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NEWS
By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Staff writer | March 24, 1991
A Fallston company has been denied zoning approval to start tree grinding and gravel excavation operations at a 56-acre site on Mountain Road near Joppa.In a 56-page ruling issued Tuesday, county ZoningHearing Examiner William F. Casey rejected a request by T.C. Simons Inc. for seven special zoning exceptions and variances to start the operations on the site.Simons, a construction and contracting company established in 1972, wanted to set up the tree grinding and gravel extraction operations on two tracts along both sides of Mountain Road near Singer Road.
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NEWS
Letter to The Aegis | March 4, 2014
Editor: As a long time resident of Harford County, I am proud of the beautiful parks and outdoor amenities that are available to the public. I enjoy hiking in the Rocks, biking with my children, play dates at Annie's Playground and running with my dog, Molly, on the Ma and Pa Trail. As spring approaches, I am excited to get outside every day that I can and enjoy all that Harford County has to offer. However, year after year, I am hugely disappointed in the maintenance and upkeep of one of Harford County's treasures" the Ma & Pa Trail.
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NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | March 20, 1991
Anne Arundel's sand and gravel operators say they face financial ruin if the County Council doesn't soften a tough new bill governing the excavation industry.Representatives of the county's 31 sand and gravel firms who packed the council chambers Monday night said they will support the new county regulations -- if the council makes key changes regarding the permitting process, hours of operation and the kind of machinery that can be used on site."It's a very tough bill," said William Natter, president of Natter Services Inc., an Annapolis sand and gravel firm.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2010
"Operating a vehicle" refers only to what a motorist does behind the wheel, Maryland's highest court ruled Tuesday, as it upheld an appeals court decision that overturned the vehicular manslaughter conviction of a truck driver whose accidental gravel spill on a Harford County road caused a fatal crash in 2005. Kevin G. DiGennaro of Dundalk was convicted of vehicular manslaughter after a car driven by Heather Sandmeier skidded on the gravel into oncoming traffic. Sandmeier's son Devon, 7, was killed in the crash.
NEWS
By Sheridan Lyons and Sheridan Lyons,SUN STAFF | February 26, 1996
Godfrey Larry "G.L." Stancill, who began a sand-and-gravel business out of a bushelbasket and donated his services to build a Havre de Grace sports complex that bears his name, died Friday of heart failure at his home near Joppa. He was 83.Mr. Stancill was president of his company, Stancill's Inc., until the mid-1980s and still tended some real estate, said a son, Larry G. Stancill of Joppa. Several sons run the business, which has offices in Bel Air and its primary pit in Perryville.Born in Tarboro, N.C., Mr. Stancill left grade school to chop cotton and pick tobacco.
NEWS
By John A. Morris and John A. Morris,Staff Writer | February 24, 1993
An asphalt manufacturer, seeking permission to expand its 35-year-old gravel mining business, insisted yesterday it has answered the noise and traffic concerns of its Gambrills neighbors.But residents told a county hearing officer that they still oppose the request by BBSS Inc., which operates the Reliable Asphalt plant at Route 3 and Brickhead Road, to mine another 72 acres between Brickhead and Evergreen roads.Willis Montgomery, 70, who lives on Evergreen Road, complained that his community is being encircled by "these big holes," referring to BBSS' existing 130-acre sand and gravel operation and other mines in the vicinity.
NEWS
By Nora Achrati and Nora Achrati,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2002
Residents of an East Baltimore neighborhood and managers of a gravel-processing plant are involved in a long-running battle over what the residents say is excessive dust, noise and traffic from Baltimore Aggregate Recycling Co. Some in East Baltimore are calling for the shutdown of the plant, which opened on Edison Highway in 1998. It processes truckloads of broken concrete, bricks and asphalt from torn-down buildings into gravel and cement-base for highway and construction projects. Residents "can't raise their windows.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Evening Sun Staff | October 1, 1991
About 300 Havre de Grace-area residents turned out last night to restate their opposition to the proposed Gravel Hill rubble landfill, whose fate is the subject of two court cases.Much of the public hearing before officials of the MarylandDepartment of the Environment, who must decide whether to issue two state permits for the project, was taken up by consultants from both sides using the technical jargon of geologists.The bottom line of all the talk about "K factors," "conductivity of aquifers" and "leachate migration" was that the company that wants to build the landfill, Maryland Reclamation Associates of Churchville, contends it can operate the site without polluting private wells nearby or causing them to run dry.Conversely, consultants for the opponents contend that Maryland Reclamation's studies are flawed.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 17, 1996
ROSCOE, N.Y. - The flood that swamped the western Catskills last January seemed insatiable, plucking trees out by their roots, plunging bridges into streams, wrecking homes and stores and leaving eight people dead.No one in this countryside famed for its 2-foot wild trout could remember anything like it, and federal officials declared the flood the state's worst calamity in 24 years.Here and in the other mountain villages in Delaware and Sullivan counties just beyond the Borscht Belt, people set to work, with the gritty resourcefulness that is a point of native pride and with $8.3 million in federal and state emergency money.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2010
An Eastern Shore country club accused of polluting the Choptank River and a Laurel gravel pit targeted for development are among 25 businesses and individuals fined a total of $1.6 million recently for alleged pollution violations, the Maryland Department of the Environment announced Monday. The state filed suit in June against BSJ Partners LLC charging that Clearview at Horn's Point, formerly the Cambridge Country Club, has been illegally discharging sewage from its on-site septic system into the Choptank, a Chesapeake Bay tributary.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | August 9, 2010
An Eastern Shore country club accused of polluting the Choptank River and a Laurel gravel pit targeted for development are among 25 businesses and individuals fined a total of $1.6 million recently for alleged pollution violations, the Maryland Department of the Environment announced Monday. The state filed suit in June against BSJ Partners LLC charging that Clearview at Horn's Point, formerly the Cambridge Country Club, has been illegally discharging sewage from its on-site septic system into the Choptank, a Chesapeake Bay tributary.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Andrea.siegel@baltsun.com | September 4, 2009
Maryland's highest court heard arguments Thursday in a case that could decide how far responsibility for a fatal car crash extends. At issue is what it means to operate a vehicle, and whether that refers only to what a driver does behind the wheel or if it includes other actions - in this case, what a driver did after spilling more than 11/2 tons of gravel on a Harford County road. The case, the first time the top court is being asked the question, stems from the death of a 7-year-old boy whose mother's car skidded on the gravel and spun into an oncoming car. Lawyers for the attorney general's office are asking the Court of Appeals to rule that the driver who spilled the gravel is guilty of vehicular manslaughter because he should have marked the area to warn traffic or indicated a need for prompt cleanup.
NEWS
October 30, 2008
Ex-state worker admits stealing $1.8 million A former Maryland state employee pleaded guilty yesterday to stealing nearly $1.8 million from a state health department kidney disease program. Maryland Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler says the former employee, Donna McRae Lam, took the money from the department's program in a scheme that lasted more than a decade. Gansler's office says that Lam added 14 fictitious health care providers to the program's computer system and filed 917 fake claims for payment.
NEWS
September 9, 2007
We conclude this season's Gardener of the Week feature with Tom Blanford, an employee for the National Education Association in Washington. When he moved into his rowhouse three years ago, he confronted a back yard of bare gravel surrounded by a chain-link fence. Today it is an Asian-inspired retreat from the noise and bustle of the city. You can read about his garden and see more pictures tomorrow at baltimoresun.com/gardener. To read a complete calendar of the home and garden events for this month, go to baltimoresun.
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,Sun Reporter | April 1, 2007
Liz Budge relishes the rustic quality of the dirt road that leads to her family's tree-shaded home in Union Mills. She worries that a county plan to pave Turkeyfoot Road will bring more traffic at higher speeds. On the other hand, her husband, Randy, eagerly awaits saying goodbye to gravel. The dust and dirt from the road sully his car, and the gravel washes away during rainstorms, making the road prone to potholes. "They do more maintenance down here than they would have to if they pave it," Randy Budge said, looking down at Turkeyfoot Road from his steep driveway.
SPORTS
By KATIE CARRERA and KATIE CARRERA,SUN REPORTER | August 3, 2006
Travis Pastrana sat in his Davidsonville home munching on a banana and finishing off a bottle of Gatorade. He had just performed several tricks on his motorcycle for a photo shoot and was remarkably calm considering he was barely a week away from this year's X Games. His new tricks were ready, he was healthy after a number of injuries and the defending freestyle motocross gold medalist was at ease. However, Pastrana was excited to talk about his newest passion and the other sport he will compete in this weekend at X Games 12 in Los Angeles -- rally car racing.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | November 19, 2003
When Joe Spero walked into his cardiac rehabilitation class at Howard County General Hospital, the 51-year-old Vietnam veteran had no doubt that he'd be the youngest in the room. Then he saw John Gravel working out with the other heart patients, some of whom are more than 60 years older than the athletic college student, who at age 21 has undergone six heart surgeries to repair congenital defects. "I thought he was in high school," said Spero, who has suffered two heart attacks. "When I heard what his problem was, it humbled me. We see somebody like him that's been fighting all along, and it motivates all of us."
SPORTS
By Drake Witham and Drake Witham,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 10, 1996
Growing up in Rhode Island, Rick Gravel had to go just to the frozen lake behind his family's home to play hockey.Frozen lakes may be a rarity in Maryland, but the 31-year-old Greenbelt resident has found a reservoir of people interested in roller hockey."
SPORTS
April 18, 2006
Checking my mail, I see that my friend in Japan, Taka, wants to know who's funnier, Peter Schmuck or Rick Maese. The answer: me. I'd venture to say that most men cried at the end of Field of Dreams. It's OK to admit it. Now, if you broke down during Major League II, then you've got some issues. Brian's Song is the first movie I can remember that made me cry. The music had a lot to do with it. I still can't hear it without tensing up and pretending that I have something in my eye. I can remember playing catch with my dad in the backyard.
NEWS
By JAMIE STIEHM and JAMIE STIEHM,SUN REPORTER | February 8, 2006
The Navy has received a half-dozen expressions of interest in the Naval Academy's dairy farm property, including proposals for a sand and gravel mine and an organic farming operation, in addition to the horse park plan put forth by the Maryland Stadium Authority. Navy officials sought outside interest after the stadium authority designated the 857-acre Gambrills tract last fall as its preferred site for a proposed horse park. A Navy spokesman declined to identify the six parties that have expressed interest, but four of them confirmed their responses to The Sun. Warren E. "Cookie" Halle, head of Silver Spring-based Halle Enterprises, confirmed that he responded to the Navy's request.
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