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By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 12, 1996
I recently developed Graves' disease and have been having problems with my eyes. They seem to "bulge," and are quite irritated and puffy. What causes these symptoms? Will they go away once my thyroid is treated? What can be done for my eyes?In Graves' disease, a common disorder, the thyroid gland enlarges and produces too much thyroid hormone, a condition called hyperthyroidism. With it comes anxiety and restlessness; palpitations; weight loss despite an increased appetite and food intake; excessive sweating and intolerance to heat; tremors of the fingers; fatigue and muscle weakness; and diarrhea or an increased number of bowel movements.
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NEWS
October 19, 2009
Graves' disease is a disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the thyroid gland and causes it to make too much of the hormone thyroxine. Because the thyroid gland regulates the body's metabolism, weight, energy, mood and organ functions can be affected when there is a problem. Dr. Asha Thomas, an internal medicine specialist at Sinai Hospital with a sub-specialty in endocrinology and metabolism, writes about the condition. * Graves' disease can develop in anyone at any age, but it develops most often in women after the age of 20. A family history of thyroid disease is associated with increased incidence of Graves' disease.
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NEWS
October 19, 2009
Graves' disease is a disorder in which the body's immune system mistakenly attacks the thyroid gland and causes it to make too much of the hormone thyroxine. Because the thyroid gland regulates the body's metabolism, weight, energy, mood and organ functions can be affected when there is a problem. Dr. Asha Thomas, an internal medicine specialist at Sinai Hospital with a sub-specialty in endocrinology and metabolism, writes about the condition. * Graves' disease can develop in anyone at any age, but it develops most often in women after the age of 20. A family history of thyroid disease is associated with increased incidence of Graves' disease.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Katherine Dunn and Lem Satterfield and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2001
Jerome Featherstone Sr. was happy that his son, a wrestler for Boys' Latin, was sick with a cold last weekend. Not that he was glad his son was ill, just that it was only a cold and not a side effect of Jerome Jr.'s bigger problem, a thyroid disorder called Graves' disease. The Featherstones said Dr. William Valente of Mercy Medical Center, considered one of the nation's leading endocrinologists, first diagnosed their son as having the disease in mid-November. It is characterized by an enlarged thyroid, a rapid pulse and an increased metabolism.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1998
Hoping to spare others the medical run-around she once endured, Kelly G. Ripken has established an education and referral program for people suffering from Graves' disease and other thyroid disorders.Ripken, the wife of Orioles legend Cal Ripken Jr., will serve as co-director of a program at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Initial funding is a $250,000 donation from the Kelly & Cal Ripken Foundation.With this program, people can make a phone call to speak to someone who will find answers to questions about thyroid disorders.
SPORTS
By Lem Satterfield and Katherine Dunn and Lem Satterfield and Katherine Dunn,SUN STAFF | February 9, 2001
Jerome Featherstone Sr. was happy that his son, a wrestler for Boys' Latin, was sick with a cold last weekend. Not that he was glad his son was ill, just that it was only a cold and not a side effect of Jerome Jr.'s bigger problem, a thyroid disorder called Graves' disease. The Featherstones said Dr. William Valente of Mercy Medical Center, considered one of the nation's leading endocrinologists, first diagnosed their son as having the disease in mid-November. It is characterized by an enlarged thyroid, a rapid pulse and an increased metabolism.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | April 12, 1992
There's The Story . . . the fairy-tale account of how an autographed napkin and a mother playing Cupid helped bring Kelly and Cal Ripken Jr. together; then there's the lesser-known tale of what took place six months later.The latter begins not with Once upon a time but with a line from Dickens: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times . . .Kelly had just returned from an idyllic trip to Japan with the Orioles in 1984. She and her boyfriend, baseball superstar Cal Ripken Jr., had discussed getting engaged as they waited in a Tokyo airport.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | May 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A medical mystery is still unfolding at the White House.President Bush, like his wife, Barbara, has received a diagnosis of Graves' disease, an autoimmune ailment of unknown cause. It is rare enough for a husband and wife to contract the disease, which is not known to be communicable. Even more odd is that Millie, the Bushes' dog, also has an autoimmune disease, lupus.The president's disease was diagnosed this month, the first lady's in January 1990, and Millie's last summer.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | August 7, 1992
Although heartened by Gail Devers' gold-medal comeback in the women's 100-meter race and near-miss in yesterday's 100-meter hurdles, physicians specializing in thyroid conditions say they are perplexed and disturbed by her account of her battle against Graves' disease. Some of the pieces, they say, just don't compute.In particular, they say it is virtually impossible that the radioactive iodine she took to quell her overactive thyroid caused her feet to become so swollen and inflamed that doctors considered cutting them off.They don't doubt that Devers had severe foot problems.
NEWS
By N.Y. Times News Service | May 28, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A medical mystery is unfolding at the White House.President Bush, like his wife, Barbara, has received a diagnosis of Graves' disease, an autoimmune ailment of unknown cause. It is rare enough for a husband and wife to contract the disease, which is not known to be communicable. Even odder is that Millie, the Bushes' dog, also has an autoimmune disease, known as lupus.The president's disease was diagnosed this month, the first lady's in January 1990, and Millie's last summer.
NEWS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,SUN STAFF | February 11, 1998
Hoping to spare others the medical run-around she once endured, Kelly G. Ripken has established an education and referral program for people suffering from Graves' disease and other thyroid disorders.Ripken, the wife of Orioles legend Cal Ripken Jr., will serve as co-director of a program at Johns Hopkins Hospital. Initial funding is a $250,000 donation from the Kelly & Cal Ripken Foundation.With this program, people can make a phone call to speak to someone who will find answers to questions about thyroid disorders.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1997
A former assistant professor at the University of Maryland School of Medicine filed a $1.1 million federal lawsuit against the university yesterday, accusing officials of discriminating against her because of her disabilities.Dr. Barbara Miller, an instructor in the medical school's radiology department from August 1992 to January 1996, alleges in the suit that officials refused to allow her to work part time after she suffered congestive heart failure and was diagnosed with Graves' disease -- a condition in which the thyroid gland enlarges and produces too much thyroid hormone, causing anxiety and restlessness, palpitations and weight loss.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 12, 1996
I recently developed Graves' disease and have been having problems with my eyes. They seem to "bulge," and are quite irritated and puffy. What causes these symptoms? Will they go away once my thyroid is treated? What can be done for my eyes?In Graves' disease, a common disorder, the thyroid gland enlarges and produces too much thyroid hormone, a condition called hyperthyroidism. With it comes anxiety and restlessness; palpitations; weight loss despite an increased appetite and food intake; excessive sweating and intolerance to heat; tremors of the fingers; fatigue and muscle weakness; and diarrhea or an increased number of bowel movements.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 17, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- After many years of suffering with an autoimmune disease called lupus, Virginia Ladd realized that no one was focusing attention on things she had learned the hard way:* That autoimmune disorders -- in which the immune system attacks the body's own tissue -- often run in families.* That they mostly strike women.* That they are as widespread and life-threatening as cancer and heart disease, yet many sufferers are initially dismissed as whiners and hypochondriacs."Unfortunately, physicians rarely take a family history of autoimmune diseases," said Ms. Ladd, 54. "I had an aunt who died with lupus at age 45. She was diagnosed through an autopsy.
SPORTS
By Jonathan Bor and Jonathan Bor,Staff Writer | August 7, 1992
Although heartened by Gail Devers' gold-medal comeback in the women's 100-meter race and near-miss in yesterday's 100-meter hurdles, physicians specializing in thyroid conditions say they are perplexed and disturbed by her account of her battle against Graves' disease. Some of the pieces, they say, just don't compute.In particular, they say it is virtually impossible that the radioactive iodine she took to quell her overactive thyroid caused her feet to become so swollen and inflamed that doctors considered cutting them off.They don't doubt that Devers had severe foot problems.
NEWS
By Ken Rosenthal and Ken Rosenthal,Staff Writer | August 2, 1992
BARCELONA, Spain -- Eighteen months ago, her feet were nearly amputated. Yesterday, those same feet carried Gail Devers to the Olympic gold medal in the race that ordained her the fastest woman on earth.The American medical community isn't going to enjoy hearing the story of Devers. For two years, doctors misdiagnosed her life-threatening thyroid problem, and Devers said it was "a miracle" she recovered to win the women's Olympic 100 meters.Devers, 25, endured breathing difficulties, migraine headaches and temporary loss of vision before learning she was suffering from Graves disease in September 1990.
NEWS
By Peter Honey and Peter Honey,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 29, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Doctors have ordered analyses of the water zTC supplies at the White House and other presidential and vice presidential residences to see whether they contain chemicals that may have triggered the thyroid disease afflicting both President Bush and his wife, Barbara.Presidential spokesman Marlin Fitzwater said yesterday that the White House had also asked a specialist to review the Bush family's medical history and to check for any link between the first couple's autoimmune ailment, Graves' disease, and another autoimmune disease, lupus, contracted by their dog, Millie.
NEWS
By PAUL W. LADENSON and NEIL SOLOMON | May 12, 1991
It is an extraordinary coincidence that both President and Mrs. Bush have had overactive thyroid glands, a condition called hyperthyroidism that affects about one out of 100 Americans. They have the most common kind of hyperthyroidism, a condition called Graves' disease, named after the Irish doctor who described it more than a century ago.In this disease, the body's immune system turns against the thyroid gland, inflames it and causes it to produce too much thyroid hormone. These hormones are chemicals that travel in blood throughout the body to regulate our metabolism and the performance of many organs, including the heart.
FEATURES
By Mary Corey and Mary Corey,Staff Writer | April 12, 1992
There's The Story . . . the fairy-tale account of how an autographed napkin and a mother playing Cupid helped bring Kelly and Cal Ripken Jr. together; then there's the lesser-known tale of what took place six months later.The latter begins not with Once upon a time but with a line from Dickens: It was the best of times, it was the worst of times . . .Kelly had just returned from an idyllic trip to Japan with the Orioles in 1984. She and her boyfriend, baseball superstar Cal Ripken Jr., had discussed getting engaged as they waited in a Tokyo airport.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | December 31, 1991
I suppose it's only right to start out extolling the virtue of the Twins and Braves, Cal Ripken, the exciting Super Bowl last January, Michael Jordan, the Duke basketball team, the Redskins and those other headline hogs.But that would be too easy. And, besides, those events, teams and people are the things that will stick in our minds until another 12 months come and go and it's time to reflect once again.Running the soon to perish 1991 back over the cockles of the mind, these are the folks, feats and festivities that fall into the front row, ready for re-inspection:* Pat Bradley.
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