynching of an elephant. Set in September 1916, the play combines the historical fact and legend, exploring the deep-seated craving for spectacle, violence and revenge.
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NEWS
By Victor Paul Alvarez and Victor Paul Alvarez,Contributing Writer | April 11, 1995
They are only 12 years old, but they speak for the dead.Jenny McWhorter, a sixth-grader at Clarksville Middle School, discovered a cemetery hidden in the thick brush of woods behind her house two years ago. She shared the secret with three friends and Pat Greenwald, the gifted and talented resource teacher at the school.In that program, students are encouraged to investigate a problem that interests them and develop a solution. Given the amount of development in the county, Jenny said the cemetery seemed a perfect candidate for investigation.
EXPLORE
By Mike Giuliano | February 14, 2012
There's a lot of talk in Irish playwright Martin McDonagh's "A Skull in Connemara," and some of what its characters say may even be true. Sadness and violence also percolate just beneath the surface of the jocular banter, prompting uneasy laughter from the audience at Center Stage. That volatile mix of emotions is something of a trademark for McDonagh, whose credits include "The Beauty Queen of Leenane," "The Lonesome West" and "The Cripple of Inishmaan. " He knows how to pull you into an amusing story and then jolt you with its less amusing undercurrents.
NEWS
By JEAN LESLIE | February 14, 1994
Teachers all know that they are the ones who learn the most in the classroom.This truism is demonstrated once again in the classroom of Katherine Potocki, a reserved, soft-spoken veteran teacher with a slight Southern accent, who teaches eighth-grade American history at Patapsco Middle School in Ellicott City.In 1989, three boys brought a grocery bag filled with antique dishes, old bottles and pottery shards which they had found while playing in a local cemetery.As the children and Mrs. Potocki investigated, they found that the old ceramics were "graveyard goods," household items placed as headstones on the graves of the poor who could not afford carved stones.
NEWS
By Suzanne Loudermilk and Suzanne Loudermilk,SUN STAFF | June 14, 1996
Downtown Towson is about to have its first archaeological dig -- thanks to a tiny family cemetery that is delaying a $25 million redevelopment project.The long-neglected graveyard -- a resting place for the Towsons, Schmucks and Shealeys who pioneered the town -- is next to the site of a proposed 800-car parking garage that would be connected by a walkway to a rejuvenated Hutzler's building. Plans are being held up to determine whether there are human remains beyond the iron fence that surrounds the cemetery.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | June 6, 2001
Descendants of two founding families of Howard County turned out in force yesterday to thank county officials for dropping plans to seize part of the families' Savage graveyard for a road-widening project. About 15 descendants of the King and White families attended a news conference at county headquarters where they presented officials with a painting of the 1-acre graveyard. "This is a great day for the descendants of the Kings and the Whites," said Kathy King Kulick of Catharpin, Va. "Some things are simply too valuable to sacrifice to bulldozers."
NEWS
By Alan Feuer and Alan Feuer,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | August 3, 2001
NEW YORK -- There is a graveyard in Queens where the Mafia goes to rest in peace. Its rolling swards are tended by uniformed gardeners, and the marble crypts are reminiscent of a grander age. It is a placid plot of 243 acres that was opened in 1881. It is a landscape of silent stone and quiet grass and bird song, and its utter peacefulness holds no sign of the violent deeds of those interred within. St. John's Cemetery is the final resting place for more than a dozen Mafia dons and their henchmen.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Evening Sun Staff | April 24, 1991
Joe German whacks his way with his cane through the brambles and dry brush toward his grandmother's grave."I remember this graveyard was just like a lawn," German says. He's 83, hearty, well-preserved and still a bit countrified. He's lived almost all his life in this little piece of Howard County near Ellicott City.He's stomping through St. Mary's Cemetery, a Catholic burial ground now more than a century old. He's prowled through the old cemetery since he was a boy. Today, St. Mary's is overgrown with loose underbrush beneath a stand of poplar, walnut and a few locust.
NEWS
By ANN LOLORDO | August 22, 1993
Oberlin, La. -- At the juncture of two country lanes, the Sonniers have buried their dead.Here in Allen Parish, amid the lush green fields of rice along State Highway 26, a sign points the way to a slip of pasture, rimmed by fence posts weathered gray. There, beyond rain rusted gates held fast with a wire hook, lie members of a Cajun clan who settled in this spit of central Louisiana more than a century ago.This is America beyond the urban skyline and suburban sprawl, a sweep of country far from interstates and airports where fathers still live within sight of their daughters, and some traditions, like burying kin in a small family graveyard on the edge of a field, live as long as a great pin oak.At the Sonnier Cemetery, whitewashed crosses, unmarked cement vaults and, in recent years, squares of polished marble distinguish married kin from blood relation, husband from wife, father from son. And while the headstones seem unremarkable, Ruby Robichaux mentions their orientation.
NEWS
By Larry Carson, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2011
More than 1,950 Howard County residents remained without power at Friday afternoon, as many struggled to regain a sense of normalcy after enduring a new twist in Mother Nature's winter repertoire. Tales of marathon commutes home Wednesday night, more than 120 abandoned vehicles — including on major highways — and cracking tree branches burdened with the heavy, frozen, wet snow set back many people who thought 2010's February storms would be the worst snow experience they would see. Howard County's public schools opened two hours late Friday due to the conditions.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,andrea.walker@baltsun.com | October 24, 2008
Towson Town Center probably didn't have the best timing yesterday when it unveiled a new luxury wing featuring a Burberry apparel store and plans for Louis Vuitton and Lacoste amid an economy that continues to falter. Shoppers faced with declining stock portfolios, job losses, devalued homes and less access to credit presumably have little room in their budgets for $600 purses and $1,000 coats. Retailers across the country have shut their doors as shoppers spend less. And General Growth Properties, the owner of Towson Town and several other regional malls, has said debt problems exacerbated by the economic climate could force it to sell assets or even the whole company.
SPORTS
By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,ken.murray@baltsun.com | September 7, 2008
The longest-running riddle in Ravens history is Baltimore's hot topic once again. Who's the quarterback? It reads like the film comedy Groundhog Day, but is perhaps better suited to a 1939 radio speech by Winston Churchill: It's a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma. And now it's coach John Harbaugh's turn to unravel the mystery, more or less. For the season opener today, the answer is Joe Flacco. Next week it might be Troy Smith or Todd Bouman. Next month it might be someone not even on the roster now. Know this about quarterbacking for the Ravens: There is a long list of failure.
BUSINESS
By CHARLES JAFFE | December 25, 2007
One thing fund investors know for sure about 2008: We won't have the Ameritor Investment fund to kick around any more. Inarguably the worst mutual fund in history, it's one of hundreds of funds that were snuffed out of existence in 2007. Mutual funds aren't human, so their death - whether by liquidation or merger - does not diminish us the way the passing of a friend or loved one does. While there is no mourning period, it would be wrong to ignore for whom the bell tolled, if only because some funds leave behind a legacy of lessons for fund investors.
NEWS
By C. Fraser Smith | April 15, 2007
Maryland's political leaders, virtually all of them Democrats, spent the recently concluded General Assembly session whistling past the graveyard. They had their reasons. It was their graveyard. And they know the ghosts are real. They're determined to find the bright side because they know the voters and the corporate interests that help finance their campaigns would like to whistle along with them. The graveyard in question is Maryland's unsupportable financial situation. The cost of government has gone up, boosted by altogether worthy state initiatives.
FEATURES
By KRISTIN GRAY and KRISTIN GRAY,SUN REPORTER | October 28, 2006
In the glow of moonlight's faint pallor, ghastly figures creep waywardly among the living. A chainsaw's grating whine clips the air as clusters of teens scurry with terrified squeals. But when the ghouls and goblins begin to belt show tunes and dance with theatrical precision, the scene quickly evolves into a family-friendly night of thrills. The musical ghosts at Six Flags America's annual Fright Fest are among just one of many area attractions promising a frightfully good time this weekend before Halloween.
NEWS
By Alec MacGillis and Alec MacGillis,SUN STAFF | March 3, 2001
Tucked between an asphalt plant and a construction company on Guilford Road in Howard County is the burial site of Kings. They are the Kings who married into the Whites, one of the oldest - and, as surprised county officials now know, proudest - families in all of Maryland. From far and wide, descendants of the Whites and Kings swarmed the county this week - not for a wedding, not for a funeral, but to protect the honor of their family. Their common foe: a road project. As part of a planned widening of Guilford Road between Interstate 95 and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway, county officials have tentatively decided to cut about 30 feet into an open lot across from the Dorsey Run Business Center.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN STAFF | November 2, 1995
Rachel E. Phibbons is buried by the No U-turn sign. Jennie Richardson Grimes rests near the Right Turn Only lane. John Franklin Pearson is remembered by the stoplight.The Luther A. Palmer Memorial Cemetery is a traffic island. It sits where Riva Road meets West Street on the outskirts of Annapolis, a triangle of land squeezed by four-lane roads, left turn lanes and idling cars waiting for lights to change."You don't want to pay your respects during any kind of rush hour," said Virgil Carr Jr., 63, whose ancestors are buried at the busy intersection.
NEWS
By SUMATHI REDDY and SUMATHI REDDY,SUN REPORTER | December 12, 2005
The young men shuffle out of the van, a mass of puffy black jackets spilling onto a vast expanse of green grass and worn gravestones. Walker Gladden III calls them to attention. "Our young people are dying," says Gladden, 31, his baritone voice filling the otherwise empty Baltimore Cemetery. "Young men are being killed just about every single day." Young men like them. "We can't stop death," Gladden says, his voice rising as a siren sounds in the distance. "But we ain't gotta meet it through someone pulling the trigger."
NEWS
By TOM PELTON and TOM PELTON,SUN REPORTER | December 5, 2005
ON THE POTOMAC RIVER -- Susan Langley glides her kayak up to the slouching wooden hull of a shipwreck and tugs a wooden peg out of a wall of planks encrusted with barnacles. All around the archaeologist, the rotting ribs of more than 200 ships jut from the murky waters of a shallow bay near Nanjemoy in Southern Maryland. She's exploring one of America's largest maritime graveyards - nicknamed "the ghost fleet of Mallows Bay" - which will soon be turned into a public park and wildlife area.
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