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By Kathy Hudsonhudmud@aol.com | January 13, 2012
When Baltimore City cut the grass on the Roland Avenue median for the last time this fall, an adjacent plot of grass was skipped. The point at the intersection of Roland Avenue, Ridgewood Road and Cold Spring Lane looked like a prairie for months.  With warmer temperatures into January, the grass continued to grow.   At the end of October, I called 311.  They said the city would take action in 14 business days. We watched. We waited. Nothing happened. During November and December, the point looked increasingly shabby.
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By Ellen Nibali and For The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2014
My pumpkins turned orange in August! How can I make sure they survive until Halloween? Pumpkins are coloring ahead of schedule by about three weeks this year because of the cool summer. When the rind is hard, cut them from the vine, leaving 3 to 4 inches of stem attached to the pumpkin. Avoid nicks or bruises. When they ripen early, it's helpful to wash them with a weak bleach solution (1 tablespoon bleach to 1 pint water) and rinse before storing them inside on a pallet or platform that allows air to circulate around the fruit.
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NEWS
March 18, 2011
There is at least one alternative available to reduce the use of harmful chemicals on lawns in Maryland ("Less-toxic lawns in Md.," March 16): Grow less grass. If you drive through Baltimore County in the winter you may have noticed that many lawns and highway medians are an ugly shade of brown. Instead of growing grass, better to use a variety of ground covering plants, native shrubs and trees and a variety of mulch that requires no mowing and very little water. For example, a butterfly garden can be beneficial to a variety of wildlife and be much more attractive than grass.
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By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2014
There weren't any keepers yet, but the fish were definitely biting for Willie Edwards one day last week as he trolled along the edge of the Susquehanna Flats. The 72-year-old fisherman from North East said he'd caught "a lot of little rock," or striped bass. The Flats - a vast, grass-covered shoal at the mouth of the Susquehanna River - are a magnet for fish and the anglers who pursue them. But they're also a symbol to scientists of the Chesapeake Bay's resilience, and of its ability to rebound, if given a chance, from decades of pollution and periodic battering by storms.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | November 13, 2013
Ravens kicker Justin Tucker doesn't miss very often, regardless of his surroundings. He has made 16 straight field goals, one of the longest active streaks in the NFL, and he has made 48 of his 53 career field-goal attempts in the regular season. His 46-yard field goal at M&T Bank Stadium last Sunday was the fifth game-winner of his career. He has missed just three kicks on his home turf in two seasons. But as good as he has been kicking on synthetic surfaces, he has been even better on grass.
NEWS
May 30, 2012
Since Baltimore is in tight financial straits, why build a grass median in the middle of any city street ("City erected six-foot fence to protect grass," May 27)? Grass requires maintenance - mowing, watering, clearing debris. Instead, use that $20,000 to plant vegetable gardens neighborhoods can use to provide food for the hungry or create grass playgrounds for children. Anne Hackney, Parkton
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By Kevin Cowherd | April 24, 1992
It is a fine spring day. The sun is shining and birds are chirping and I am sitting here wracked with lawn anxiety.I can see the lawn through my window now. It squats out there like some kind of horrible giant toad, brown and pitted and ugly beyond all conventional description.All the other lawns in the neighborhood are green and lush. I hate the people who tend those lawns. They think they're so cool with their rotary tillers and their exotic fertilizers and their seeders and spreaders.Did it ever occur to them that some people might like a lawn with lots of bare spots and crab grass infestation?
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 29, 2012
The style of fence is called "Barcelona," but some residents of Tuscany-Canterbury say it reminds them more of Berlin. It's the "Gorbachev fence" to the mother of neighbor Fred Chalfant, who often walks his dog past the barrier, which is six-feet tall, topped with spikes and divides West 39th Street down the middle. Last week, Baltimore City Councilwoman Mary Pat Clarke called it “a Berlin Wall of a fence,” as she demanded justification for the fence's appearance, in a letter to the city's Department of Transportation, which erected the fence in mid-April.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2012
The Baltimore Department of Transportation has a message for the residents of Tuscany-Canterbury: Do not walk on our grass. But instead of little signs, the transportation department conveys that message with a six-foot, spike-topped fence. The barrier runs down the middle of the newly seeded median it is protecting. "They say it's to protect the grass, but a light layer of hay would have remedied that," said Sandra Snow, who lives and works in the neighborhood. "A nice path, a walkway, a low hedge - there are so many things that could have been done.
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By Fred Rasmussen | July 31, 1994
Within the next week, please send old photos of children doing homework to Way Back When, Sun Magazine, 501 N. Calvert St., Baltimore, Md. 21278. You must include caption information and your daytime phone number. Also, enclose a stamped, self-addressed envelope if you'd like your photo returned. If your photo is your only copy, please send a good-quality duplicate, not the original. No faxes or newspaper clippings, please.
NEWS
July 17, 2014
As someone who runs along the Inner Harbor frequently, it's easy to recall the many times walkers would stop to see the trapeze school participants and teachers performing there a decade ago. It was a natural draw, especially in the evening with lights beaming on the net-surrounded spot. The high cost of the attraction probably did it in. But it is with some dismay that I read about plans regarding Rash Field that would take away the constant attraction that is the beach volleyball courts ( "City looks at another go-round at Rash Field," July 11)
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
Sixth in a series of profiles of candidates for governor. Not long into her campaign for governor, Democrat Heather R. Mizeur coined a response to the question still dogging her today: Can she win? To the pundits and the radio hosts, to donors and supporters across the state, to everyone who says she's an intriguing choice but seems a long shot, Mizeur gives the same optimistic answer: "This campaign is about breaking the illusion of impossibility. " The improbable, if not impossible, would be an astronomical ascent in Maryland politics from the House of Delegates to the governor's mansion as the state's first female governor and the first openly gay person to be elected governor in the country.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | June 7, 2014
Kurt Bluemel, a nursery owner and plants man who was called the "Johnny Appleseed of ornamental grasses," died of cancer Wednesday at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The Baldwin resident was 81. Mr. Bluemel, who propagated and popularized willowy, straight and flowing grasses, was also known as the Grass King. His grasses filled Oprah Winfrey's garden and he created gardens for industrialist Howard Head and other Maryland figures. He was a wholesale grower with nurseries in Baldwin, another on the Eastern Shore near Crisfield and a third in Florida near Orlando.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 21, 2014
Underwater grasses rebounded last year in the Chesapeake Bay and its rivers, partially reversing a three-year decline in a key indicator of the bay's health, scientists said Monday. Aerial surveys detected a 24 percent increase in aquatic vegetation baywide, from 48,195 acres in 2012 to 59,927 acres last year. That's only about third of the goal federal and state officials have set for restoring grasses to levels approaching what they were 50 or 60 years ago. Robert J. Orth, a biologist with the Virginia Institute of Marine Science who coordinates the two-state survey, called last year's growth "a good recovery from what we've been seeing in the previous three years, but it still is far off from our high point" of nearly 90,000 acres in 2002.
SPORTS
By Childs Walker and The Baltimore Sun | April 2, 2014
Thoroughbred racing will resume at Pimlico Race Course on Thursday afternoon with a nine-race card to kick off the track's 35-day spring meeting. The schedule will be highlighted by the 139 t h Preakness Stakes, with a richer purse of $1.5 million, up from $1 million in 2013. Pimlico will host racing Thursday through Sunday until the May 17 Preakness and Friday through Sunday between the Preakness and the June 7 Belmont Stakes in New York. The Pimlico schedule will include 25 stakes races with purses totaling about $4.7 million.
NEWS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Wintry weather dragged on Tuesday, with light snow falling by midday expected to bring a slushy couple of inches of snow. The National Weather Service predicts 1-3 inches across the region, with a winter weather advisory in effect until midnight. But accumulating snow likely will stick to grassy surfaces for the most part, as the springtime sun makes accumulation difficult on pavement. Snow was expected to continue into mid-afternoon. State Highway Administration crews treated roadways ahead of the storm, expecting slick spots once snow starts falling by midmorning Tuesday and possibly lasting into the evening.
NEWS
March 20, 2014
Maryland gubernatorial candidate Del. Heather Mizeur has decided to run a campaign based upon returning power to the people rather than caving in to the big money that dominates most elections. Ms. Mizeur became the first candidate for the office since 1994 to accept public financing for her campaign - rejecting the notion that elections must be rigged and bought by the biggest spender. Her opponents in the Democratic primary, state Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler and Lt. Gov. Anthony G. Brown, have all gone the other direction, wooing lobbyists and corporate executives for cash and more ad time.
NEWS
Susan Reimer | February 19, 2014
If a husband takes on more chores, does a grateful wife repay his efforts with more sex? It might depend on which chores. Lori Gottlieb, a psychologist and author of "Marry Him: The Case for Settling for Mr. Good Enough," suggested in a New York Times Magazine article that partners in so-called peer marriages, or more equal marriages, report having less sex than partners in marriages where the husband and the wife perform more traditional duties....
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