Advertisement
HomeCollectionsGravano
IN THE NEWS

Gravano

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Newsday | March 19, 1992
NEW YORK -- Members of New York's Genovese crime family tTC and a member of another crime family discussed killing Gambino mob turncoat Salvatore Gravano's wife and two children, according to a wide-ranging racketeering indictment.Gravano, 47, recently completed nine days of testimony as the government's star witness against alleged Gambino boss John Gotti, on trial in Brooklyn federal court on murder and racketeering charges. The government expects to wind up its case tomorrow.The indictment unsealed yesterday in Newark, N.J., charges that on Jan. 22, while meeting in Boston, two reputed Genovese members and a capo in the Patriarca family discussed killing Gravano's wife, Debra, and their two teen-age children, Gerard, 19, and Karen, 16.A long-standing crime family rule prohibits harming women and children.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 1997
NEW YORK -- Salvatore Gravano, the former mob killer who has become a major government witness against the Mafia, told a federal jury in Brooklyn yesterday that he had been paid about $250,000 for a best-selling book about his bloody career and hoped to earn as much as $1 million more from a possible movie deal.The revelation came during Gravano's testimony as the star prosecution witness in the murder and racketeering trial of Vincent Gigante, who is accused of heading the powerful Genovese crime family.
Advertisement
NEWS
By New York Times | March 10, 1992
NEW YORK -- A defense lawyer scornfully attacked the credibility of Salvatore Gravano yesterday, challenging his testimony that four gunmen all wore white raincoats and Russian fur hats when they killed Paul Castellano.But Gravano, a Mafia turncoat testifying as the prosecution's main witness against John Gotti, stuck to his story.He recalled planning the murder of Castellano, whom he depicted as the boss of the Gambino crime family, and said he and Gotti met with the team of gunmen in a park shortly before the slaying on Dec. 16, 1985.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | April 27, 1997
Of course, virtually everything of significance that is seen on film or on television, except for live events, comes from books, including play scripts. The interplay between those forms is rich and ceaseless, both commercially and esthetically. Television, a vapid flickering shadow without books to lead it, propels book sales to the stratosphere. Movies, certain book-based movies, proffer such verisimilitude as to send their subjects into ecstasies of empathy.Today's case in point: the publication and promotion of "Underboss: Sammy The Bull Gravano's Story of Life in the Mafia," by Peter Maas (HarperCollins.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | March 12, 1992
NEW YORK -- Turncoat underboss Salvatore "Sammy Bull" Gravano killed his brother-in-law, then attended a funeral "for the hand" because the victim was dismembered and other body parts were never found.The chilling story was disclosed at the John Gotti trial yesterday by Anthony Cardinale, a lawyer for Gotti's co-defendant, but the jury never got to hear it because the judge ruled it too inflammatory.The victim was Gravano's wife's 22-year-old brother, Nick Scibetta, who was murdered in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, in 1978.
NEWS
March 4, 1992
NEW YORK -- John Gotti made sure the job got done right when Mafia boss "Big Paul" Castellano was assassinated, driving slowly past the bullet-riddled body to make sure he was dead, Gotti's former right-hand man testified.Salvatore "Sammy Bull" Gravano described the 1985 hit during his second day on the stand Tuesday at Gotti's murder-racketeering trial.Prosecutors allege Gotti orchestrated the slaying of Castellano and his bodyguard, Thomas Bilotti, outside Sparks Steak House in Manhattan to seize control of the Gambino family, the nation's most powerful crime organization.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | March 13, 1992
NEW YORK -- A four-person team of federal prosecutors had their own stare-down with John Gotti yesterday after their star witness and birthday boy, Salvatore Gravano, testified that when Gotti barked, Sammy Bull bit.While Gravano, who turned 47 yesterday, and the jury were out of the courtroom on a break, the prosecutors lined up in a row against the jury-box railing and, with ironic smiles, stared at Gotti.Gotti, who has engaged his former underboss in similar displays of will, stared right back at John Gleeson and Assistant Prosecutors Laura Ward, Patrick Cotter and James Orenstein.
NEWS
By MICHAEL PAKENHAM | April 27, 1997
Of course, virtually everything of significance that is seen on film or on television, except for live events, comes from books, including play scripts. The interplay between those forms is rich and ceaseless, both commercially and esthetically. Television, a vapid flickering shadow without books to lead it, propels book sales to the stratosphere. Movies, certain book-based movies, proffer such verisimilitude as to send their subjects into ecstasies of empathy.Today's case in point: the publication and promotion of "Underboss: Sammy The Bull Gravano's Story of Life in the Mafia," by Peter Maas (HarperCollins.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | July 11, 1997
NEW YORK -- Salvatore Gravano, the former mob killer who has become a major government witness against the Mafia, told a federal jury in Brooklyn yesterday that he had been paid about $250,000 for a best-selling book about his bloody career and hoped to earn as much as $1 million more from a possible movie deal.The revelation came during Gravano's testimony as the star prosecution witness in the murder and racketeering trial of Vincent Gigante, who is accused of heading the powerful Genovese crime family.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Former Mafia underboss Salvatore Gravano, known as "Sammy the Bull," testified before a Senate panel yesterday that the co-managers of former welterweight champion Buddy McGirt are "associates" of the Gambino crime family in New York.The hearings were the latest in a series on boxing corruption held by the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations.The two managers -- Al Certo and Stuart Weiner -- responded to the allegations with dramatically different comments.Certo passionately denied the charges, but Weiner, named as an unindicted co-conspirator on state racketeering charges last year in New York, pleaded the Fifth Amendment to every question posed by the panel.
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | April 2, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Former Mafia underboss Salvatore Gravano, known as "Sammy the Bull," testified before a Senate panel yesterday that the co-managers of former welterweight champion Buddy McGirt are "associates" of the Gambino crime family in New York.The hearings were the latest in a series on boxing corruption held by the Senate Permanent Subcommittee on Investigations.The two managers -- Al Certo and Stuart Weiner -- responded to the allegations with dramatically different comments.Certo passionately denied the charges, but Weiner, named as an unindicted co-conspirator on state racketeering charges last year in New York, pleaded the Fifth Amendment to every question posed by the panel.
NEWS
By Newsday | March 19, 1992
NEW YORK -- Members of New York's Genovese crime family tTC and a member of another crime family discussed killing Gambino mob turncoat Salvatore Gravano's wife and two children, according to a wide-ranging racketeering indictment.Gravano, 47, recently completed nine days of testimony as the government's star witness against alleged Gambino boss John Gotti, on trial in Brooklyn federal court on murder and racketeering charges. The government expects to wind up its case tomorrow.The indictment unsealed yesterday in Newark, N.J., charges that on Jan. 22, while meeting in Boston, two reputed Genovese members and a capo in the Patriarca family discussed killing Gravano's wife, Debra, and their two teen-age children, Gerard, 19, and Karen, 16.A long-standing crime family rule prohibits harming women and children.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
NEW YORK -- Maybe this "Teflon Don" John Gotti isn't so slick after all.How else to explain why he talked when he should have walked, why he trusted an underboss who turned rat, and why, no matter how expensive his suits and how silken his socks, the minute he opens his mouth he comes across like a high school tough who just discovered four-letter words?Yet this is the same John Gotti who has avoided jail terms three times in six years because prosecutors couldn't make the charges stick and who is reputed to have battled to the top of the Gambino crime family, reigning dynasty of the Mafia.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | March 13, 1992
NEW YORK -- A four-person team of federal prosecutors had their own stare-down with John Gotti yesterday after their star witness and birthday boy, Salvatore Gravano, testified that when Gotti barked, Sammy Bull bit.While Gravano, who turned 47 yesterday, and the jury were out of the courtroom on a break, the prosecutors lined up in a row against the jury-box railing and, with ironic smiles, stared at Gotti.Gotti, who has engaged his former underboss in similar displays of will, stared right back at John Gleeson and Assistant Prosecutors Laura Ward, Patrick Cotter and James Orenstein.
NEWS
By New York Daily News | March 12, 1992
NEW YORK -- Turncoat underboss Salvatore "Sammy Bull" Gravano killed his brother-in-law, then attended a funeral "for the hand" because the victim was dismembered and other body parts were never found.The chilling story was disclosed at the John Gotti trial yesterday by Anthony Cardinale, a lawyer for Gotti's co-defendant, but the jury never got to hear it because the judge ruled it too inflammatory.The victim was Gravano's wife's 22-year-old brother, Nick Scibetta, who was murdered in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn, in 1978.
NEWS
By New York Times | March 10, 1992
NEW YORK -- A defense lawyer scornfully attacked the credibility of Salvatore Gravano yesterday, challenging his testimony that four gunmen all wore white raincoats and Russian fur hats when they killed Paul Castellano.But Gravano, a Mafia turncoat testifying as the prosecution's main witness against John Gotti, stuck to his story.He recalled planning the murder of Castellano, whom he depicted as the boss of the Gambino crime family, and said he and Gotti met with the team of gunmen in a park shortly before the slaying on Dec. 16, 1985.
NEWS
By Boston Globe | January 21, 1992
NEW YORK -- The plate glass facade at Taormina restaurant, in Little Italy here, provides a wide, clear view of Mulberry Street, and for that reason, not to mention the decent food, John Gotti is fond of it.Because even though Gotti likes to be seen, whenever he sat down to eat with the man said to be his right arm he was more preoccupied with seeing who might want to approach.But as Gotti scanned the street outside for potential trouble, as did his bodyguards who stood at the bar nursing ice waters, he should have looked no farther than across the table, where Salvatore Gravano broke bread with his friend and mentor.
NEWS
By Dan Fesperman and Dan Fesperman,Staff Writer | March 15, 1992
NEW YORK -- Maybe this "Teflon Don" John Gotti isn't so slick after all.How else to explain why he talked when he should have walked, why he trusted an underboss who turned rat, and why, no matter how expensive his suits and how silken his socks, the minute he opens his mouth he comes across like a high school tough who just discovered four-letter words?Yet this is the same John Gotti who has avoided jail terms three times in six years because prosecutors couldn't make the charges stick and who is reputed to have battled to the top of the Gambino crime family, reigning dynasty of the Mafia.
NEWS
By New York Times | March 6, 1992
NEW YORK -- Firing questions with derision and disdain, a defense lawyer tore into Salvatore Gravano, attacking the character and credibility of the stoic Mafia turncoat who is the prosecution's crucial witness against John Gotti.On his first day of cross-examination yesterday, Gravano seemed coldly composed in general but a bit edgy at times as he leaned back in his seat and stared at his inquisitor, Albert J. Krieger, in the racketeering-murder trial at U.S. District Court in Brooklyn."When I was a kid, I was involved in gangs, dropped out of school in the eighth grade," Gravano said, explaining how he had begun a life of crime.
NEWS
March 4, 1992
NEW YORK -- John Gotti made sure the job got done right when Mafia boss "Big Paul" Castellano was assassinated, driving slowly past the bullet-riddled body to make sure he was dead, Gotti's former right-hand man testified.Salvatore "Sammy Bull" Gravano described the 1985 hit during his second day on the stand Tuesday at Gotti's murder-racketeering trial.Prosecutors allege Gotti orchestrated the slaying of Castellano and his bodyguard, Thomas Bilotti, outside Sparks Steak House in Manhattan to seize control of the Gambino family, the nation's most powerful crime organization.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.