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Gratification

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By ELLEN GOODMAN | October 8, 1991
It is 75 degrees and the leaves on the maple tree in my yard are barely tinged with red. An entire division of bees, flying in a tight-winged formation that would put the Blue Angels to shame, is competing for a landing spot on the snapdragons.The raspberries we planted last year are offering their second, shabbier growth. The tomato plants, in a fit of undue optimism, have put out another set of flowers.We are talking apples today. We are talking foliage. We are talking Indian summer. We are most definitely not talking reindeer and large, cheery men in red outfits.
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NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,john-john.williams@baltsun.com | February 1, 2009
Few students would complain about a snow day. But it might be a good idea to check back in with them June 18. That's the new last day of the school year in Howard County public schools as dictated by last week's winter storm, which scuttled two days of classes. The originally scheduled last day was Tuesday, June 16. The weather created an extended, unexpected break for county students, who had a half-day for testing Friday, Jan. 23, and last Monday for a scheduled professional work day. Tuesday and Wednesday's snow days, plus a two-hour delay Thursday, amounted to a gift from the gods of winter.
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FEATURES
By Jean Marbella | October 26, 1990
You've heard what his answering machine says. (He's not in because he's out with your wife.) You've heard his advice on what to say to a milkmaid. (It involves, suffice it to say, udders, jugs and whipped cream.) You've heard what he says to salesmen named Dick. (Is your last name . . .)And now, Mr. Manly has agreed to his first-ever interview in print. We got him before Playboy, before Esquire, before all those other manly publications -- mainly because we asked and they didn't.Mr. Manly, as morning listeners to 98 Rock (WIYY-FM)
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,dan.thanh.dang@baltsun.com | November 1, 2008
In the old days, when you saw something you really liked but couldn't afford, you didn't just charge it and take that sucker home. You put it on layaway. Over a period of some weeks or months, you could make payments in installments - which was a little easier than forking out all the dough all at once. This meant you couldn't take home what you wanted right away, but it was yours once you paid in full. It was a great concept that went the way of the dinosaur once credit started getting handed out like so much candy corn on Halloween.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tribune Media Services | May 6, 2007
The outpouring of reader mail over the hassles of mail-in rebates had barely subsided when a new flood gushed forth on why it takes middle-class America two incomes "just to get by." To clarify, I don't believe it does. That claim belongs to CNN commentator Lou Dobbs, who regularly lashes out at U.S. immigration policy, corporate downsizing, job outsourcing and skyrocketing health-care costs. While acknowledging these are legitimate issues, I dared to suggest that many Americans struggling on two incomes should blame their own profligate and careless ways.
BUSINESS
By DAN THANH DANG and DAN THANH DANG,dan.thanh.dang@baltsun.com | November 1, 2008
In the old days, when you saw something you really liked but couldn't afford, you didn't just charge it and take that sucker home. You put it on layaway. Over a period of some weeks or months, you could make payments in installments - which was a little easier than forking out all the dough all at once. This meant you couldn't take home what you wanted right away, but it was yours once you paid in full. It was a great concept that went the way of the dinosaur once credit started getting handed out like so much candy corn on Halloween.
BUSINESS
By ELLEN JAMES MARTIN | January 31, 1993
It was 1988 when the Columbia couple bought the 5-acre parcel in a distant corner of Carroll County. Their dream? To pack up the two kids and cocker spaniel and move to a realm so quiet they could hear the wind sway the giant evergreens at night.But five years later, the couple's plans to build a new house in the country have been postponed for another 10 years, at least. Meanwhile, the design of the large white-pillared house has been scaled way back. Not only did they lop off a fourth bedroom and third bath, they also eliminated a living room -- figuring most of their time will be spent in the den, anyway.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | March 22, 1993
Washington. -- Liberals and conservatives currently have retrospective mentalities, liberals reacting to the 1980s, conservatives to the 1960s. The difference demonstrates a double paradox of today's politics: Conservatism is the more radical, meaning thorough, critique of contemporary America. And one kind of conservatism -- call it cultural conservatism -- is almost as critical of another variant of conservatism as it is of liberalism.The liberal complaint about the 1980s concerns economics -- income disparities, ''unfair'' top tax rates and other matters more easily altered than the cultural tendencies that are the subject of the conservative critique of the lingering legacy of the 1960s.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | November 18, 1993
Washington. -- President Clinton's passionate philippic in a black church in Memphis last Saturday demonstrated that, regarding inner-city violence, the range of the discussable is expanding, but we still are a far cry from candor.Mr. Clinton, a government man, instinctively believes that the underclass, which he says might better be called the outer class, principally lacks what governments can provide -- services, work. His instinct is reinforced by reading sociologist William Julius Wilson's analysis of how, in Mr. Clinton's words, the inner cities ''have crumbled as work has disappeared.
NEWS
By Michel T. Halbouty | July 13, 1995
THE DEMORALIZATION of America has become unrelenting, and the passiveness of the people toward this cancer eating away at our culture is beyond comprehension.Demoralization is a decisive step toward decadence and we are fast approaching a point of no return. In a recent newspaper article, culture critic William J. Bennett and C. Delores Tucker, president of the National Political Congress of Black Women, stressed the diabolic effect of lewd music on our society. But music is not our only problem.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz and Humberto Cruz,Tribune Media Services | May 6, 2007
The outpouring of reader mail over the hassles of mail-in rebates had barely subsided when a new flood gushed forth on why it takes middle-class America two incomes "just to get by." To clarify, I don't believe it does. That claim belongs to CNN commentator Lou Dobbs, who regularly lashes out at U.S. immigration policy, corporate downsizing, job outsourcing and skyrocketing health-care costs. While acknowledging these are legitimate issues, I dared to suggest that many Americans struggling on two incomes should blame their own profligate and careless ways.
BUSINESS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 18, 2005
Save your money. Your parents and grandparents taught you the concept when you were a child. Remember the Christmas club savings accounts? "Save Your Money" also is the slogan that anchors the marketing campaign of ING DIRECT, an Internet bank that promotes no-hassle savings accounts and aims to bring consumers back to the old-fashioned concept of saving. It's not a hard thing to understand. So why aren't more consumers doing it? No doubt, some consumers live hand to mouth financially.
BUSINESS
By Humberto Cruz | May 22, 2005
These questions are unrelated ... or are they? Q. What are some cost-effective strategies for exiting B shares of actively managed mutual funds? I have come to loathe the back-end loads and annual fees. How can I efficiently switch to no-load, low-cost index funds? Q. I recently retired and bought a fixed annuity. I am guaranteed 7.5 percent interest the first year and no less than 2 percent after that. Is this a good investment? I heard if I need to take the money out, I may have to pay a big penalty.
NEWS
By Valerie Finholm and Valerie Finholm,THE HARTFORD COURANT | March 20, 2005
Do you look like a mutton dressed like a lamb? Or have you given in to frumpiness? Do you look like a mutton dressed like a lamb? Or have you given in to frumpiness? Whether you're a mother with a toddler or teenager, a woman going through a midlife crisis, newly single or moving into menopause, your clothes can make a difference in your life, according to British fashion journalists Trinny Woodall and Susannah Constantine's new book, What You Wear Can Change Your Life (Riverhead, $22)
NEWS
By Elaine Markoutsas and Elaine Markoutsas,Universal Press Syndicate | July 25, 2004
From simple sheers to lavish silk-embroidered panels, draperies are so much more than window dressing. They can shape a room's personality and ground its design style. Fashion colors, patterns and a range of styles to blend with interiors once were available only as custom options. Ready-to-hang curtains had a bland, generic look, usually off-white and pinch-pleated. In recent years, retailers and catalogs made shopping easier -- if you had standard-sized windows. But now, even if a 10-foot-tall window needs to be dressed, the search for appropriate attire is not impossible.
NEWS
November 30, 2001
The state needed some fiscal leadership before budget crunch In a recent editorial on the budget crisis, The Sun stated that now is the time for "responsible leadership and deferred political gratification" ("Severe financial test seems certain for state," Nov. 16). While the sentiment is correct, the timing is late. Fiscal leadership should have begun a year ago. During the 2001 legislative session, Republican lawmakers warned our Democrat colleagues of the consequences of spending more than a half a billion dollars in rainy-day funds when indicators forecast a weakening economy.
NEWS
By Lyle Denniston and Lyle Denniston,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | December 10, 1995
"The Final Judgment," by Richard North Patterson. Knopf. 437 pages. $25 If Richard North Patterson can get his mind off of sex (now and then he does), he can be a superb chronicler of crime, human frailty and the curious intimacy that joins law to life. Skip over most of the sex scenes, and this San Francisco trial lawyer's remaining fiction literally surrounds the reader, making escape difficult.Mr. Patterson seems to operate on the lamentable presumption that bonding - and alienation, too - happens to individuals primarily during or about sex. So the reader is forever being pulled back into the bedroom of the author's mind.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff Writer | March 5, 1993
In a one-day blitz of reroofing, floor-laying, painting and renovating, a volunteer organization will spruce up five homes owned by people who are poor, elderly or disabled.The newly formed Carroll County chapter of "Christmas in April" is looking for volunteers and donors to participate in the daylong fixing blitz April 24, said chapter president Sam Maccherola of Eldersburg.The national group grew out of a grass-roots effort 20 years ago in Midland, Texas. It brings together volunteers "in the American barn-raising tradition," according to the group's literature.
SPORTS
By Milton Kent and Milton Kent,SUN SPORTS MEDIA CRITIC | September 1, 1999
The bad news, for local sports viewers, is that because Friday afternoon's Ravens-New York Giants exhibition game is not a sellout, it will not be seen live. But the good news, for local soap opera fans, is that "The Young and The Restless" won't be pre-empted after all.Team officials announced yesterday that 2,000 tickets remained unsold for Friday's game, which starts at noon. Under NFL rules, any game that fails to sell out at least 72 hours before kickoff cannot be shown live in that market.
BUSINESS
By Michael Himowitz | March 15, 1998
NOW AND THEN, when I'm working late at night, a little box pops up on my computer screen. The message varies, but it's usually something like this:"Greetings, Parental Unit!"If you remember the Coneheads (of "Saturday Night Live" and movie fame), you'll recognize this form of address. The message comes from my son (or Filial Unit), who's sitting in his college dorm room a couple of states away.Sometimes Parental and Filial Units just exchange a few words; other times we open a chat window for a real "conversation."
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