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NEWS
By Patrick Brown and Mary Kate Healy | April 24, 2014
Since September, when Maryland's highest court declared poor people had a constitutional right to a lawyer when first appearing before a judicial officer, the state's pretrial release system has been the subject of scrutiny, with many attorneys, judges and lawmakers calling for significant reforms. And rightly so. The system has failed to protect the freedom rights of indigent defendants. But regardless of any future overhaul needed to implement the court ruling, the legal community must recognize one option available to judicial officers to improve pretrial justice immediately: the increased use of unsecured bond.
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HEALTH
By Andrea K. Walker and By Andrea K. Walker | April 21, 2014
A doctor with the The Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins has received one of 14 grants totaling $5 million to support research of pancreatic cancer. The $1 million grant, awarded by The  Pancreatic Cancer Action Network  and the  American Association for Cancer Research ,  was given to Dr. Dung T. Le. The grants are aimed at research that could help improve pancreatic cancer survival rates. The Pancreatic Cancer Action Network has a goal to double pancreatic cancer survival by 2020.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and The Baltimore Sun | April 17, 2014
Nine Baltimore arts groups, including the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra and Artscape, have received a total of nearly $2.53 million in grants from the National Endowment for the Arts. The grants, announced Wednesday, included $100,000 for the BSO, $80,000 for the BMA and $45,000 for Artscape, Baltimore's free annual arts festival, which is scheduled this year for July 18-20. "These NEA-supported projects will not only have a positive impact on local economies, but will also provide opportunities for people of all ages to participate in the arts, help our communities to become more vibrant, and support our nation's artists as they contribute to our cultural landscape," said NEA acting chairwoman Joan Shigekawa.
SPORTS
By Eduardo A. Encina and The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
The last time Grant Balfour was in Baltimore, he thought he had landed in the place where he'd spend the next two years of his career. In December, Balfour arrived at the Warehouse to take a club physical that he believed would be the last step in finalizing a two-year, $15 million deal to replace Jim Johnson as Orioles closer. But instead of being introduced as the Orioles' new closer as he had expected, Balfour left town frustrated after being told that team doctors found something in the physical that they did not like.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
To better account for hundreds of millions of grant dollars, Baltimore finance officials have a plan to overhaul city policies, train staff and keep records in a centralized database. Harry E. Black, the city's finance director, said the project should take about a year to complete and cost between $300,000 and $500,000. The city also has hired a grants coordinator to oversee the money, which accounted for about 13 percent of the budget last year, or $332 million. "Whatever we receive, we want to make certain it's aligned with the city's priorities and goals and that we are managing this process and the funds … in the most efficient and effective way," Black said.
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | April 8, 2014
Maryland basketball fans had been clamoring all throughout the team's disappointing 17-15 season for third-year coach Mark Turgeon to do a makeover of the roster before the program joined the Big Ten. On Tuesday, what seemed like pure mid-winter fantasy became reality when three players - junior guard Nick Faust (City), sophomore center Shaquille Cleare and freshman point guard Roddy Peters - were granted their release to transfer. The moves came as Turgeon also prepared for the departure of assistant coach Scott Spinelli, who is expected to be named to a similar position at Boston College later this week.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
President Barack Obama will announce today that Bladensburg High School and two other schools in Prince George's County have won a $7 million federal grant to expand a program that helps students prepare for jobs in the region. The schools are among 24 winners of a national competition to recognize programs that focus on work skills and connecting students with employers in the region. Obama -- who will announce the grants in Prince George's County today -- will set aside $107 million for the program in all. Bladensburg High School offers programs in health and bioscience, for instance.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
A Maryland school superintendent wouldn't ordinarily give local systems a pass on the requirement that public school students go to school for 180 days a year. But these have not been ordinary times. The seemingly endless winter, with its unusual number of snow days, has raised the specter of students going to school into the last week of June. On Tuesday, the State Board of Education offered a way out. As light snow fell outside their meeting room, board members voted to give Superintendent Lillian Lowery the authority to waive up to five days of school this year for public schools and two days for private schools.
NEWS
By Brandi Bottalico, The Baltimore Sun | March 24, 2014
The Pride of Baltimore II took its first sail of the season Monday, as it traveled to Annapolis carrying a replica of the flag that inspired the national anthem. The flag has been displayed publicly only once since it was created by Maryland Historical Society volunteers last summer to commemorate the bicentennial of the War of 1812. On Tuesday it will play an integral role in the state's observation of Maryland Day, which celebrates the arrival of European colonists in Maryland in 1634.
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