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BUSINESS
By Harold Glicken and Harold Glicken,Knight-Ridder News Service | June 28, 1993
In freshman economics they taught us that there is no such thing as a free lunch. It was a lesson we have taken to heart and to the bank on many occasions.The folks at Computer Associates have come up with a variation on the free lunch axiom: Free software.Kiplinger's CA-Simply Money is simply free (except for a $6.95 mailing charge) to the first million callers.So what do you get for nothing?What you get is a very powerful personal financial program that makes good use of Windows 3.1. In this program icons are easily identifiable.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2011
Viewers see first the beast's ravenous mouth, with six fangs increasing in size and as pointed as daggers. The fiend is wearing a "Vote" button with an image of the American flag, and its tail snakes into a dollar sign. Even before gallery-goers scan the caption — "Monstrous costs: Total House and Senate campaign expenditures" — they have a good idea which dismal fact of modern life is being illustrated. Moreover, they know exactly how artist Nigel Holmes feels about the increase.
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NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | January 25, 2008
Richard Schad has been keeping weather records in Ellicott City since 2004. "I see day after day of mild-to-warm temperatures for nearly every year for December and January. How has the daily average temperature changed over the last 5 to 10 years ... at BWI?" Ditch the fur hat. It has trended generally milder. Six of the past 10 Decembers and eight of the past 10 Januaries, have surpassed the 30-year averages. You can graph the long-term change and see for yourself at baltimoresun.com/climate
NEWS
By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,Sun Reporter -- Weather Blogger | January 25, 2008
Richard Schad has been keeping weather records in Ellicott City since 2004. "I see day after day of mild-to-warm temperatures for nearly every year for December and January. How has the daily average temperature changed over the last 5 to 10 years ... at BWI?" Ditch the fur hat. It has trended generally milder. Six of the past 10 Decembers and eight of the past 10 Januaries, have surpassed the 30-year averages. You can graph the long-term change and see for yourself at baltimoresun.com/climate
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | February 24, 2005
Address: babynamewizard.com / namevoyager / What's the point?: If your elementary-school memories include being called on by your first name and last initial, you've surely given thought to name popularity. The NameVoyager program at "The Baby Name Wizard" site tracks not the popularity of names, but rather their frequency across the decades according to Social Security data in the United States. Click on "Launch NameVoyager," type in any name -- or partial name -- and see the graph change.
NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Staff Writer | June 2, 1993
A leading scientist in the study of chemical compounds called "free radicals" testified yesterday that after failing to replicate experiments based on published research by Dr. Gerald E. Rosen, he suspected scientific fraud.Dr. Ronald J. Mason, a research chemist at the National Institute of Environmental Science in North Carolina, said in Baltimore County Circuit Court that he discovered in 1984 that Dr. Rosen had duplicated a graph from an earlier article while reporting a later experiment.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun Staff Writer | February 21, 1994
As Amber Freeman bit the head off a gummy troll, she explained that what looked like a candy festival at her table was really math.The youngsters were graphing the color distribution of the candies before devouring them. Each child was coloring his or her own graph, which in turn would feed into a larger graph for everyone at the table and eventually a wall-mounted graph for the third grade.Nearby, other groups of third graders were rounding the bases on a baseball diamond or planning a tailgate party.
NEWS
By Capt. Bob Spore | September 15, 1991
There is nothing magical about a young-of-year (YOY) survey, nor theresults of one.The survey is just one tool biologists use to determine the "relative abundance" of a given species. The striped bass YOY survey and index do, however, receive a great deal of press coverage.Biologists gather lots of data, and they love to make graphs. Somewhere along the line someone noticed that the graph for the YOY striped bass survey was very similar to the graph of the annual commercial striped bass harvest.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | May 13, 1996
IF I'M LATE WEIGHING in here, blame it on naivete.As a hard-bitten, cynical, newspaper type, I'm supposed to expect the worst from our public officials. And yet, somehow, I still expect, if not the best, at least something approaching adequate.Is that naive or just plain stupid?Whatever, I was certain that Jodie Ulrich, the pepper-spray poster girl, would be back in Chesapeake High long ago, doing whatever it is that happy teen-agers do (don't ask).So, I held back, confident that the right thing would be done, while I looked into more pressing issues, like McDonald's dangerous experiments with Dijon.
SPORTS
By THE HACKENSACK RECORD | November 14, 2000
HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. -- The subject was quarterbacks, and it's important for Jets fans to know what coach Al Groh and quarterback Vinny Testaverde were saying and what they were not saying about the position. For instance, Groh did not say he was thinking about sitting Testaverde in favor of Ray Lucas, for a series, a half or a game in the Jets' next attempt to mend their split offensive personality Sunday in Miami. And Testaverde was not volunteering to hold any clipboards. Yet both acknowledged yesterday the possibility of such a development if Testaverde continues to battle himself, the Jets' system and personnel, and opponents in a familiar three-quarters-one-quarter syndrome that he experienced again in the 23-15 loss the night before in Indianapolis.
BUSINESS
By DAVID ZEILER | August 30, 2007
Here's a question for those of you who went back to school this week, particularly those focused on mathematics: Where do you get custom-made graph paper? Thanks to a Westminster company called Black Cat Software, you can use your Mac to do it with Graph Paper Maker (shareware, $19.99). Black Cat has produced quite a few shareware products for the Mac since its founding in 1991, such as Audiocorder, a nicely executed sound recording program. I can barely remember using graph paper when I was in school, but as an English major I treated math the way Mac aficionados treat Windows -- I dealt with it only if necessary.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sarah Kickler Kelber | February 24, 2005
Address: babynamewizard.com / namevoyager / What's the point?: If your elementary-school memories include being called on by your first name and last initial, you've surely given thought to name popularity. The NameVoyager program at "The Baby Name Wizard" site tracks not the popularity of names, but rather their frequency across the decades according to Social Security data in the United States. Click on "Launch NameVoyager," type in any name -- or partial name -- and see the graph change.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Diaz and Sam Diaz,KNIGHT-RIDDER/TRIBUNE | May 13, 2004
The MP3 changed everything. When digital music hit the mainstream during the Napster craze, the world of music changed profoundly - for artists, record labels, retailers and especially for consumers. Suddenly, regular people had the ability to manage songs as computer audio files and record them to a CD that would play in the car or on a boombox. But that wasn't enough. Today's sophisticated users are kicking the digital music experience up a notch or two. They're downloading tracks off the Internet and converting them to formats that will record to a CD or will be recognized by their MP3 players.
NEWS
By Stephanie Desmon and Stephanie Desmon,SUN STAFF | November 7, 2001
At the front of the room is one of math teacher Katrina Comp's baggy pants-wearing, sneaker-shuffling students. Following the shouted instructions of his classmates, he walks forward, then backward, then faster, then slower -- his every movement graphed electronically on the overhead projector screen behind him. He is a living, breathing human graph -- and suddenly the three days of lessons about algebraic functions and slopes click, and these Eastern Technical...
SPORTS
By THE HACKENSACK RECORD | November 14, 2000
HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. -- The subject was quarterbacks, and it's important for Jets fans to know what coach Al Groh and quarterback Vinny Testaverde were saying and what they were not saying about the position. For instance, Groh did not say he was thinking about sitting Testaverde in favor of Ray Lucas, for a series, a half or a game in the Jets' next attempt to mend their split offensive personality Sunday in Miami. And Testaverde was not volunteering to hold any clipboards. Yet both acknowledged yesterday the possibility of such a development if Testaverde continues to battle himself, the Jets' system and personnel, and opponents in a familiar three-quarters-one-quarter syndrome that he experienced again in the 23-15 loss the night before in Indianapolis.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
SCHOOL TESTING officials don't talk like the rest of us. They speak not of roses, crabs and beer, but of norms, cluster equating, rubrics and coefficient alphas.So when I set out last month to watch the scoring of the 1999 Maryland School Performance Assessment Program reading tests, I expected incoherence.It wasn't that bad. The MSPAP scorers are Maryland teachers who speak plain English, and several of them spoke of their joy -- even after years of scoring -- when they come across a creative response from a totally anonymous Maryland third-grader.
NEWS
By Mike Bowler and Mike Bowler,SUN STAFF | August 1, 1999
SCHOOL TESTING officials don't talk like the rest of us. They speak not of roses, crabs and beer, but of norms, cluster equating, rubrics and coefficient alphas.So when I set out last month to watch the scoring of the 1999 Maryland School Performance Assessment Program reading tests, I expected incoherence.It wasn't that bad. The MSPAP scorers are Maryland teachers who speak plain English, and several of them spoke of their joy -- even after years of scoring -- when they come across a creative response from a totally anonymous Maryland third-grader.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | July 6, 1995
Houston. -- The mayor of the nation's fourth-largest city leans far back in his swivel chair, plants two cowboy-booted feet on his desk next to his well-worked computer and undertakes to explain his preternatural popularity.His constituents, who re-elected him to a second two-year term in 1993 with 91 percent of their votes, still feel more fondly toward him than is normal at this moment when the public's mood regarding politicians is to tar and feather them because that is quicker than impeachment.
NEWS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Staff | March 18, 1998
Prosectors began chipping away yesterday at the defense team's portrait of a fragile Ruthann Aron, saying she faked her answers on psychological tests to appear mentally unbalanced.A psychologist from Clifton T. Perkins Hospital center told a Rockville jury that Aron was a textbook example of someone "faking bad." That phrase is used by mental health professionals to describe someone who is malingering, or trying to do poorly on tests.Dr. Kevin Richards said Aron exaggerated her symptoms and showed an unlikely combination of symptoms on a 567-question, true-false test he gave her in October.
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | May 13, 1996
IF I'M LATE WEIGHING in here, blame it on naivete.As a hard-bitten, cynical, newspaper type, I'm supposed to expect the worst from our public officials. And yet, somehow, I still expect, if not the best, at least something approaching adequate.Is that naive or just plain stupid?Whatever, I was certain that Jodie Ulrich, the pepper-spray poster girl, would be back in Chesapeake High long ago, doing whatever it is that happy teen-agers do (don't ask).So, I held back, confident that the right thing would be done, while I looked into more pressing issues, like McDonald's dangerous experiments with Dijon.
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