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NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | May 5, 2014
Some future city workers will receive a 401(k)-style retirement plan rather than traditional pensions under a sweeping plan approved Monday by the City Council. The legislation - the result of a deal struck by Baltimore unions and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake - was stalled in a council committee for nearly a year until the mayor and union leader Glenard S. Middleton reached what both sides called a compromise. Rawlings-Blake initially called for all new municipal workers to be placed in a 401(k)
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 30, 2014
The campus at Kennedy Krieger Institute in East Baltimore is about to get a little bigger with plans for a new outpatient building to be built in part with an $8 million gift from the Harry and Jeanette Weinberg Foundation. Demand for outpatient treatment is growing 20 percent a year, contributing to the need for more space to expand services, Kennedy Krieger CEO Dr. Gary Goldstein said in announcing the plans Wednesday. "The building is full," Goldstein said. "This program has grown enormously because of the need," he added.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | April 29, 2014
CareFirst BlueCross BlueShield is giving Planned Parenthood of Maryland a $200,000 grant to invest in technology at its eight clinics. Planned Parenthood will use the money to invest in a two-year project to build a new electronic management system. The money will be awarded Wednesday at the group's 9th Annual Spring Gala at the Four Seasons Hotel in Baltimore. andrea.walker@baltsun.com Twitter.com/ankwalker
BUSINESS
The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency awarded the Maryland Port Administration a $750,000 grant to extend the port of Baltimore's program to replace older, more polluting trucks with new ones, the port announced Monday. Through the Dray Truck Replacement Program, the owners and operators of the diesel trucks that haul cargo in and out of the port can purchase newer, cleaner trucks that meet or exceed EPA emission standards. Since the program began in 2012, 82 older trucks have been replaced with cleaner models.
BUSINESS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 28, 2014
Brian Street stepped outside the barber shop where he works Monday at the mostly abandoned Old Town Mall to see a crowd of people surveying the corridor and discussing plans to demolish some of the empty buildings. A group of officials, including Gov. Martin O'Malley and Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, came to the 16-acre outdoor mall to announce a $300,000 investment to prepare the site for re-development. In all, the state's Strategic Demolition and Smart Growth Impact Fund will provide $5 million for 13 revitalization projects across Maryland.
NEWS
By Patrick Brown and Mary Kate Healy | April 24, 2014
Since September, when Maryland's highest court declared poor people had a constitutional right to a lawyer when first appearing before a judicial officer, the state's pretrial release system has been the subject of scrutiny, with many attorneys, judges and lawmakers calling for significant reforms. And rightly so. The system has failed to protect the freedom rights of indigent defendants. But regardless of any future overhaul needed to implement the court ruling, the legal community must recognize one option available to judicial officers to improve pretrial justice immediately: the increased use of unsecured bond.
HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | April 21, 2014
A doctor with the The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins has received one of 14 grants totaling $5 million to support research of pancreatic cancer. The $1 million grant, awarded by The  Pancreatic Cancer Action Network  and the  American Association for Cancer Research ,  was given to Dr. Dung T. Le. The grants are aimed at research that could help improve pancreatic cancer survival rates. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network has a goal to double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Nine Baltimore arts groups, including the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Artscape, have received a total of nearly $2.53 million in grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. The grants, announced Wednesday, included $100,000 for the BSO, $80,000 for the BMA and $45,000 for Artscape, Baltimore's free annual arts festival, which is scheduled this year for July 18-20. "These NEA-supported projects will not only have a positive impact on local economies, but will also provide opportunities for people of all ages to participate in the arts, help our communities to become more vibrant, and support our nation's artists as they contribute to our cultural landscape," said NEA acting chairwoman Joan Shigekawa.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
The last time Grant Balfour was in Baltimore, he thought he had landed in the place where he'd spend the next two years of his career. In December, Balfour arrived at the Warehouse to take a club physical that he believed would be the last step in finalizing a two-year, $15 million deal to replace Jim Johnson as Orioles closer. But instead of being introduced as the Orioles' new closer as he had expected, Balfour left town frustrated after being told that team doctors found something in the physical that they did not like.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
To better account for hundreds of millions of grant dollars, Baltimore finance officials have a plan to overhaul city policies, train staff and keep records in a centralized database. Harry E. Black, the city's finance director, said the project should take about a year to complete and cost between $300,000 and $500,000. The city also has hired a grants coordinator to oversee the money, which accounted for about 13 percent of the budget last year, or $332 million. "Whatever we receive, we want to make certain it's aligned with the city's priorities and goals and that we are managing this process and the funds … in the most efficient and effective way," Black said.
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