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NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2000
With five children nearing driving age and a growing construction business, Frank and Maria DiFatta knew they needed a house with a wide driveway. In 1992, they bought a wooded 30-acre parcel on a gravel road north of Westminster and built their dream home. They were unaware, however, of the beating their vehicles would face - broken windshields, faulty steering and punctured tires - from the sharp stones that cover Leppo Road. "People think dirt roads are charming," said Maria DiFatta.
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NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | April 1, 2007
Liz Budge relishes the rustic quality of the dirt road that leads to her family's tree-shaded home in Union Mills. She worries that a county plan to pave Turkeyfoot Road will bring more traffic at higher speeds. On the other hand, her husband, Randy, eagerly awaits saying goodbye to gravel. The dust and dirt from the road sully his car, and the gravel washes away during rainstorms, making the road prone to potholes. "They do more maintenance down here than they would have to if they pave it," Randy Budge said, looking down at Turkeyfoot Road from his steep driveway.
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FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 6, 1999
If you were to look up the term "critics' darling" in the dictionary, odds are you'd find a photo of Lucinda Williams.A singer and songwriter whose specialty is literate, emotionally charged country rock, Williams (who performs at Shriver Hall Sunday) has been making records for just over two decades now. Not that the average pop fan would know; of the six albums she's recorded, only one -- last year's "Car Wheels on a Gravel Road" -- ever cracked the Billboard album chart.In fact, the closest she ever came to making a dent in the mainstream was in 1993, when Mary Chapin Carpenter cut a version of her song "Passionate Kisses."
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 5, 2006
Leonardtown -- These days, Maryland's front line of defense against an invasion of the deadly bird flu looks, quite literally, like a wild goose chase. On foot, in trucks and by boat, a team of biologists from the Department of Natural Resources is swooping down on flocks of geese to test them for avian influenza, specifically Asian H5N1, a strain that has caused the death of more than 100 people and millions of birds overseas. Wildlife experts suspect that if the deadly form of the virus enters this country, it will most likely be through birds that mingle in the arctic during the breeding season before returning to their wintering grounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2002
JEFFERSON - There is a road in Frederick County, a gravel road that begins where development ends, and on this road, traffic does not slow people down. On this road, chipmunks slow people, as they scamper from the safety of one overgrown ditch to another. Squirrels slow people, crossing the road, their cheeks stuffed with black walnuts for winter. In the sky above this road, there are no hovering helicopters monitoring speed, no TV sky patrols reporting conditions, only the glide of a red-tailed hawk sailing through the dappled canopy of hardwoods.
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Staff Writer | May 28, 1993
Carroll equestrians can take to the trails June 5 to celebrate the country's first observance of National Trails Day.The Carroll County Equestrian Council plans guided trail rides at Gillis Falls Park in South Carroll and the Union Mills Reservoir area in the northern county.It also is coordinating a cleanup day at the Morgan Run Natural Environment Area.The county Department of Recreation and Parks is helping plan the activities.All of the events are part of a nationwide effort to focus attention on public trails.
NEWS
By CANDUS THOMSON and CANDUS THOMSON,SUN REPORTER | July 5, 2006
Leonardtown -- These days, Maryland's front line of defense against an invasion of the deadly bird flu looks, quite literally, like a wild goose chase. On foot, in trucks and by boat, a team of biologists from the Department of Natural Resources is swooping down on flocks of geese to test them for avian influenza, specifically Asian H5N1, a strain that has caused the death of more than 100 people and millions of birds overseas. Wildlife experts suspect that if the deadly form of the virus enters this country, it will most likely be through birds that mingle in the arctic during the breeding season before returning to their wintering grounds.
NEWS
By Celestine Sibley | August 14, 1992
IT'S quiet and unbelievably cool down my country roads these mornings.You have to start early to get it at its best, and I've settled on 6:30 a.m. before the world is fully awake and what Job called "God's eyelid," the sun, is not open.I see the sun usually when it begins to glow over the tree tops down at the end of the road. But it's still in a benign mood, color contained in that orange disk, cool and distant, and it graciously waits till my walk is over before it floods the Earth with light -- and heat.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and By James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2003
Barbara Mills lives in Rhode Island now, a thinker's remove from the past half century's strife and change in Maryland. But her home was here, in those times while much of the white population strove, and failed, to go on keeping the black population in subjugation. She was a leader in the group called CORE as, finally, choking on its own venom, segregation died. So long a reign it had had here, so smooth and powerful and unjust; so broad -- segregation in voting, education, commerce, jobs, government, housing, recreation, the professions.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
The Carroll County commissioners asked yesterday for a comprehensive study of the county's gravel roads to assess the need and cost of paving them.The board also voted to keep paving projects for Leppo and Turkeyfoot roads alive for the 2004 and 2005 capital improvement budgets.Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge called for a comprehensive plan to address the gravel roads instead of "piecemeal" solutions.Commissioner Donald I. Dell agreed: "We need to have a more detailed plan." He estimated the cost of paving all gravel roads could cost as much as $10 million.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | September 10, 2003
Debbie Peyok couldn't drive her vintage Mustangs without scratching them or getting dust all over their custom paint jobs. Maria DiFatta spent thousands to replace blown tires, fix cracked windshields and realign the front ends on her family's vehicles. Dust coated their homes. The culprit? The gravel that covered the road in front of their northern Carroll County houses. Carroll County went a decade without paving any of its 92 miles of gravel roads. But a few years ago, the two women began hounding officials - in DiFatta's case, even tossing a shredded tire on the floor of a county office.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 28, 2003
The Carroll commissioners approved a plan yesterday to begin paving the busiest stretches of the county's 92 miles of gravel road. The commissioners have included about $500,000 in their 2004 budget to pave gravel roads. This summer, Leppo Road in northern Carroll will be the first to be paved, said Benton Watson, director of the county's bureau of roads. Road workers will be using a new paving technique, Watson says, and if the Leppo Road project goes well, they will proceed on other busy stretches of gravel.
ENTERTAINMENT
By James H. Bready and By James H. Bready,Special to the Sun | February 16, 2003
Barbara Mills lives in Rhode Island now, a thinker's remove from the past half century's strife and change in Maryland. But her home was here, in those times while much of the white population strove, and failed, to go on keeping the black population in subjugation. She was a leader in the group called CORE as, finally, choking on its own venom, segregation died. So long a reign it had had here, so smooth and powerful and unjust; so broad -- segregation in voting, education, commerce, jobs, government, housing, recreation, the professions.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Larry Bingham and Larry Bingham,SUN STAFF | September 22, 2002
JEFFERSON - There is a road in Frederick County, a gravel road that begins where development ends, and on this road, traffic does not slow people down. On this road, chipmunks slow people, as they scamper from the safety of one overgrown ditch to another. Squirrels slow people, crossing the road, their cheeks stuffed with black walnuts for winter. In the sky above this road, there are no hovering helicopters monitoring speed, no TV sky patrols reporting conditions, only the glide of a red-tailed hawk sailing through the dappled canopy of hardwoods.
NEWS
By Brenda J. Buote and Brenda J. Buote,SUN STAFF | October 10, 2000
With five children nearing driving age and a growing construction business, Frank and Maria DiFatta knew they needed a house with a wide driveway. In 1992, they bought a wooded 30-acre parcel on a gravel road north of Westminster and built their dream home. They were unaware, however, of the beating their vehicles would face - broken windshields, faulty steering and punctured tires - from the sharp stones that cover Leppo Road. "People think dirt roads are charming," said Maria DiFatta.
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | May 6, 1999
If you were to look up the term "critics' darling" in the dictionary, odds are you'd find a photo of Lucinda Williams.A singer and songwriter whose specialty is literate, emotionally charged country rock, Williams (who performs at Shriver Hall Sunday) has been making records for just over two decades now. Not that the average pop fan would know; of the six albums she's recorded, only one -- last year's "Car Wheels on a Gravel Road" -- ever cracked the Billboard album chart.In fact, the closest she ever came to making a dent in the mainstream was in 1993, when Mary Chapin Carpenter cut a version of her song "Passionate Kisses."
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
For many residents, Carroll's 90 miles of unpaved roads recall the county's rural heritage. But for residents who travel them every day, they are bumpy, dirty reminders of how tough life can be without blacktop.Yesterday, the county commissioners asked for a comprehensive study of Carroll's gravel roads to assess the need and cost of paving them.The board also voted to keep paving projects for Leppo and Turkeyfoot roads, two of the county's most troublesome gravel roads, alive for the 2004 and 2005 capital improvement budgets.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | April 1, 2007
Liz Budge relishes the rustic quality of the dirt road that leads to her family's tree-shaded home in Union Mills. She worries that a county plan to pave Turkeyfoot Road will bring more traffic at higher speeds. On the other hand, her husband, Randy, eagerly awaits saying goodbye to gravel. The dust and dirt from the road sully his car, and the gravel washes away during rainstorms, making the road prone to potholes. "They do more maintenance down here than they would have to if they pave it," Randy Budge said, looking down at Turkeyfoot Road from his steep driveway.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
The Carroll County commissioners asked yesterday for a comprehensive study of the county's gravel roads to assess the need and cost of paving them.The board also voted to keep paving projects for Leppo and Turkeyfoot roads alive for the 2004 and 2005 capital improvement budgets.Commissioner Julia Walsh Gouge called for a comprehensive plan to address the gravel roads instead of "piecemeal" solutions.Commissioner Donald I. Dell agreed: "We need to have a more detailed plan." He estimated the cost of paving all gravel roads could cost as much as $10 million.
NEWS
By John Murphy and John Murphy,SUN STAFF | February 10, 1999
For many residents, Carroll's 90 miles of unpaved roads recall the county's rural heritage. But for residents who travel them every day, they are bumpy, dirty reminders of how tough life can be without blacktop.Yesterday, the county commissioners asked for a comprehensive study of Carroll's gravel roads to assess the need and cost of paving them.The board also voted to keep paving projects for Leppo and Turkeyfoot roads, two of the county's most troublesome gravel roads, alive for the 2004 and 2005 capital improvement budgets.
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