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Gratin

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NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and Betty Rosbottom,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | March 26, 2000
When entertaining during this season, I try to plan what I call transitional meals. I blend hearty dishes redolent of winter with lighter ones. A good example of this type of menu is one I recently created. The main course will include orange-glazed roast pork tenderloin served with asparagus, plus a gratin of butternut squash with Gruyere cheese and rosemary. For the gratin, I saute chopped leeks and diced squash in a little butter and combine them in a baking pan. I add rosemary-scented cream to the dish and finally a topping of shredded Gruyere cheese.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2010
Asparagus is the early star of our farmers' markets. It will appear in abundance at the Baltimore Farmers' Market, which opens for the season Sunday. Asparagus is also the central player this week in a new Sun feature we're inviting you to participate in, called the Farmers' Market Challenge. The idea is to cook a dish that uses local ingredients sold in farmers' markets. In the weeks to come, we will publish recipes from readers who have met this challenge. You can upload yours at baltimoresun.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rob Kasper, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2010
Asparagus is the early star of our farmers' markets. It will appear in abundance at the Baltimore Farmers' Market, which opens for the season Sunday. Asparagus is also the central player this week in a new Sun feature we're inviting you to participate in, called the Farmers' Market Challenge. The idea is to cook a dish that uses local ingredients sold in farmers' markets. In the weeks to come, we will publish recipes from readers who have met this challenge. You can upload yours at baltimoresun.
NEWS
By Regina Schrambling and Regina Schrambling,Los Angeles Times | May 14, 2008
Gratins have a bit of seasonal affective disorder. They turn up in fall and winter but disappear when the sun comes back out in springtime. That is surprising considering how well everything at peak of green right now goes with cheese and sauce, and how easily a quick pass through the oven makes them all rich and bubbly together. Asparagus, artichokes, green garlic, dandelions, even not-so-green new potatoes can be transformed by the gratin treatment. The super-fresh aspect makes gratins especially tantalizing once you start to feel a little bored by the vegetables that tasted so new just weeks ago. A steamed artichoke is always a thing of satisfying beauty, but if you pare it to its heart, combine it with many more and bake them with green garlic and cheese, you get a whole new taste sensation.
NEWS
By Regina Schrambling and Regina Schrambling,Los Angeles Times | May 14, 2008
Gratins have a bit of seasonal affective disorder. They turn up in fall and winter but disappear when the sun comes back out in springtime. That is surprising considering how well everything at peak of green right now goes with cheese and sauce, and how easily a quick pass through the oven makes them all rich and bubbly together. Asparagus, artichokes, green garlic, dandelions, even not-so-green new potatoes can be transformed by the gratin treatment. The super-fresh aspect makes gratins especially tantalizing once you start to feel a little bored by the vegetables that tasted so new just weeks ago. A steamed artichoke is always a thing of satisfying beauty, but if you pare it to its heart, combine it with many more and bake them with green garlic and cheese, you get a whole new taste sensation.
FEATURES
By Ellen Hawks and Ellen Hawks,SUN STAFF | October 25, 2000
Nancy J. Wilson of Pasadena wrote that she was looking for a recipe she misplaced that used potatoes and Jarlsberg cheese. "I got the recipe, made it and people still talk about it. I would like it again." Jeanne Scheno of Baldwin responded with a recipe that tester Laura Reiley chose. Jarlsberg-Potato Gratin Serves 12 12 slices bacon 1 cup minced onion 1/2 cup butter, divided use 8 eggs, slightly beaten 2 1/2 cups freshly grated Jarlsberg cheese, divided use 1 1/2 cups whipping cream 1/4 cup snipped fresh parsley 2 teaspoons freshly grated nutmeg 1 teaspoon salt 1/2 teaspoon pepper 1 clove garlic, crushed 3 pounds potatoes (about 6 large)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | August 11, 2002
Once again this summer my husband and I found ourselves living and working in Paris for several weeks. We rented the same apartment with its tiny but efficient kitchen, and as soon as we had unpacked our bags, I was out the door with my bright red shopping cart. I couldn't wait to fill it with crisp, slender baguettes from the bakery, with beautiful fruits and vegetables from the neighborhood produce store, with favorite cheeses from the fromagerie and, of course, with sweet indulgences from the patisserie.
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | November 7, 2007
The sweet potato is an often-neglected spud, regularly pushed out of the culinary limelight by mashed potatoes, its renown not even close to that of the famous french fry. The sweet potato did not help its reputation when, for prior years, it regularly showed up at the supper table, tarted up, dotted with marshmallows and calling itself "candied." There was also the problem of being orange, not a fetching color. Despite these limitations, the sweet potato is, I think, a food this fella could fall for. The sweet potato happens to be a favorite of Deborah Madison.
NEWS
By Betty Hallock and Betty Hallock,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 2007
Parsnip and celery root are layered with nutmeg-laced cream and two kinds of cheese for this luscious gratin created by Ari Rosenson, chef de cuisine of Cut in Los Angeles. This recipe calls for a 9-inch gratin dish or deep-dish pie plate. Betty Hallock writes for the Los Angeles Times, which provided the recipe analysis. CELERY ROOT AND PARSNIP GRATIN Serves 8 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon finely chopped shallots 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy cream 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon milk 2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon finely ground black pepper 1 pinch nutmeg 2 large celery roots (about 2 1/2 pounds total)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | August 30, 2006
Some dishes turn your head with their texture; others win you over with their looks. This one grabbed me with its aroma. I was up on the third floor of our rowhouse when I caught my first whiff, a compelling mixture of tomatoes, peppers and onions. I quickly made my way down the stairs, inhaling my way toward the first-floor oven where the dish was baking. At the kitchen door I picked up scents of garlic. "Wow," I said to my wife who was working in the kitchen, "whatever that is, it smells wonderful."
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | November 7, 2007
The sweet potato is an often-neglected spud, regularly pushed out of the culinary limelight by mashed potatoes, its renown not even close to that of the famous french fry. The sweet potato did not help its reputation when, for prior years, it regularly showed up at the supper table, tarted up, dotted with marshmallows and calling itself "candied." There was also the problem of being orange, not a fetching color. Despite these limitations, the sweet potato is, I think, a food this fella could fall for. The sweet potato happens to be a favorite of Deborah Madison.
NEWS
By Betty Hallock and Betty Hallock,Los Angeles Times | January 7, 2007
Parsnip and celery root are layered with nutmeg-laced cream and two kinds of cheese for this luscious gratin created by Ari Rosenson, chef de cuisine of Cut in Los Angeles. This recipe calls for a 9-inch gratin dish or deep-dish pie plate. Betty Hallock writes for the Los Angeles Times, which provided the recipe analysis. CELERY ROOT AND PARSNIP GRATIN Serves 8 1 tablespoon butter 1 tablespoon finely chopped shallots 1 tablespoon finely chopped garlic 1/2 cup plus 2 tablespoons heavy cream 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon milk 2 teaspoons salt 1/2 teaspoon finely ground black pepper 1 pinch nutmeg 2 large celery roots (about 2 1/2 pounds total)
NEWS
By ROB KASPER | August 30, 2006
Some dishes turn your head with their texture; others win you over with their looks. This one grabbed me with its aroma. I was up on the third floor of our rowhouse when I caught my first whiff, a compelling mixture of tomatoes, peppers and onions. I quickly made my way down the stairs, inhaling my way toward the first-floor oven where the dish was baking. At the kitchen door I picked up scents of garlic. "Wow," I said to my wife who was working in the kitchen, "whatever that is, it smells wonderful."
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 12, 2006
Most of my friends are social creatures (just like my spouse and I) and love to entertain. However, when it's so hot outside that cooking an entire meal seems more like hard labor than pleasure, my fellow cooks and I often opt for preparing a meal together. We choose a menu, then each pick a course to make. I love this idea, because it means that I can concentrate on a single dish. For such a meal, I recently suggested that we begin with a chilled soup, followed by a grilled, butterflied leg of lamb plus sides, and a fruit tart for dessert.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | February 18, 2006
"When in doubt, serve meat and potatoes." That's a motto I embrace often when entertaining, if my guest list does not include vegetarians. My spouse, like countless others, swoons when he hears this combination mentioned. He likes almost any variation on the theme. Last month, he was delighted by a creamy potato gratin that I served with a leg of lamb on one occasion and with beef tenderloin on another. He even went off his diet and indulged in seconds. The rich gratin is a remake of a scalloped potato dish I created several years ago. In the original version, I topped layers of sliced potatoes with creme fraiche (a thick French cream that is a cross between heavy and sour cream)
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Jim Coleman,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 8, 2004
What's the difference between au gratin potatoes and scalloped potatoes, and do you have a recipe for au gratin potatoes? I have bought both in box form and I don't think there is a difference between the two. First things first: Put the boxes back on the shelf and walk away from that aisle in the store. Now that we can breathe easier, let's get to your question. Yes, there is a difference between au gratin and scalloped potatoes. The key difference is in the "au gratin" part, because that term refers to foods topped with bread crumbs or cheese and then browned in the oven.
NEWS
By Jim Coleman and Jim Coleman,Knight Ridder / Tribune | February 8, 2004
What's the difference between au gratin potatoes and scalloped potatoes, and do you have a recipe for au gratin potatoes? I have bought both in box form and I don't think there is a difference between the two. First things first: Put the boxes back on the shelf and walk away from that aisle in the store. Now that we can breathe easier, let's get to your question. Yes, there is a difference between au gratin and scalloped potatoes. The key difference is in the "au gratin" part, because that term refers to foods topped with bread crumbs or cheese and then browned in the oven.
FEATURES
By BETTY ROSBOTTOM and BETTY ROSBOTTOM,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | February 18, 2006
"When in doubt, serve meat and potatoes." That's a motto I embrace often when entertaining, if my guest list does not include vegetarians. My spouse, like countless others, swoons when he hears this combination mentioned. He likes almost any variation on the theme. Last month, he was delighted by a creamy potato gratin that I served with a leg of lamb on one occasion and with beef tenderloin on another. He even went off his diet and indulged in seconds. The rich gratin is a remake of a scalloped potato dish I created several years ago. In the original version, I topped layers of sliced potatoes with creme fraiche (a thick French cream that is a cross between heavy and sour cream)
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | January 5, 2003
Whenever I plan the menu for a winter dinner party, I always feel challenged to find interesting vegetables to serve with the main course. In the cold-weather months, side-dish possibilities are limited. Choices include root vegetables, fennel, Brussels sprouts and potatoes, which I typically roast or saute and sprinkle with herbs. However, a good friend recently mentioned that she had created a delicious carrot and leek gratin which, when served, had received rave reviews from guests. This baked vegetable dish has several unusual features.
NEWS
By Betty Rosbottom and By Betty Rosbottom,Special to the Sun | December 22, 2002
For more than a decade I invited friends to our house for New Year's Eve dinner. But last year, feeling burnt out, I suggested to my husband that we forgo entertaining on Dec. 31 and eat out instead. We did, and I confess that I was disappointed. Although we had a lovely meal, I missed creating the menu, setting a festive table and inviting others to our home to enjoy this special night. This year I've decided to reinstate my annual celebration and plan to share the cooking with another couple.
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